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Mike8686
10-25-2004, 01:34 PM
I decided to go for me pilots license, I've been on three flights so far in a Cessna 172 with my instructor, NOTHING compares to the sensation intrinsic to real flight, I LOVE IT! Well anyways, to get to my question, its about Flight Simulator 2004: A century of flight. Obviously as a sim it wont compare with flying, but is it worth getting and does it come with a good dose of realism? In other words, if I choose to fly the 172 in FS2004 will it be completely unreal and stupid or will it be as close to the real thing as virtual reality allows.

Regards,
Mike

Btw: STALLS RULE!

Mike8686
10-25-2004, 01:34 PM
I decided to go for me pilots license, I've been on three flights so far in a Cessna 172 with my instructor, NOTHING compares to the sensation intrinsic to real flight, I LOVE IT! Well anyways, to get to my question, its about Flight Simulator 2004: A century of flight. Obviously as a sim it wont compare with flying, but is it worth getting and does it come with a good dose of realism? In other words, if I choose to fly the 172 in FS2004 will it be completely unreal and stupid or will it be as close to the real thing as virtual reality allows.

Regards,
Mike

Btw: STALLS RULE!

TX-EcoDragon
10-25-2004, 01:46 PM
It will, of course, be handy for practicing instrument procedures (once you have some dual instruction in those procedures so you know more or less how to perform them) when the Instrument rating comes along. In your case, for a VFR pilot, it will still be useful if you want a little fun shooting approaches or working on VOR tracking. I wouldn't say it's going to feel any more "real" than FB, though it will be a more familiar panel and environment.

I guess if I were starting flight training, and I was already a simmer, I can't imagine not picking it up.

FS2004 has pretty good ATC that is better than I have seen in any other sim, though the text popup is a little cumbersome. The weather is pretty good. The weather effects on the aircraft, and FM itself is better in X-plane, but from any other vantage point FS2004 is going to give you better visual representation of the real aircraft, and its instrumentation.

Jagdgeschwader2
10-25-2004, 03:02 PM
I would highly recommend FS2004. Almost all
the airfields of the world are mapped. You can
probably find the airport that you are flying out of now. You can also download current weather conditions while you fly not to
mention that the sim keeps track of the time
of day or night in real time. As for the
default aircraft I do not use them. You need
to get the Real Air SF 260 from Real Air Simulations http://www.realairsimulations.com/.
This aircraft has been reviewed by real pilots and all have agreed that this machine is spot
on. Also the Real Air Super Decathlon if you want to practice flying a tail dragger. The whole point with FS2004 to me is the sim itself not the planes that come with it. Microsoft knows that other developers will spend the time to make sure the flight models are correct so they don't have to. You just need to get FS2004
and then get one of the aircraft from Real Air Simlulations. The SF260 is the one that I would train with. It's a lot hotter than a Cessna 172 but it has a tricycle gear and the same basic instrumentation. I have tried a lot of add on aircraft and nothing compares to Real Air Simulations. Their flight models are used by
Melbourne based Aerospace Industry Training Centre, Kangan Batman TAFE. In fact you can download the fm for the default Cessna 172 for free at the Real Air Simulations page. I would still recommend the SF 260 though it is a more polished model. Like they say nothing is really free. Oh and I forgot to mention you can change
the load out for the aircraft including fuel
and passengers.

Here is what they say:
Kangan Batman TAFE Cessna 172 €" FS2004 VERSION

Commissioned by the Melbourne based Aerospace Industry Training Centre, Kangan Batman TAFE, this custom built flight model with custom livery and sounds is used by the Melbourne Training Centre for ab initio pilot training. It will side slip and spin.

My SF260:
http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/sf260f.jpg

Cockpit:
http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/sf260.jpg


Super Decathlon:
http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/124.jpg

Cessna 310 at Love Field Dallas,Tx
http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/310d.jpg

King Air:
http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/111.jpg

Cockpit:
http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/1111.jpg
http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/real.jpg

http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/jagdgeschwader2s.jpg

PBNA-Boosher
10-25-2004, 03:46 PM
I soloed last June. It's great! I plan to get my license later this year. I'm on cross country now. Good luck to you! It's a hell of a lot of fun.

LStarosta
10-25-2004, 05:11 PM
Whatever you do, don't get complacent or feel that you are becoming familiar with flying in its entirety. Remember, even professional pilots use printed out and laminated checklists, all the more reason for you to do the same. A pint of sweat will save a gallon of blood.

nickdanger3
10-25-2004, 06:14 PM
I just bought some Ch pedals on ebay anbd the seller threw in FS2004.

Speaking as a non-pilot it seems that it can only help in learning how to fly for real.

I think that if you already have a trackir (i do) then FS2004 would be a great purchase.

T_O_A_D
10-25-2004, 06:42 PM
so it supports trackir too? If so I might get it. Been thinking of it, for awhile.

LuckyBoy1
10-25-2004, 07:08 PM
If for nothing else, it is good for the airports. You'd think your problems would be over with after you hit the numbers; but no, now it's time to step lively to avoid being blown away by the wash from a DC-10! He's thinking. "I fly out of small airports and this will never happen to me"! Well, think again. I landed at a small conctrete strip with 6 foot deep pot holes in it at a place called Treasure Key in the Bahamas. The controller says, "Like man... 2071Wiskey X-ray, you are cleared for inside pattern in front of the Bahama's Air DC-10 to land first". I thought he was joking... nope maybe he was smoking... but he wasn't joking!

Then it's good for helping in the basics of knowing when it's IFR conditions or if VFR will do. The Kennedy boy thought he had it scoped out and he was wrong. You can use the game to pull all your stupid, "what if" tricks and live to tell about it.

Then it's good for just knowing the layout of a plane you might be renting... or in my case back in the Army we called it "appropriating equipment without perfect paperwork"!

As far as simulating flight, especially flight under conditions that lead to disaster... like going over the top rated speed of the Beechcraft Bonanza V tail; well, it will probably give you some sort of physical warning in the game like a vibration or something. Guess what? In real life, your first clue beyind watching the air speed indicator is when the tail rips off!

Still, I think you'd find trhe game fun and usefull. And the av-gas costs a lot less too!

WTE_Galway
10-25-2004, 08:15 PM
practice with FS2004 by all means .. its quite useful

however do not be deceived by the advertising that claims its "spot on" that is rubbish

among other things its behaviour in final flare and landing is out and anything "out of the envelop" including quite mild stuff like incipient spin, stalls and spiral dives is quite scatty

in actual fact I personally find flying circuits and touch and goes in an emil in FB more useful than FS2004 for circuit training http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

cireback
10-25-2004, 08:43 PM
I have flown lots of FS2004 (as well as 2002 and 98) and the first time i went up i was so comfortable flying the thing. Everything from the sim seemed to be the same, except maybe the turbulence hehe. I hear a lot of people fly the route they will be taking during the next lesson so they are familiar with it.