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Tallyho1961
05-11-2005, 11:15 AM
Heads up fellow Canadians and those who can receive our History Channel:

Starting May 19 a multi-part series called 'Spitfire Ace' starts running. The promo I saw looked excellent. For those interested, there's more info here (http://www.historytelevision.ca/search/searchresults.asp?target=spitfire+ace&Submit.x=23&Submit.y=3)

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2005, 11:26 AM
Wasn't there a Canadian who did quite well in a Spitfire? Billy Bishop, or something like that?

It's a shame, born and raised in Canada, first generation, and I know more about my family's background history. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Fritz Franzen

Bremspropeller
05-11-2005, 11:28 AM
Well, when I think of a canadian Ace, Mr. Beurling comes to my mind - the "Falcon of Malta". http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

Tallyho1961
05-11-2005, 11:38 AM
Hi Fritz,

Actually Bily Bishop was a Canadian ace in WWI. His son, Arthur, flew Spitfires but did not achieve the same notoriety as his father.

Quick story: In Billy Bishop's autobiography he mentions getting careless one day, being jumped from behind, and having an enemy bullet pierce his windscreen. He kept the windscreen on his aircraft to remind himself to be more careful in the future. His airplane (A Nieuport, I think), including perforated windscreen, used to be on display at the National War Museum in Ottawa. When I first saw it about 20 years ago and realized that I knew the story behind that bullet hole (it was not explained at the museum) I got a real chill.

Dave.

PS - I'm first generation too, my parents are English.

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2005, 11:43 AM
Thx Dave, I guess I did know who he was but forgot.

BTW, did we have any aces in WW2? It seems to me there were a few but once again, just out of reach of my memory.

Fritz Franzen

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2005, 11:48 AM
Actually, I vaguely remember a story about Rommel's car being attacked by an Allied fighter. There was an American that thought he was responsible so for years it was just accepted. Someone later did an investigation and it was proven the pilot had actually attacked a different car in a different area. It was figured out the only possible pilot to do so was a Canadian. When he was confronted on this he admitted he was the attacker. When they asked him why he didn't say anything he simply said he didn't think it was so important.

Did you hear this? Maybe my facts are wrong but he does sound like a typical Canadian. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz Franzen

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2005, 11:51 AM
Originally posted by Bremspropeller:
Well, when I think of a canadian Ace, Mr. Beurling comes to my mind - the "Falcon of Malta". http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

Who? (insert embarrased smiley here)

Fritz Franzen

altstiff
05-11-2005, 11:52 AM
Originally posted by Bremspropeller:
Well, when I think of a canadian Ace, Mr. Beurling comes to my mind - the "Falcon of Malta". http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

Yes "buzz" lived to fly planes. He died while flying a cargo plane.

He was Canada's top ace in WW2 and I bet 99% of Canadians don't even know who he is.

Tallyho1961
05-11-2005, 11:59 AM
He was Canada's top ace in WW2 and I bet 99% of Canadians don't even know who he is.

I'm sure you're right - another case of that legendary self-effacing Canadian spirit. Don Cherry excepted, of course. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

For those in the know, however, there is a Beurling Avenue in Montreal. I think of him whenever I'm there.

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2005, 01:14 PM
Originally posted by Tallyho1961:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">
He was Canada's top ace in WW2 and I bet 99% of Canadians don't even know who he is.

I'm sure you're right - another case of that legendary self-effacing Canadian spirit. Don Cherry excepted, of course. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

For those in the know, however, there is a Beurling Avenue in Montreal. I think of him whenever I'm there. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ha ha ha, I am part of that 99%. As for Don Cherry, he's a cherry alright. It's a shame that he is a representative of Canada. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

Anyways, I'm attempting to slightly hijack this thread to learn something about our history. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Hint, hint http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Fritz Franzen

gombal40
05-11-2005, 01:32 PM
Originally posted by altstiff:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Bremspropeller:
Well, when I think of a canadian Ace, Mr. Beurling comes to my mind - the "Falcon of Malta". http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

Yes "buzz" lived to fly planes. He died while flying a cargo plane.

He was Canada's top ace in WW2 and I bet 99% of Canadians don't even know who he is. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Beurling was a killer in a airplane, He liked killing up close and was good in it
(do the google thing)
Then again, he didnt start it did he?

To bad that heroes of that magnitude are all too soon forgotten by the ones,he was ,after all, fighting for.

I would like a sticky for just the names. No politics just names.

Crazy Ivan

could we just make a sticky thread with names? and one line with why??

like to start with a russian guy

Aleksandr Ivanovich Pokryshkin

qoute
Pokryshkin's first MiG-3 was shot down by AA fire on July 3, 1941 over the Prut river, beyond enemy lines. He managed to force land his plane in the forest. He returned to the regiment after 4 days of walking, during which time the regiment gave him up as killed; thus, his stuff was devided amongst his wingmen

end quote

Respect

VW-IceFire
05-11-2005, 02:19 PM
I'm sure we've got plenty of Aces and we've got at least one and probably more pilots who won the VC (like Lt. "Hammy" Gray who sank a Japanese destroyer all by himself with a single 500lb bomb but was killed in the process). But...being typical Canadians...its not really a big deal.

Thats the trouble...we sometimes lack a glorified history because we just sort of blend over the details.

I think its RCAF No.412 that is now credited with shooting up Rommels car.

Taylortony
05-11-2005, 02:58 PM
Originally posted by Tallyho1961:
Heads up fellow Canadians and those who can receive our History Channel:

Starting May 19 a multi-part series called 'Spitfire Ace' starts running. The promo I saw looked excellent. For those interested, there's more info here (http://www.historytelevision.ca/search/searchresults.asp?target=spitfire+ace&Submit.x=23&Submit.y=3)

Yes you finally have it, this is the uk show that was produced, the winner getting to fly the spit to the point they would be operational, it was enjoyable and went along the war time flying route............ you will btw probably get the follow up show, this one will cover bombers http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

altstiff
05-11-2005, 04:24 PM
For those that want to know more......

George "Buzz" Buerling was a native of Montreal Canada and even met the Prime Minister Mackenzie King in November 1942.

He was one of the top 10 allied pilots in WW2 with 31 kills. He died mysteriously while piloting a transport plane near Rome Italy in 1948. He was on route to Israel to fight for the fledgling state and it is suspected the plane he was in was sabotaged.

Info from "Canada at War"......

blakduk
05-11-2005, 08:11 PM
Tallyho1961- thanks for the 'heads-up' re this show. I'll keep an eye out for it down here in oz- we usually have to wait about 18mths for these documentaries to fall off the edge of the world and land on out antipodean shores.
I agree with your assessment of the typical Canadian character, if there were grand prizes for understatement and modesty (what an irony that would be) Canucks would get it for sure

jensenpark
05-11-2005, 08:22 PM
There were a great many Cdn aces from WW2.(Although not as prolific as WW1, when Cdn's made up a huge proportion of the top scoring allied aces)There was even a Gladiator ace - and there weren't many of those period.

Arthur Bishop, Billy's son, has written quite a few books on our fliers and soldiers from the wars. Find them on Indigo.ca
Mcknight, Mcleod are a couple that come to mind.
Johnny Johnson writes about our Canucks a fair bit in his book Wing Commander.

For us shy, unassuming Canadians there are lots of books out there...just have to look a bit.


And a big thanks for the heads up on the History Channel.

altstiff
05-11-2005, 10:12 PM
Also of note was the famous BOB Doug Bader lead 242 squad, it was made up mostly of Canadians flying in the RAF.

gkll
05-12-2005, 12:10 AM
Keith "Skeets" Ogilvie, Bob Morrow, Don Morrison, Buzz Beurling of course, Lloyd Chadburn, Bert Houle. Wing Commanders and aces... just a few. Our boys did pretty good in both wars.... Most of them were typical Canadians, polite and well-mannered on the ground and something rather different in the air...

Bert Houle deserves special mention. He is not known like Buzz B, but must have been one of the 'best'. Fought to serve extra tours, was obviously a phenomenal shot, and was a natural leader. Spent most of his time in the Med theatre in Spitfires.

If anyone has sources for Canadian aces and notables from WW2 please post. Most of my info comes from bits and pieces spread throughout my collection, nothing in one spot.

Waldo.Pepper
05-12-2005, 12:17 AM
You're goint to love this site.


http://www.csd.uwo.ca/~pettypi/elevon/aces.html

BTW Buerling was not the pilot of the plane he died in. It was transporting him from Italy to Israel/Palestine. He was a passenger.

Incedentally it was the tenth time he had made a crash landing (8 times during the war). He used all his nine lives.

WTE_Ibis
05-12-2005, 02:52 AM
r

posted Wed May 11 2005 10:48
Actually, I vaguely remember a story about Rommel's car being attacked by an Allied fighter. There was an American that thought he was responsible so for years it was just accepted. Someone later did an investigation and it was proven the pilot had actually attacked a different car in a different area. It was figured out the only possible pilot to do so was a Canadian. When he was confronted on this he admitted he was the attacker. When they asked him why he didn't say anything he simply said he didn't think it was so important.

Did you hear this? Maybe my facts are wrong but he does sound like a typical Canadian. Veryhappy

Fritz Franzen


"As my pitiful

----------------------------------------------------
Not according to Pierre Closterman,and I quote,
"Oliver,followed by Jacques did a 180 turn,heading straight for the target on the ground.Both of them opened fire on the car,which left the road and overturned.-------
----when the official archives were opened in 1975 it turned out it was 602 squadron.---------
Oliver opened fire with his two 20mm guns and his four 303 machine guns.The drivers' arm was torn off ---- and he collapsed over the steering wheel-------"

602 was a Scots squadron,Oliver was a
New Zealander and Jacques was French.

This is a fantastic read.The Big Show by Pierre Closterman.
Cheers, Ibis.

altstiff
05-12-2005, 06:38 AM
Originally posted by Waldo.Pepper:
You're goint to love this site.


http://www.csd.uwo.ca/~pettypi/elevon/aces.html

BTW Buerling was not the pilot of the plane he died in. It was transporting him from Italy to Israel/Palestine. He was a passenger.

Incedentally it was the tenth time he had made a crash landing (8 times during the war). He used all his nine lives.

According to my book here he was the pilot. It is called "Canada at war" story's by Mcleans magazine of Canadians at war.

horseback
05-12-2005, 11:33 AM
Originally posted by Tallyho1961:

I'm sure you're right - another case of that legendary self-effacing Canadian spirit. Don Cherry excepted, of course. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

For those in the know, however, there is a Beurling Avenue in Montreal. I think of him whenever I'm there.

Legendary self-effacing Canadian spirit? Do you mean that William Shatner was EXILED for lack of self-effacement? Man, I thought Canadian winters were harsh!

cheers

horseback

kameron1974
05-12-2005, 12:05 PM
I did a project on Beurling in grade 6. Apparently very good at deflection shooting. He was a very quiet man who did not socialise at all with his squad mates. Prefered to sit in his quarters and write to his mom. Good lookin guy too. I saw the ceremony on History TV(Can) where he meets the PM and they give him his DFC again. I think he says two words and melts away into the shadows leaving the cameras begging for more. They didn't get it.
Truely a unique individual among WW2 aces. Up there with Galland,Bader and Johnson I could go on and on. The variey of different personalities is amazing.
The pilot not thinking the shot up staff car was important is so typically Canadian I find it terribly amusing. What,lets us know when you sink a battleship.
Cameron-Toronto

Lunix
05-12-2005, 03:38 PM
"Screwball" (his real nick) Beurling wrote a novel of his experiences on Malta. This is educational, amusing and easy to read. Hes got that hat-at-a-jaunty-angle-devil-may-care prose down pat. Anyway I highly recommend it:
"Malta Spitfire" by George Beurling and Leslie Roberts

ploughman
05-12-2005, 04:32 PM
Speaking of VCs isn't Canada the county with VC street, where (not sure) two or three houses were home to VC winners? Do you guys still have the VC as your highest honour? I was sorry to hear the Aussies moved on from the VC and have their own gong now, not that I feel any animosity to them going their own way and cutting some more of their remaining links to the UK and the Commonwealth (not that it would matter even if I did), but I always thought Commonwealth countries had at least this one thing in common, we knew what a VC meant.

Grenada, a tiny Carribean Island recently flattened by a hurricane, recently had a national holiday because one of their sons won a VC in Iraq, and all us Commonwealth types know what a VC means and why they decided to have a party. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

altstiff
05-12-2005, 08:38 PM
Yes we still use the VC.

http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/remembers/sub.cfm?source=collections/cmdp/mainmenu/group02/canvc

Also, did a little test here at home. Asked my dad and a couple of uncles (all born in the 41-44 range) and none knew who George Beurling was.

Ask my uncle Aylmer (who see action in WW2 and is my dad's brother) and he knew exactly who he was.

Funny thing, both my dad and uncles said their brother Aylmer would not know who he was (i bet he would have). They said with his failing memory he would not remember. The old boy did me proud again!

I did a page about my uncle Aylemr for those interested in seeing some WWII story's and pics>>>

http://www.virtual-speed.com/stiff/aylmer/aylmer.htm

SpartanHoplite
05-12-2005, 08:55 PM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
Speaking of VCs isn't Canada the county with VC street, where (not sure) two or three houses were home to VC winners? Do you guys still have the VC as your highest honour? I was sorry to hear the Aussies moved on from the VC and have their own gong now, not that I feel any animosity to them going their own way and cutting some more of their remaining links to the UK and the Commonwealth (not that it would matter even if I did), but I always thought Commonwealth countries had at least this one thing in common, we knew what a VC meant.

Grenada, a tiny Carribean Island recently flattened by a hurricane, recently had a national holiday because one of their sons won a VC in Iraq, and all us Commonwealth types know what a VC means and why they decided to have a party. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

True. We even have a little "Heritage Canada" commercial run by the government to promote it (along with other Canadiana like inventing penicillin and Winni the Pooh and things like that). All those VC winners you are mentioning above are guys from the same street in Winnipeg, as a recall.

And, for those who might be interested, Canadian WW1 Victoria Cross winners, from http://www.rootsweb.com/~ww1can/vc.htm?o_xid=0039432393&o_lid=0039432393

CANADIAN VICTORIA CROSS WINNERS, WORLD WAR 1:

Algie, Wallace Lloyd (1891-1918)
Barker, William George (1894-1930)
Barron, Colin Fraser (1893-1958)
Bellew, Edward Donald (1882-1961)
Brent, Philip Eric (1891-1917)
Bishop, William Avery (1894-1956)
Bourke, Rowland Richard Louis (1885-1958)
Breton, Alexander Picton (1892-1976)
Brillant, Jean (1890-1918)
Brown, Harry (1898-1917)
Cairns, Hugh (1896-1918)
Campbell, Frederick William (1867-1915)
Clark, Leo (1892-1916)
Clark-Kennedy, William Hew (1880-1961)
Combe, Robert Grierson (1880-1917)
Coppins, Frederick George (1889-1963)
Croak, John Bernard (1892-1918)
De Wind, Edmund (1883-1918)
Dinesen, Thomas (1892-1979)
Fisher, Fred (1894-1915)
Flowerdew, Gordon Muriel (1885-1918)
Good, Herman James (1887-1969)
Gregg, Milton Fowler (1892-1978)
Hall, Frederick William (1885-1915)
Hanna, Robert (1887-1967)
Harvey, Frederick Maurice Watson (1888-1980)
Hobson, Frederick (1875-1917)
Holmes, Thomas William (1898-1950)
Honey, Samuel Lewis (1894-1918)
Hutcheson, Bellenden Seymour (1883-1954)
Kaeble, Joseph (1893-1918)
Kerr, George Fraser (1894-1929)
Kerr, John Chipman (1887-1963)
Kinross, Cecil John (1896-1957)
Knight, Arthur George (1886-1918)
Konowal, Filip (1887-1959)
Learmonth, Okill Massey (1894-1917)
Lyall, Graham Thomson (1892-1941)
MacDowell, Thain Wendell (1890-1960)
MacGregor, John (1888-1952)
McKean, George Burdon (1888-1926)
MacKenzie, Hugh (1885-1917)
McLeod, Alan Arnett (1899-1918)
Merrifield, William (1890-1943)
Metcalf, William Henry (1885-1968)
Milne, William Johnstone (1892-1917)
Miner, Harry Garnet Bedford (1891-1918)
Mitchell, Coulson Norman (1889-1978)
Mullin, George (1892-1963)
Nunney, Claude (1892-1918)
O'Kelly, Christopher Patrick John (1895-1922)
O'Leary, Michael (1889-1961)
O'Rourke, Michael James (1878-1957)
Pattison, John George (1875-1917)
Pearkes, George Randolph (1888-1984)
Peck, Cyrus Wesley (1871-1956)
Rayfield, Walter Leigh (1881-1949)
Richardson, James Cleland (1895-1916)
Ricketts, Thomas (1901-1967)
Robertson, James Peter (1883-1917)
Rutherford, Charles Smith (1892-1989)
Scrimger, Francis Alexander Caron (1881-1937)
Shankland, Robert (1887-1968)
Sifton, Ellis Wellwood (1891-1917)
Spall, Robert (1890-1918)
Strachan, Harcus (1889-1982)
Tait, James Edward (1886-1918)
Train, Charles William (1890-1965)
Young, John Francis (1893-1929)
Zengel, Raphael Louis (1894-1977)

SpartanHoplite
05-12-2005, 09:02 PM
And, just out of curiosity, some things I stumbled across on the internet involving Canadian aces, WW1 and WW2:


Top 12 Aces of WW1:
M. von Richthofen (Germany) 80 kills ~ The Red Baron
R. Fonck (France) 75 kills
E. Mannock (Britain) 73 kills
William Avery Bishop aka Billy Bishop (Canada) 72 kills
E. Udet (Germany) 62 kills
Ramond Collishaw (Canada) 60 kills
J. McCudden (Britain) 57 kills
A. Beauchamp Proctor (Britain) 54 kills
D. MacLaren (Canada) 54 kills
G. Guynemer (France) 54 kills
William George Barker (Canada) 53 kills
E. Lowenhardt (Germany) 53 kills

Not too shabby for us Canucks! And no need to get into the "Did Brown shoot down the Red Baron" discussion, at that. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

According to http://www.around.ntl.sympatico.ca/~toby/ww2.html, there were 142 Canadian aces in WWII. Thirty-two of these aces shot down ten or more aircraft. The top five aces were:

"Screwball" George Beurling - 32 kills
"Woody" Vernon Woodward - 21 kills
Henry McLeod - 21 kills
Mark Brown - 18.5 kills
William McKnight - 16.5 kills

Just for those who were wondering. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

SH

altstiff
05-12-2005, 09:03 PM
I think Dr.Banting of the U of T invented Insulin.......

SpartanHoplite
05-12-2005, 09:27 PM
Originally posted by altstiff:
I think Dr.Banting of the U of T invented Insulin.......

Yeah, you're right, of course!

Anyway,
http://jpgleize.club.fr/aces/ww2can.htm seems to list a whole lot of Canadian aces. I don't know if the list is comprehensive.

SH

gkll
05-13-2005, 01:15 AM
Thanks to those who posted some links... always appreciated.

Pirschjaeger
05-13-2005, 01:56 AM
Hey, this is a cool thead, and very informative.

As for William Shatner, well,......... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif I wish Don Cherry would have followed his tracks. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

As for the thing about Canadians being shy about themselves, I think it has to do a little with the US and our own identity.

When I meet someone outside of N.A. and they say there is no difference between Canada and the US, it annoys me a little. Not because because of negative feelings toward the US but simply because we like our identity. Most Canadians have American relatives making the Americans like cousins to us.

It's no different than saying the people are the same in the UK countries, German speaking countries, African or Asian countries. People have pride in there uniqueness, even Canadians. So I think the shyness of Canadians has a lot to do with the not so shy Americans. Also this is why the two government often choose not to agree and most political issues.

But Canadians should take more time to learn about themselves and not worry about what others say. There is nothing wrong with moderate national pride. Of course the extremes, especially in the past, have proven to be not so good for the world.

My post has nothing to do with politics and I hope no one turns it that way. This thread has been interesting and informative. It's just my opinion as to why the Canadians seem to be shy. It's all relative to our our closest family, our American cousins and that we like to keep our identity as Canadians.

Thanks to all those who are supplying the education. Let's learn more. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz Franzen

Freelancer-1
05-13-2005, 03:00 AM
Well put, Fritz http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

dolphin2_384
05-13-2005, 03:36 AM
We've had this Spitfire ace show on UK television- it's very good with some nice photography and moving stories from the sons and daughters of veterans. True it is a little too "reality tv" orientated but poses interesting moral questions about todays politically correct society. By the way Rommel's staff car was strafed by Sqn Ldr Chris Le Roux, a Canadian with 2nd Tactical Air Force.

Tallyho1961
05-13-2005, 08:46 AM
Nice job up above Fritz - that about sums it up.

As for Canadian military accomplishments: Vimy Ridge (WWI), Ortona (WWII, Italy) and the clearing of the Scheldt (WWII, Holland) first some to mind. And of course, ill-fated Dieppe.

In fact, Princess Margaret of the Netherlands is in Montreal this week and just paid a visit to our local veterans hospital.

And since entertainers are mixed up in this thread, lest we forget:
Neil Young
Jim Carrey
Michael J. Fox
Joni Mitchell
Dan Aykroyd
Pamela Anderson (sorry, I had to)

Canadians all, although not always recognized as such. I'm sure someone will fill in more.

Pirschjaeger
05-13-2005, 11:41 AM
Kim Mitchel
Christopher Plummer
Burton *******s
Keanu Reeves
Fritz Franzen
Shania Twain
Shannon Tweed
Nelly Furtado
Leonard Cohen
Many more

Tallyho1961
05-13-2005, 11:49 AM
Well done http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

Wayne Gretsky
Maurice Richard
Jean Beliveau
Gordie Howe
Bobby Hull
Bobby Orr
David Suzuki
Avril Lavigne
Howie Mandel
Mike Myers
Martin Short
Brendan Fraser
Phil Hartman
Lorne Greene
Michael Ironside
Kiefer Sutherland
Donald Sutherland

Didn't know Keanu was one of ours http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Pirschjaeger
05-13-2005, 11:49 AM
Top Ten Myths About Canada and Canadians


We live in igloos: We live in houses, and they are very well built houses.


Canadians do not have the same technology as Americans: Canadians have access to the
same technology as Americans and the rest of the civilized world.


There is snow everywhere all year long: Anyone who has spent a summer in Vancouver,
Toronto, or Montreal will strongly disagree with this.


We don't get the same movies Americans do: We get the same movies, on the same day,
and our censorship is less severe. Furthermore, the Paramount theater in Montreal is
the most attended and most lucrative movie theater in North-America.


Canada does not have a film industry: We have a thriving film industry, and many of the
syndicated US TV shows, not to mention major studio motion pictures are filmed here. Canada is
renowned to have some of the best production crews in the world.


Canadians all say "eh" and "aboot": Sure, some of us do, but Canada is a big country with
many different people who speak many different languages with different dialects.


Everyone in Quebec speaks French: Although a large percentage of the Province's
population is Francophone, there is also a large number of Anglophones and Allophones.


Canadians have fewer guns than Americans: Canadians have just as many, if not more; we just
have fewer murders.


Canada's national sport is Hockey: Not completely true. While Hockey is very popular, and considered our national pastime, our national sport is Lacrosse. Oh, and we invented Baseball and basketball too.


Canadians policemen are all Mounties dressed in red uniforms: Our cops are the same
as American cops. The Mounties usually only dress up in red for for special occasions.

Pirschjaeger
05-13-2005, 11:51 AM
Top Ten Canadian Inventions
In no particular order, and yes; we know there are many more...


AM radio
Invented by :
Guglielmo Marconi


IMAX projector and system
Invented by :
Graeme Ferguson,
Roman Kroitor
and Robert Kerr


Telephone
Invented by :
Alexander Graham Bell


Television
Invented by :
Reginald A. Fessenden


Zipper
Invented by :
Gideon Sundback


Music Synthesizer
Invented by:
Hugh LeCaine


Electron microscope
Invented by :
Eli Franklin Burton,
Cecil Hall,
James Hillier,
and Albert Prebus


Trivial Pursuit
Invented by :
Chris Haney
and Scott Abbott


Basketball
Invented by :
James Naismith


Canadarm
Invented by :
Spar Aerospace Ltd

Too many more so I'll just add the link;

http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa090100a.htm

Fritz Franzen

Tallyho1961
05-13-2005, 12:02 PM
Keanu and the zipper?

Here's to the true north: strong, heavily taxed, and free. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Fritz: are you a Montrealer?

Pirschjaeger
05-13-2005, 12:25 PM
Originally posted by Tallyho1961:
Keanu and the zipper?

Here's to the true north: strong, heavily taxed, and free. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Fritz: are you a Montrealer?

Nope, was born in Toronto and moved to Nova Scotia when I was 7. Before I left Canada I had live the last 5 years back in Toronto.

Where ya from? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Ha ha ha, for non-Canadians, "where ya from?" is the first thing a Canadian will ask you once they got your name. Don't be afraid. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz Franzen

SpartanHoplite
05-13-2005, 01:42 PM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Top Ten Canadian Inventions
In no particular order, and yes; we know there are many more...


AM radio
Invented by :
Guglielmo Marconi

Marconi was Italian, not Canadian. He just tested his radio from Newfoundland. Which wasn't even part of Canada at the time.

SH

altstiff
05-13-2005, 05:13 PM
Hey, what about the late JOHN CANDY!

Maybe one of the coolest Canadians.....

jensenpark
05-13-2005, 08:40 PM
Originally posted by dolphin2_384:
We've had this Spitfire ace show on UK television- it's very good with some nice photography and moving stories from the sons and daughters of veterans. True it is a little too "reality tv" orientated but poses interesting moral questions about todays politically correct society. By the way Rommel's staff car was strafed by Sqn Ldr Chris Le Roux, a Canadian with 2nd Tactical Air Force.

One more bit of trivia...Rommel's car was spotted and called in by a Cdn Spit pilot by the name of Richard Rohmer. Rohmer later went on to become a general and a very prolific author. Rohmer is often credited (eroneously though) with straffing Rommel.

jensenpark
05-13-2005, 08:40 PM
PS: Fritz, come home!!!

Pirschjaeger
05-14-2005, 01:22 AM
Originally posted by jensenpark:
PS: Fritz, come home!!!

Ha ha ha, well, in a few months I'll leave China and move to Germany. I'll stay there for a few years. Who knows, maybe home after that.

Honestly, not to put down other countries, all have there beauty spots, but IMHO there is no better country than Canada. It's a shame we never realize this until we leave. I do miss home but got things to do.

Oh Canada! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

A Molson Canadian would be good right aboot now. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz Franzen

Tallyho1961
05-14-2005, 08:43 AM
I'm in Montreal. English parents, however.

What fuels the globetrotting? Is it work, or are you in happy circumstances that permit you to pick and choose where you park your boots?

Nice burst of Canadiana you stirred up, BTW http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Pirschjaeger
05-14-2005, 08:48 PM
Hi Tally,

Well, it's actually kinda strange. I was just thinking about this the other day as a matter of fact and it occurred to me it was a childhood dream forgotten but not subconsciously I guess.

When I was a child one of my favorite shows was "Cutter's Goose". Remember it? It inspired me. I remember thinking that when I grow up, I wanted to live and work in different countries around the world, especially very foreign countries. I also wanted to get into international business and politics to that would support living and working in Germany as a German. To top it all off, I wanted a German "better-half" to grow old with. BTW, before anyone jumps on to the wrong wagon, I'm far from racist. I've had Asian, Black, White, Arab, and Indian girl friends. All people are the same, even dogs and cats can't see the difference.

Well, here we are in 2005, some 30 years after my vision. I have lived in Egypt and have been living in China for 5 years now. I work for an American bank and a Chinese company. We are involved in finance and economics in China but cannot give details; it's quite political. We're mostly involved in economic development especially in the poorer areas. I'm also involved in importing and exporting support jointly by the bank and the Chinese company.

Recently I found out I was also a German citizen by default simply because my father only became a Canadian citizen when I was 10. This gives me the priviledge of holding two passports. It very useful in my business. I can live in 26 countries without requiring a visa.

I recently spent four months in Germany and unexpectedly met the woman of my dreams. She is perfect and waiting. I've hired someone who will come to China to cover my Asian responsibilities. I will move my office to Germany expand my business into Europe this year. My next goal will be N.A. and the African continent.

So, basically it seems I'll get everything I wanted. It's been a hard go at times but I've learnt a lot and have seen a lot. I've done many things from driving truck to graphic artist to industrial machine technolgy. International business seems to be my "thing" now. Later I plan to be involved in politics in Germany, behind the scenes.

I am proud to be both Canadian and German. Once I am in Germany I will frequently visit Canada and my family.

I never had a better reason to move to another country other than "Because I haven't been there". But I guess it was a dream buried sub-consciously.

Fritz Franzen

Pirschjaeger
05-14-2005, 08:56 PM
BTW Tally, I've never been to Montreal except to drive through a few times on my way to Toronto. I have heard many good things about it though and plan to visit sometime.

Once I'm settle in Germany I want to plan a "round the world in 80 days" vacation. I'll go with my gf(maybe wife by this time http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif) by train from Berlin to Moscow, jump on the Trans-Siberian to Beijing, fly to Vancouver and take the train to Halifax. From Halifax rent a car and head to Newfoundland then back to Halifax to catch a flight back to Germany. Should be cool since she's had little chance to travel.

Montreal and Newfoundland are on my list of "must see" places.

Fritz Franzen

Waldo.Pepper
05-14-2005, 09:14 PM
Originally posted by SpartanHoplite:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Top Ten Canadian Inventions
In no particular order, and yes; we know there are many more...


AM radio
Invented by :
Guglielmo Marconi

Radio was noit even invented by Marconi. It was

REGINALD FESSENDEN

See

http://collections.ic.gc.ca/heirloom_series/volume4/42-45.htm



Marconi was Italian, not Canadian. He just tested his radio from Newfoundland. Which wasn't even part of Canada at the time.

SH </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

jensenpark
05-14-2005, 09:22 PM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
BTW Tally, I've never been to Montreal except to drive through a few times on my way to Toronto. I have heard many good things about it though and plan to visit sometime.

Once I'm settle in Germany I want to plan a "round the world in 80 days" vacation. I'll go with my gf(maybe wife by this time http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif) by train from Berlin to Moscow, jump on the Trans-Siberian to Beijing, fly to Vancouver and take the train to Halifax. From Halifax rent a car and head to Newfoundland then back to Halifax to catch a flight back to Germany. Should be cool since she's had little chance to travel.

Montreal and Newfoundland are on my list of "must see" places.

Fritz Franzen

Having lived in Newfoundland for two years I can tell you it can be a pretty cool place to visit - for a week. Be careful what week you choose, as the other 51 are full of snow or rain or fog. And sometimes on the same day. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Pirschjaeger
05-14-2005, 09:22 PM
Thx for the correction Waldo. I just simply copied and pasted from a website, didn't bother reading it to much. Besides, I alsways thought the TV was invented by a Scot.

Even more interesting, the TV camera was invented something like 7 years after the TV. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

What did they do, watch DVD's until someone invented a camera? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif


Fritz Franzen

Pirschjaeger
05-14-2005, 09:24 PM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Thx for the correction Waldo. I just simply copied and pasted from a website, didn't bother reading it to much. Besides, I alsways thought the TV was invented by a Scot.

Even more interesting, the TV camera was invented something like 7 years after the TV. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

What did they do, watch DVDs until someone invented a camera? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif


BTW Waldo, there's a complete "Black widow" sitting her in Beijing, on it's landing gear. If you're interested I'll try to find the link to the pics.



Fritz Franzen

Pirschjaeger
05-16-2005, 12:28 AM
Originally posted by jensenpark:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
BTW Tally, I've never been to Montreal except to drive through a few times on my way to Toronto. I have heard many good things about it though and plan to visit sometime.

Once I'm settle in Germany I want to plan a "round the world in 80 days" vacation. I'll go with my gf(maybe wife by this time http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif) by train from Berlin to Moscow, jump on the Trans-Siberian to Beijing, fly to Vancouver and take the train to Halifax. From Halifax rent a car and head to Newfoundland then back to Halifax to catch a flight back to Germany. Should be cool since she's had little chance to travel.

Montreal and Newfoundland are on my list of "must see" places.

Fritz Franzen

Having lived in Newfoundland for two years I can tell you it can be a pretty cool place to visit - for a week. Be careful what week you choose, as the other 51 are full of snow or rain or fog. And sometimes on the same day. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ha ha ha, Jenson, I spent a few years on the North Atlantic, Newfoundland weather, I'm sure, is a little more user-friendly. The things that happen on the ocean regarding weather can be really amazing and sudden. I really miss those days. I love extreme weather, especially at sea. It's much more exciting than a rollercoaster and you get paid to do it. My attitute to bad weather has always been "bring it on" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/icon_twisted.gif

BTW, during your stay on the rock did you run across any "mummers"? There's always warm houses, warm hearts, and cold beer on the rock, regardless the weather. All hail the Newfies! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz Franzen

FCU2
05-25-2005, 11:41 AM
Howdy Boys,
Joe here from acesofww2.com, wanna know about canadian Aces in WW2? Check out:
http://www.acesofww2.com/Canada/Canada.htm
I dont have every Ace bio'd but i'm workin on it. BTW, Beurling was the ONLY allied pilot to outscore his axis counterpart in any theater during ww2. Over the hotly contested skies of Malta, "screwball" got 28 kills. The highest scoring German over the island was Gerhard Michalski with 26. Beurling never graduated high school.
Rommel was taken out of the war by Charlie Fox.
there's a link to the story at the bottom of the canadian aces page.
Canadians, like in ww1, kicked major *** in the skies over europe. Consistently being the highest scoring squadrons in the air until 1945

jensenpark
05-25-2005, 07:15 PM
Hey Fritz:

Never ran accross the 'mummers'. There is an amazing amount of live/alternative theatre for such a small city as St. John's though. Wonder if it evolved from that?

Yup, people there are great, and fun to party with. Just couldn't handle the weather.
I remember the May long weekend back in 2001. I was just getting ready to go to Halifax (where it was sunny and 30 celcius) for a conference and waiting for my wife to come home with the kids to drive me. 3rd week of May and it was snowing hard.
I hear a loud kicking at the door and open it to see her in tears - 2 feet of fresh snow outside and the car stuck in the snowbank also known as our driveway.
"I'm leaving you and taking the kids to Victoria" was all she said.
Luckily we eventually found out way back home to Victoria so don't have to put up with the Atlantic weather anymore.

Pirschjaeger
05-25-2005, 09:44 PM
You and your family moved from BC to Nfdl? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif There's a difference between having 300 days of rain annually and having 300 days of snow annually. But I guess you know that now. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

The "Mummers" originate from either English or Irish culture, I can't remember which. Most people don't know it but the Newfies are all decendants of the Irish and English, henceforth the two accents today. "Mummering" in the UK has died out and vanished from the UK culture.

Did you know the fastest growing language per capita in Canada is Gaelic? In Cape Breton there is atleast one Gaelic language school. The Highland games are growing in attendance and participation too.

I always have a little chuckle when Europeans tell me Canadians have no culture. I always tell them, "not only have we developed our own culture, but we practice yours more than you
". But it is typical of immigrants to care more about their culture in the new land.

Growing up in a German family in Canada, I was surprised to see the lack of German culture in Germany.

Fritz