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Werre_Fsck
12-07-2006, 09:38 AM
Saw Flyboys today. I rank it almost as good as Dark Blue World. Tons of shoot-em-up-dogfighting action, ok actors and a total hottie as the obligatory french chick.

As always, the plot is simple and the romance part unnecessary. You won't learn any tactics from this one: in the beginning they teach how to fire "short bursts" and then mostly waste ammo for the remaining part of the movie.

Most irritating was the overdone tracer smoke. It looks as if railgun was the main weapon in WW1 era.

On 0-100 range I rank this one 85 (15 extra points for the babe).

knightflyte
12-07-2006, 11:04 AM
Yeah, I liked the babe too. She was a beauty without that obvious polished model attractiveness so common in movies today. I'd certainly hace gone back to the Eiffel Tower to find her.

I hope we can see her in more movies.

Flyboys was fun. I wasn't expecting anything terribly accurate, but as someone who enjoys flight I give it a good thumbs up. It'll be on my DVD purchase list.

I'd have rather the movie be about a fictitous Escadrille instead of the Lafayette Escadrille, though.

DuxCorvan
12-07-2006, 01:32 PM
In fact tracer ammo, though existant, was somewhat rare those days. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

WWSensei
12-07-2006, 01:36 PM
I forgave the overabundance of tracer ammo since they were trying to make it easier for the average movie viewer to get a sense of the action. Similar to the "every German flies a red triplane" gimmick. Fact is, at least in America, the Red Baron flying a red triplane is all they know about WWI aviation and mainly because he was Snoopy's constant foe. It was a "fun" movie rather than historical though I think they did a decent job on nailing the sense of impending doom a lot of the fliers felt.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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"A lady came up to me on the street, pointed to my leather flight jacket and said, "Don't you know a cow was murdered for that jacket?" I replied menacingly, "I didn't know I left witnesses. Now, I'll have to kill you too."

Billy_BigBoy
12-07-2006, 02:33 PM
Well, the movie wasn't as bad as I expected. In fact, I enjoyed the move (and the frensh lady http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif )
I also liked the "show down" at the end, nice twist http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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Dash_C.
12-07-2006, 02:52 PM
I really don't have any strong feelings about this movie. Nothing spectacular about the plot, and the characters seem pretty standard. Kinda like the remake of The Italian Job. The dogfight scenes looked a bit better than what I've come to expect from Hollywood.

Got to see the "Je Vois Touts" Spad recently at Kermit Week's place.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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p-11.cAce
12-07-2006, 03:03 PM
No modern movie can begin to touch the classics of the past in plot, writing, or acting skill - The Blue Max will always be my fav WWI pic and is a fine example of the moviemakers art. However in so far as modern movies go I thought Flyboys was great and will be buying a few copies of the DVD for me and my friends. Yeah the graphics (and acting)were sometimes bad, the flight dynamics sometimes more Pitts than Fokker, and the plot and characters were built from the lego school of movie construction - BUT SO WHAT! It was a fun afternoon ride with just enough leather and lead to balance out the fluff and a pretty girl to boot - not to mention actual REAL aircraft in (some) of the shots and even a few main actors with REAL pilots licenses and flight time - heck David Ellison is a freaking competition aerobatic pilot! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif Don't let the accuracy whiners get you on this one.

VF-17_BOOM
12-07-2006, 05:00 PM
I have'nt seen it as of yet,although I'm reading a book by the same name"FLYBOYS" about the naval fliers of WWII,and POWs on IWO JIMA,I just started reading it but so far it's very good!It was written by the same man who wrote "FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS" which I have'nt seen either http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gifman,I gotta get out more!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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Aimosika
01-13-2007, 11:08 AM
Just saw this Flyboys thingy, holy ****, one of the worst movies ever. Planes flyin like in Microsoft sims. Cast, well, Backstreet boys go flyin'. Plot, again well, EVIL Germans shooting helpless pilot on the ground. I belive Edward Mannock was the only pilot who was credited with that.
"Aces High" and "Blue Max" are quite from a different planet than this. Why amercans cannot make a good war movie? (Exept perhaps "Flags of our Fathers" not toomuch history biasing there.)

fordfan25
01-13-2007, 12:16 PM
Originally posted by Aimosika:
Just saw this Flyboys thingy, holy ****, one of the worst movies ever. Planes flyin like in Microsoft sims. Cast, well, Backstreet boys go flyin'. Plot, again well, EVIL Germans shooting helpless pilot on the ground. I belive Edward Mannock was the only pilot who was credited with that.
"Aces High" and "Blue Max" are quite from a different planet than this. Why amercans cannot make a good war movie? (Exept perhaps "Flags of our Fathers" not toomuch history biasing there.) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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Xiolablu3
01-13-2007, 01:20 PM
Saving Private Ryan was a great war movie, also 'The Thin Red Line' , so the Yanks can do it very well, I thought Flyboys was a real boring, badly written film http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

I had read the story lots of times over in 'Commando - War Stories in Pictures' as a Kid

New guys come to squadron, 'Bad German' kills friend, 'Good' guy falls in love, Big SHowdown where 'Good' guy kills bad German.

Really bad story.

Compare the story with something like 'The Blue Max' or 'Aces High' and it just falls apart.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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"I despise what you say; I will defend to the death your right to say it."
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Aimosika
01-13-2007, 02:06 PM
Well "Saving Private Ryan" is my top of worst and biased war movies ever. Second is this US sub movie about enigma, dont even remember its name..(There was also this EVIL german sub captain who ordered shootin of guys in lifeboats.. That was the time I closed video). Third is "Pearl Harbor".

DuxCorvan
01-13-2007, 02:16 PM
'The Thin Red Line' was booooooring. I think they'd never make a film completely in slow motion, but there it is. And all those silly 'echo thoughts' and daydreams with blurred takes of that chick, and of the natives... zzzzz. It was a relief when that depressing moron finally got himself dead. Man, all the cinema was cheering those Japanese soldiers who took the bloke out of his misery.

Most dopey film after 'The English Patient' (another sleepy evening).

GH_Klingstroem
01-13-2007, 03:35 PM
Im with Aimosika!
One of the worst movies about any war than has ever been made. Period!!

Klemm.co
01-13-2007, 04:04 PM
Originally posted by Aimosika:
Well "Saving Private Ryan" is my top of worst and biased war movies ever. Second is this US sub movie about enigma, dont even remember its name..(There was also this EVIL german sub captain who ordered shootin of guys in lifeboats.. That was the time I closed video). Third is "Pearl Harbor".
Agreed.
The name of the movie you mean is U-571, btw.
The first time i watched Saving Private Ryan it wasn't so bad. But recently i saw it again and tuned it off half way through cause i just couldn't stand that much propanganda.
I know much more now than i did back then and just asked myself why there is such a great need for making a totally one-sided film whenever the producer is american or the like and the film is about WW2 featuring teh Germans and Allies.

Bearcat99
01-13-2007, 06:06 PM
Flyboys is certainly no DBW. It was enjoyable to me though. As for SPR.... I thought it was a great movie. I thought that for the Omaha Beach scene alone it was a milestone in war movies.... and for better or worse it did rekindle intrest in WWII. (Not to mention the fact that the 60th anniversary of D-Day was afoot.) Flyboys had it's drawbacks.....but since I never look to Hollywood for a history lesson anyway.... I just allow myself to be entertained..... the flaws of the movie were not show stoppers to me.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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tagTaken2
01-13-2007, 07:33 PM
Thin Red Line was one of the best war films I've seen. SPR is great visually... cliched with the dialogue and music, but saved by an idea.

In Das Boot, the sub captain orders the killing of survivors. He wasn't evil, and it's based on a true story. To my mind the best war film I've seen.


For a different type of war film, try this:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095327/

Xiolablu3
01-13-2007, 07:41 PM
Yeah I really thought Thin Red Line was a classic, it actually had some depth and thought behind it rather than just mindless killing for entertainment...

The battle of wills between the Sergeant (Sean Penn) and the guy who had AWOLed (James Caviezel)
, but came back to experience real war, was amazing too.

The Sergeant (Penn) knew he would get himself killed for his principles - and he did. Great to see the Sergeant really respected him after all, too. He cried at his grave at the end.

Also the Battle between the guy who wanted to look after his men, and the ******* (Nick Nolte) who just wanted glory, stuff the deaths. In the end, the ******* was right (in war), and the caring bloke was wrong. Sad but
true.

'You're OK! You HAVE your war, but I'm 53 and this is my FIRST war!!' - Great quote (But sad at the same time)

It had some great messages. I guess you have to be able to see a little deeper to actually understand and enjoy it, eh? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif


I like a twisting turning storyline, with surprises and depth. Flyboys cannot compare with something like 'The Thin Red Line' for me.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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"I despise what you say; I will defend to the death your right to say it."
-Voltaire

BaronUnderpants
01-14-2007, 12:34 AM
Well, considering that i thought Flyboys would be another Pearl Harbour...a realy bad, bad movie, i was plesently suprised actually.

None of that Us bravehart **** where both the french and germans where depicted as stupid cowards.

It was intertaining, and thats good anough for me.

Deedsundone
01-14-2007, 01:14 AM
Bah! Gula Divisionen beats them all,mark my words! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c84/S-8/J22.jpg

WWSensei
01-14-2007, 04:40 AM
Sorry, I thought the Thin Red Line was one of the most pretenious, over-the-top, condescending pieces of pablum to ever reek across the silver screen. The self-indulgent, oh-woe-is-me and cliched characters (based mostly on anti-military Vietnam baby-boomer misconceptions of military veterans) was mind-numblingly boring. I often wondered how long it took the actors and director to recover from the spinal injuries incurred from the constant kissing of their own asses.

Das Boot -- if it ain't the best war movie ever made it's a close second.

U571 - 99.9% of it was pure garbage. However, you got to see Jon bon Jovi get decapitated. That ought to count for something.

SPR? - First 15 minutes are some of the best war movie footage ever. Then it decends into the typical Hollywood feel good ****.

Blue Max - good aircraft footage, story was OK, but also pretty cliche even in it's day. "Dawn Patrol" with Errol Flynn was a better story.

Flyboys - fun entertainment, little historical value. As I said, I think they did a good job of nailing the general attitudes expressed by WWI pilots, but they went a bit fantasy on the dogfighting in terms of the Red Triplanes and tracers. However, I understand why they did that. I see a lot of people complain the aircraft maneuvered too well--I'd say go and watch them fly these old birds out at Rheinbeck and you would be surprised at just how maneuverable they were.

Pearl Harbor - some good CGI scenes of aircraft bombing battleships. However, any movie that starts off casting Alec Baldwin as Doolittle and starring Affleck is so far down the suckage scale as to be irrecoverable. There was no plot to speak of. Perhaps the worst movie ever made about war or placed in the war genre.

The Enemy Below - The classic movie of a destroyer captain versus a submarine captain. This was the movie that started that cliche'd fight (even copied in Star Trek). One of the first movies that made you cheer for both sides at the same time and relatively unknown by most.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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"A lady came up to me on the street, pointed to my leather flight jacket and said, "Don't you know a cow was murdered for that jacket?" I replied menacingly, "I didn't know I left witnesses. Now, I'll have to kill you too."

DuxCorvan
01-14-2007, 05:22 AM
Originally posted by WWSensei:
Sorry, I thought the Thin Red Line was one of the most pretenious, over-the-top, condescending pieces of pablum to ever reek across the silver screen. The self-indulgent, oh-woe-is-me and cliched characters (based mostly on anti-military Vietnam baby-boomer misconceptions of military veterans) was mind-numblingly boring. I often wondered how long it took the actors and director to recover from the spinal injuries incurred from the constant kissing of their own asses.

Agreed. A pretentious boring piece of cr*p.


I see a lot of people complain the aircraft maneuvered too well--I'd say go and watch them fly these old birds out at Rheinbeck and you would be surprised at just how maneuverable they were.

And fragile! Cotrarily to common belief, to die due to enemy action was rare compared to the ridiculous huge chance of being killed in an accident, by far the most common cause of casualties. Not surprising, flying in weathered hand-made machines designed in a hurry, barely tested, structurally feeble, fitted with unreliable and vibrating engines, fix pitch blades, leaking tanks and covered with linen and flammable varnish.

Take on account that, when WW1 started, planes had been invented about ten years before, and were completely unpractical and experimental till barely five years earlier. Now imagine that man had not flown till 1996, and that you could hardly maintain a plane in the air till 2001, and you'll understand what I mean.

The casualty rates in the first air forces, mainly due to accidents, were dismal. There was almost not hope of survival for any man recruited or enlisted. It was suicidal.

Xiolablu3
01-14-2007, 05:22 AM
I guess they should all have been singing 'USA - F*ck yeah!' whilst waltzing into Japanese MG fire on The Thin Red Line? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

'Oh My God all my mates are dead - never mind, lets have a party - Isnt war great?!?'

There was one guy who was enjoying himself, if you remember? The one who wasnt getting shot at...


I really want an argument with you on this one WSensai, http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif EDIT: And Duxcorvan

Thin Red Line was a WICKED film! How is having a good storyline and deep characters a bad thing?It got the message across that 'War is Hell' very well (A saying repeated by many Vets). Do you really believe war is all 'John Wayne' type glory?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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-Voltaire

leitmotiv
01-14-2007, 05:34 AM
THIN RED LINE was an embarrassment---complete corruption of the brilliant James Jones novel into a New Age fantasy. Had one good, realistic scene, though. The assault on the hilltop bunkers---the GIs pinned down beneath the perfect, blue sky---death and beauty---military pastoral.

Sensei right about THE ENEMY BELOW.

Kubrick's FULL METAL JACKET did a good job with Vietnam---the final scene when the Marines walk back to their bivouac singing the Mickey Mouse Club Song summed up the whole screw up for my generation.

Xiolablu3
01-14-2007, 05:44 AM
I never read the Thin Red Line novel, so I couldnt see it 'corrupted'.

I cant believe some of you would put the childish Flyboys story over this unique film.

I think the fact that it actually makes you think may put a few people off...I cant be bothered to write an eassay, so I'll cut and paste from someone who has taken the time...


'The "Thin Red Line" is not an easy film to understand. It uses one of the most complex narrative structures yet produced by cinema to tell three stories (yes, it DOES have a plot): 1) the one the book wanted to tell (the book's title comes from a 19th century allusion to the British Empire's infantry [red uniforms] whose small numbers managed to ?protect' the British ["civilization" from their point of view] from the countless hordes of "savages" which the Empire ruled (this concept is regrettably racist). James Jones used this analogy to tell the story of how young American soldiers with no battlefield experience become bloodied veterans. 2) the fundamental paradox of war: to protect "civilization" (all that we hold dear) we are prepared to send young men to fight in wars. We know that in war they will see and do things that will turn them into the very "savages" that we are trying to prevent from destroying our civilization. If you believe that there are things even worse in the world than war (genocide, rule by the Axis powers) then war is not irrational, but the paradox mentioned above exists. 3) man is not distinct from nature but a part of it. Therefore, nature is both beautiful and cruel. (Like our civilization and war).'

I guess I like to be educated and shown something new when I go to see a film. I like to see an artistic piece of work. Others just want to be entertained.

Each to their own. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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-Voltaire

cawimmer430
01-14-2007, 06:22 AM
Originally posted by tagTaken2:
In Das Boot, the sub captain orders the killing of survivors. He wasn't evil, and it's based on a true story. To my mind the best war film I've seen.


I think you're confusing U-571 with Das Boot. In U-571, the German captain orders the killing of the survivors. In Das Boot, the captain orders the submarine to reverse and leave the scene leaving the survivors to fend for themselves. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

German submarines used to help their victims - until after the Laconia Incident.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

-Christian W.

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leitmotiv
01-14-2007, 06:26 AM
You argue your case well, Xiolablu3. Malick is not a bad director. His DAYS OF HEAVEN is a sublime, other-worldly reverie which is probably my favorite film. To my mind he indulged in an inordinate amount of wool gathering in THIN. The novel is a systematic study of what happens to a small infantry unit in battle. James Jones was not Edmund Spenser---he did not write an allegory about God and man. Jones was primarily concerned about the emotional dilemma of the company commander, a Jewish lawyer, who felt an overwhelming moral responsibility to protect his men from harm. Well, of course, in war this is impossible, and those who command have to be bloody-minded enough to live with death and injury to their fighting men. In sum, the novel deals with practical matters, not philosophy. Malick, in my opinion, lost the thread. "The thin red line" was the classic description of the British Army at Waterloo---the British troops in their attenuated lines standing against the French. In the novel, the line refers to the thin line of American soldiers standing against the Japanese in the South Pacific at Guadalcanal.

leitmotiv
01-14-2007, 06:33 AM
Yes, cawimmer430, in point of fact, the biggest massacre of survivors was done by an American submarine, the WAHOO, which systematically shot a great many Japanese in the water. My father was on the submarines BOARFISH and CHARR in WWII, and, after sinking a Japanese ship, the exec of the CHARR ordered the sailors to turn the automatic weapons on the survivors. The sailors were unhappy because, to them, there was nothing lower than blowing away fellow sailors in the water. The boat's captain appeared on deck, cancelled the order, and told the exec to go below. The exec protested that shooting survivors was standard procedure on his other boats. The captain told him it wasn't on his. My father and the other sailors were relieved.

WWSensei
01-14-2007, 06:51 AM
I guess they should all have been singing 'USA - F*ck yeah!' whilst waltzing into Japanese MG fire on The Thin Red Line?

No. No where did I say anything close to that. I clearly stated Das Boot was my favorite and it can't be accused of being overtly pro-American. Assuming I have to have a "Team America" mindset in to critique a movie is a bit over the top. I did, in fact, point out the the two worst movies were ones that did exactly that--U51 and PH, so your comment is simply wrong in trying to outline my statements.

Thin Red Line was just pretentious from a pseudo-intellectual point of view. It was filled with cliches about war expressed by people with little to no concept of the military, veterans or war for that matter. It was straight out of the 60s clcihe anti-Vietnam sterotyped character and extremly predictable. Throw in how he completely missed the entire point of the novel it was supposedly based on and it makes it even worse. The book had an even better story to tell and they blew it.

The whole "it's not an easy film to understand" is an emperor's clothes argument. It's extremly easy to understand because all three of it's themes have been done in pretty much every war movie out of Hollywood since 1965. It was formulaic to the nth degree--and done in a boring manner to boot. Many critics even call it "Platoon - 1942" because it followed the formula so closely.

Flyboys was formula too, but it never pretended to be anything else. It was **** from a historical perspective but it did entertain. TRL was **** from a historical perspective and from an entertainment aspect.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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"A lady came up to me on the street, pointed to my leather flight jacket and said, "Don't you know a cow was murdered for that jacket?" I replied menacingly, "I didn't know I left witnesses. Now, I'll have to kill you too."

Xiolablu3
01-14-2007, 07:03 AM
Thanks for your thoughts guys http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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"I despise what you say; I will defend to the death your right to say it."
-Voltaire

tagTaken2
01-14-2007, 08:58 AM
Originally posted by cawimmer430:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by tagTaken2:
In Das Boot, the sub captain orders the killing of survivors. He wasn't evil, and it's based on a true story. To my mind the best war film I've seen.


I think you're confusing U-571 with Das Boot. In U-571, the German captain orders the killing of the survivors. In Das Boot, the captain orders the submarine to reverse and leave the scene leaving the survivors to fend for themselves. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

German submarines used to help their victims - until after the Laconia Incident. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You're quite correct about Das Boot.

I didn't express that very well, was attempting to say that survivors were condemned to death... but a submarine is not especially practical as a prison.

Xiolablu3
01-14-2007, 10:30 AM
Originally posted by leitmotiv:
In the novel, the line refers to the thin line of American soldiers standing against the Japanese in the South Pacific at Guadalcanal.


I always thought 'The Thin Red Line' was a play on words with the 'The Thin Blue Line', ie the Police always trying to stay on the right side of the law.

Have I got it the wrong way around? Did 'The Thin Red Line' come first?

EDIT: Yes you are correct Leitmotiv, thanks for teaching me my daily fact today :-

'The Thin Blue Line is a colloquial term for police and police forces. The term derives from 'The Thin Red Line' and suggests that a thin line of police officers prevents civilized society from descending into anarchy'<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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-Voltaire

Aaron_GT
01-14-2007, 11:29 AM
Sorry, I thought the Thin Red Line was one of the most pretenious, over-the-top, condescending pieces of pablum to ever reek across the silver screen.

Novels with a high level of reflection and pyschological content are notoriously difficult to film. That having been said there were military films with the 'echo thoughts' element all the way into WW2. I suspect that 'The Thin Red Line' is aiming to be something of a modern 'A Walk in the Sun' (1945). The latter was also based on a novel. I do wonder if Malick was harking back to this, which was quite a revolutionary film at the time, which isn't to say he actually achieved any advancement of the film making art.


Have I got it the wrong way around? Did 'The Thin Red Line' come first?

Refers to the 'Thin Red Line' of the British Army originally, AFAIK. They used to wear red uniforms.

leitmotiv
01-14-2007, 01:53 PM
Heh, heh, according to the always reliable, herf, herf, Wikipedia, "thin red line" referred to Balaclava 1854, not Waterloo, as was my understanding. I bring this up in case, for once, W is right.

I don't think it was the psychological content which made THIN so hard to film. Two excellent films were made out of ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT, for example. Each succeeded because they were faithful filmic treatments of a very good book. The psychological content of the book DAS BOOT was brilliantly handled in the film. Flawlessly. I think Sensei hit the nail on the head---Malick was scuppered by some pretty batty 1960's-era far Left ideas, and, on top of that, he forgot film is not ideas it is ideas conveyed through imagery and movement. Much of the film is so woolly and inane I can't take it seriously. I enjoy the crazed APOCALYPSE NOW because as bizarre as it gets with its imagery, it is grounded on a great deal of reality about how the managers buggered the hell out of that war. It is unique because it is a film on the war which doesn't seem to annoy either the Right or the Left. Terry Malick's film is like a '60's radical seminar. ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT is a devastating condemnation of war, but the book and the films never lose sight of building the case against war by depicting it in detail and with truth and honesty. Ditto with DAS BOOT. Malick lost the thread. I am curious as to why he was so fascinated by a detailed account of an infantry unit in war. DAYS OF HEAVEN was a dreamscape. Malick should have done PARADISE LOST, not Jones' novel.

Aaron_GT
01-15-2007, 04:41 AM
I don't think it was the psychological content which made THIN so hard to film. Two excellent films were made out of ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT, for example. Each succeeded because they were faithful filmic treatments of a very good book. The psychological content of the book DAS BOOT was brilliantly handled in the film.

I think in a way that proves my point. It is very hard to get the psychological stuff right, and there are very, very few films that manage it. The two films you name check are half a century apart, which is a very low hit rate!


Flawlessly. I think Sensei hit the nail on the head---Malick was scuppered by some pretty batty 1960's-era far Left ideas, and, on top of that, he forgot film is not ideas it is ideas conveyed through imagery and movement.

I'm not convinced by the suggestion that it is 'far left'. It's an easy target, but I see lots of similarities between 'The Thin Red Line' and A Walk in the Sun (or 'A Talk in the Sun' as some call it). The way the reflectiveness is handled is very similar in both films and 'A Walk in the Sun' is from the WW2 period. Every film maker is going to be, to some degree, affected by their environment, but calling the film a 'far left seminar' seems overdoing it. I can't help but see 'The Thin Red Line' as very much related to 'A Walk in the Sun'. I am not sure he succeeded, but then 'A Walk in the Sun' in terms of the acting and staging is a product of his time. The acting was fantastically naturalistic of its time, but it still looks dated 60 years on, but I think that is partly due to the fact that the way shots are composed has changed a lot since then.