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AlGroover
10-30-2004, 11:59 PM
I hope someone around here can help me because I've run into a blank wall elsewhere in trying to get some information on my grandfather's WW1 service. He was born 1901, lied about his age, left an apprenticeship with Wolesley and became an aircraft mechanic with the RFC. The next part is hard to verify. According to my mother, he was posted to Oranmore in Ireland! Was this a training squadron or perhaps a submarine hunting unit? If the latter, wouldn't it be the responsibility of the RNAS, particularly at a time (1916-17?) that the RNAS was lending Sopwith triplanes to the RFC in France? And why Oranmore at the eastern end of Galway bay, so fay from the open ocean? Later he also served as observer in France, a not uncommon occurrence for ground crew according to Ralph Barker's book 'The Royal Flying Corps in World War 1'. I would appreciate any clues anyone could give me.

AlGroover
10-30-2004, 11:59 PM
I hope someone around here can help me because I've run into a blank wall elsewhere in trying to get some information on my grandfather's WW1 service. He was born 1901, lied about his age, left an apprenticeship with Wolesley and became an aircraft mechanic with the RFC. The next part is hard to verify. According to my mother, he was posted to Oranmore in Ireland! Was this a training squadron or perhaps a submarine hunting unit? If the latter, wouldn't it be the responsibility of the RNAS, particularly at a time (1916-17?) that the RNAS was lending Sopwith triplanes to the RFC in France? And why Oranmore at the eastern end of Galway bay, so fay from the open ocean? Later he also served as observer in France, a not uncommon occurrence for ground crew according to Ralph Barker's book 'The Royal Flying Corps in World War 1'. I would appreciate any clues anyone could give me.

Inadaze
10-31-2004, 05:02 AM
The National Archives have a good site

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/

I don't know how much information you can get off the web, but the site does have info on how to research and where documents can be found.

Here's what a search for RFC came up with in the archive (http://www.catalogue.nationalarchives.gov.uk/rdleaflet.asp?sLeafletURL=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Ecatal ogue%2Enationalarchives%2Egov%2Euk%2FLeaflets%2Fri 2049%2Ehtm&lBack=-1)
Good Luck

Inadaze

berg417448
10-31-2004, 08:25 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by AlGroover:
I hope someone around here can help me because I've run into a blank wall elsewhere in trying to get some information on my grandfather's WW1 service. He was born 1901, lied about his age, left an apprenticeship with Wolesley and became an aircraft mechanic with the RFC. The next part is hard to verify. According to my mother, he was posted to Oranmore in Ireland! Was this a training squadron or perhaps a submarine hunting unit? If the latter, wouldn't it be the responsibility of the RNAS, particularly at a time (1916-17?) that the RNAS was lending Sopwith triplanes to the RFC in France? And why Oranmore at the eastern end of Galway bay, so fay from the open ocean? Later he also served as observer in France, a not uncommon occurrence for ground crew according to Ralph Barker's book 'The Royal Flying Corps in World War 1'. I would appreciate any clues anyone could give me. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Did a search for RFC Oranmore and found this:

"The roots of aviation history in this region can be traced back for over 80 years, to the days of the Royal Flying Corps. The original Galway aerodrome, Oranmore, was one of the eight sites selected in 1917 to provide for a massive extension of flying training to feed the ever growing need for operational pilots in France. In the event, Oranmore became a Royal Air Force base for four years between 1918 and 1922, hosting elements of 2, 100, 105 and 106 Squadrons equipped with Bristol F.2B Fighters. "

ELEM
10-31-2004, 08:48 AM
Your first port of call should be the RAF museum at Hendon. If there are surviving documents on your Grandfather they will have them. I got a lot of help from them when I was researching my wifes Grandfather who was a Sopwith Camel pilot who was captured in 1918. But just as helpfull was 'Cross and Cockade International' a magazine devoted to WWI aviation history. I wrote a letter to them which was published, and recieved a photo of my wifes Grandfathers Camel after capture on a German airfield with Albatross fighters in the background! What a treasure! and just from a fellow reader who was a historian too.

AlGroover
11-01-2004, 02:29 AM
Thank you hugely fellas! Am following up on this right now.