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Clan_Graham
04-16-2005, 11:32 AM
I've been flying in this game since IL-2 first hit the shelves and last night I had the greatest 20 minutes I've ever had in the game.
I got involved in a 1 on 1 dogfight with a pilot who had skills equall to my own. (I'm not saying I'm a great pilot or a bad pilot...he just had skills equall to my own)
I was in a 109G-6, he was in a Spit.
We flew around each other for what seemed like forever trying to get position or an advantage. Everything I tried, he countered and everything he tried I was able to counter.
We danced around for almost 10 minutes before either of us even fired a shot! It was AMAZING! I started to think that I may run out of fuel!
Eventually though, he made a bit of a mistake and gave me the low, blind left side.
A quick burst and it was done.

Now here's the funny thing. While flying back to base I started actually feeling bad for shooting him down!
Call it survivors guilt or whatever...but I felt sorry for killing him.

And the crappy part is this...I was so wrapped up in what had happened that I didn't think to catch the pilots name!!!!!!!!!
(no icons)

Anyway, if you happen to read this you'll know who you are.
My hats off to you Sir!
~S~...and thanks for the best 20 minutes I have EVER spent in this game !!!!!

Clan_Graham
04-16-2005, 11:32 AM
I've been flying in this game since IL-2 first hit the shelves and last night I had the greatest 20 minutes I've ever had in the game.
I got involved in a 1 on 1 dogfight with a pilot who had skills equall to my own. (I'm not saying I'm a great pilot or a bad pilot...he just had skills equall to my own)
I was in a 109G-6, he was in a Spit.
We flew around each other for what seemed like forever trying to get position or an advantage. Everything I tried, he countered and everything he tried I was able to counter.
We danced around for almost 10 minutes before either of us even fired a shot! It was AMAZING! I started to think that I may run out of fuel!
Eventually though, he made a bit of a mistake and gave me the low, blind left side.
A quick burst and it was done.

Now here's the funny thing. While flying back to base I started actually feeling bad for shooting him down!
Call it survivors guilt or whatever...but I felt sorry for killing him.

And the crappy part is this...I was so wrapped up in what had happened that I didn't think to catch the pilots name!!!!!!!!!
(no icons)

Anyway, if you happen to read this you'll know who you are.
My hats off to you Sir!
~S~...and thanks for the best 20 minutes I have EVER spent in this game !!!!!

T_O_A_D
04-16-2005, 01:00 PM
I wrestled with a TA the other day with a 51. He tried to get me as I had just taken off with no E. He missed I chased him to 30,000 Feet I know not the best place for a 51, But I was up for a challenge. We spent every bit of 20 minutes or more, trading manuvers. Then the dang map changed. I doubt either of us ever got a bullet hole. It was fun for sure.

masaker2005
04-16-2005, 01:06 PM
G http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.giflory to him a? Lol.

CAPT_COTTON
04-16-2005, 03:20 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif

Wasnt me when i encounter an me 109, if i dont get him first shot.I have to run for home or cloud or bridge and call mom for clean shorts he he. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

I had very long fight with a good pilot and he was wounded and running for home got in line behind him and was going to finish him off and the guilt hit me and i flew past and blinked lights and went home http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

I will always think it should have worked!

EnGaurde
04-16-2005, 06:05 PM
back in the real world, there is a thing called the hunters melancholy or hunters remorse.

you spot something in the distance.... you determine the best angle of approach.... you stalk.... inch forward in an agonisingly slow closing maneouver.... the animal lifts its head, you freeze, it resumes grazing, you move.... you close to firing range.... you stand up abruptly, announce your presence loudly whilst shouldering the firearm to give it the obligitory sporting chance to escape... the animals breaks and runs... you track it, and fire.... missed.... begin running..... jumping over tree stumps, rocks, blasting thru foliage... you drop to one knee, exhale completely, steady for another shot... bam.... you hear the bullet strike with a wet thump and the animal falls.... you close in, and deliver the coup de grace...

a few moments later, the thrill of the chase subsides. You examine your kill, and realise how beautifully formed the animal is. Dark eyes, smooth pelt, there is likely a mate somewhere that is now alone.

a tightness constricts your chest and you feel the loss of the animal acutely for a few moments, and despite the fact you took its life a tiny part of you silently wished it would get away.

if anyones ever hunted regularly, then you'll see what i mean.

what you felt, was the thrill of the chase, the sport, and it seemed such an anti climax to shoot down this pilot, you believe he deserved to win.

the catch always is, it would be an incomplete hunt if you did not complete the kill.

such is the tangled web that is our psyche. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

TC_Stele
04-16-2005, 06:10 PM
Perhaps you'd gained a relationship of respect with that pilot and thats why you feel guilty. You guys shared a moment for a long time, I would assume a possibility of guilt.

Freycinet
04-16-2005, 06:13 PM
le petit mort....

EnGaurde
04-16-2005, 06:20 PM
beautiful agony?

be careful what you post hmm?

VELCRO_FLY
04-16-2005, 06:41 PM
Man, after reading this stuff I don't know if I should shoot someone down next time I go up or give him a full "reach around" hug http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

But, really I'm kidding. I know what you mean. I am not a good enough pilot to engage someone for that long yet, but I am trying. I am however an avid hunter and I have let several large whitetail buck walk away at the end of a long track. It's cliche, but it really is the thrill of the chase that I get off on. If I can out-wit an animal in his home I feel like I have achieved something special.

Now having said that, since I am still not a very good pilot I am going to try my best to kill you in the air. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

HotelBushranger
04-17-2005, 08:18 AM
Perhaps Graham, if you Saluted him he would have responded, and you would have gotten you're name.

But yes, I know perfectly what you mean http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Fascinating thing, humans are.

raaaid
04-17-2005, 08:58 AM
for a while i would fly online with no shooting at all

i would remain behind someone for as long as possible outmanoubering all time

the problem is that you have to take all your foe energy to do this and soon youll get someone behind you

it was fun though but with high energy scissors are very efective

i would like this game better if you could get in someone 6 no shooting and his not being able to take you off even with high energy

Clan_Graham
04-17-2005, 09:21 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by HotelBushranger:
Perhaps Graham, if you Saluted him he would have responded, and you would have gotten you're name.

But yes, I know perfectly what you mean http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Fascinating thing, humans are. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


I did send him a ~S~ but there must have been some heavy action going on elsewhere on the map because the text was scrolling pretty quickly.
And as I said, I didn't think to keep an eye on it for his reply.
Wish I had though.

Oilburner_TAW
04-17-2005, 10:43 AM
The same thing happened to me in a coop. I was in a spit and shot down a 109 who was using the same tactic I use in a 109 when I get a spit on my tale (aggressive circling climb forcing spit to disengage or stall). I though how easily that could have been me. On another note, I don't know if this is good or bad, just honest: I have never felt any "online remorse" for shooting down a Japanese plane. I have unconciously developed two seperate engagement rules: one for Japanese and one for everybody else.

Gato__Loco
04-17-2005, 11:28 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by EnGaurde:
back in the real world, there is a thing called the hunters melancholy or hunters remorse.

you spot something in the distance.... you determine the best angle of approach.... you stalk.... inch forward in an agonisingly slow closing maneouver.... the animal lifts its head, you freeze, it resumes grazing, you move.... you close to firing range.... you stand up abruptly, announce your presence loudly whilst shouldering the firearm to give it the obligitory sporting chance to escape... the animals breaks and runs... you track it, and fire.... missed.... begin running..... jumping over tree stumps, rocks, blasting thru foliage... you drop to one knee, exhale completely, steady for another shot... bam.... you hear the bullet strike with a wet thump and the animal falls.... you close in, and deliver the coup de grace...

a few moments later, the thrill of the chase subsides. You examine your kill, and realise how beautifully formed the animal is. Dark eyes, smooth pelt, there is likely a mate somewhere that is now alone.

a tightness constricts your chest and you feel the loss of the animal acutely for a few moments, and despite the fact you took its life a tiny part of you silently wished it would get away.

if anyones ever hunted regularly, then you'll see what i mean.

what you felt, was the thrill of the chase, the sport, and it seemed such an anti climax to shoot down this pilot, you believe he deserved to win.

the catch always is, it would be an incomplete hunt if you did not complete the kill.

such is the tangled web that is our psyche. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Next time, use a photographic camera instead of a rifle. You'll get the thrill of the chase and the photographs will be proof of your skills as a hunter. At the same time, you will let that beautiful animal live and go back to his/hers mate. Just a thought...

Treetop64
04-17-2005, 11:38 AM
Heh, good story.

That sounds similar to a story I read recently about a somewhat similar encounter that happened during WWII. The following is from the book Flying Aces - Avaition Art of World War II, written by James H. Kitchens:

"NOT MY TURN TO DIE

"Aerial combat is a strange, sometimes surreal, experience, in which the unexplained and the unexplainable recur with surprising frequency. Lt. Robert S. Johnson's encounter with a Fw-190 on 26 June, 1943, was just such an event; it could have come straight out of Ripley's Believe It or Not.

"On 26 June, 1943, P-47C Thunderbolts from the 56th Fighter Group's 61st, 62nd, and 63rd Fighter Squadrons ("Zemke's Wolfpack") were launched from AAF Station Boxted to escort an 8th AF operation against Villacoublay, France. The mission was going smoothly - until the American formation was bounced by Fw-190s from JG 2 and JG 26, which proceeded to shoot down five Thunderbolts and damage seven others, two beyond repair.

"One of the damaged P-47s, the P-47C-2-RE s/n 41-6235 (HV-P Half Pint) belonged to 61st Fighter Squadron pilot Robert S. Johnson, who had won his first victory in the same airplane on 13 June. On the 26th it was a different matter. As Johnson later related in his autobiography, Thunderbolt!, a Fw-190 caught him in his sights and riddled his airplane with machine gun bullets and 20mm cannon shells. One 20mm round exploded in the cockpit, another passed through the rear part of the sliding hood, jamming it closed. Wounded and half-blind, Johnson could not bail out and had to limp home to survive. Any other fighter would probably have gone down, but the Thunderbolt was one tough customer, and now it showed. Half-Pint's engine kept running, there was no fire, and things looked hopeful until another Fw-190 latched onto the crippled American. The German mercilessly hammered the helpless Thunderbolt, exausting his machine gun ammunition without result. According to Johnson, the the astonished and no doubt bewildered German pilot then eased alongside, studied his would-be victim, saluted, and turned away, leaving the shaken American to nurse his flying seive back to Boxted. Lt. Johnson landed safely, returned to operations within a few weeks, and went on to finish the war with twenty-eight victories. Half-Pint never flew again."

Ketalar
04-17-2005, 12:57 PM
Clan_Graham:
I've had that experience too, although it happens very rarely. Those moments really leave an impression, and I always fly home wishing I'd recorded it. But I also leave the combat zone feeling bad whenever I succeed in BnZ'ing someone that obviously doesn't even know I'm coming... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

Crash_Moses
04-17-2005, 03:08 PM
Had an online 'moment' like that too...

Was flying a Corsair over the mountains of Guam. Low clouds, trees bathed in fog. Came up behind and below a lone Zero. Snuck up real quiet like...but he saw me just as I was about to let loose. Spent the next 10 minutes hiding in the clouds and zooming down to tree level to try and catch a glimpse of each other. He finally tagged my engine and I limped away. I'm sure he didn't feel any remorse but we both agreed it was an excellent chase...sigh.

Platypus_1.JaVA
04-17-2005, 03:21 PM
I felt bad when I shot down a teamkiller in a fully laden Il-2... the Coop was running for about 10 minutes and I allready had -400 points...

Covino
04-17-2005, 04:17 PM
I had a similar long duel once. A long time ago, on a full real server, I was flying a 109F and met a Yak (I forget the variant). I normally wouldn't engage in a turn fight but I was not at an advantage and I truly thought I could outturn this fellow.
So we were on the deck and we turned, turned... and turned but neither of us were gaining any ground. I mean, I have not met two more equal pilots. Sometimes one of us would slip up a bit and the other guy might get a few shots off but it seemed the chase would never end.
Friend and foe alike were fighting through our little duel but we kept our eyes focused on each other. We were flying through smoke generated from the wreckages of several duels that began and ended all the while we were turning.
We kept at it for at least 20 minutes, 30 more likely when there was a sudden map change. I was sweating profusely, my wrist had never hurt so much, and my hand was trembling. At the next map, we both eagerly asked, "Who was in that 109/Yak I was turning with?" And we both had a good laugh. I still wonder once in a while who would've won that fight if it wasn't for that map change, but sometimes, I'm glad I don't know... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Aeronautico
04-17-2005, 04:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Gato__Loco:
Next time, use a photographic camera instead of a rifle. You'll get the thrill of the chase and the photographs will be proof of your skills as a hunter. At the same time, you will let that beautiful animal live and go back to his/hers mate. Just a thought... <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
BRAVO! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

I always say the same. You've instantly become my friend. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>You'll get the thrill of the chase and the photographs will be proof of your skills as a hunter. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Plus, they'll be proof of your skills as a photographer and will be a more pleasant trophy than an ex-living ex-beautiful (read: dead) creature. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

stef51
04-17-2005, 06:57 PM
I know the feeling.. I almost cry for real whenever I pounce the unlucky one with ammo while manning the aft turret in my B-25... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

In any case, people who should feel sad are the ones with Ki-84 shooting down people like me online... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Indeed, for the first time ever, one gentleman apologized for shooting my B-25 with his Ki-84. Said it was unfair. I quickly replied that it was my choice to use that plane. If I have a problem with the selection of plane, I just need to find another server.

Everything we do online is our own doing. If you lose a fight, find out why and improve your skill. Losing a fight is the best way to improve in my opinion. So basically you did a favor to him.... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Stephen

EnGaurde
04-17-2005, 08:01 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> have unconciously developed two seperate engagement rules: one for Japanese and one for everybody else <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

that, explains a lot of concepts and attitudes that are best left for other threads.

EnGaurde
04-17-2005, 08:10 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Plus, they'll be proof of your skills as a photographer and will be a more pleasant trophy than an ex-living ex-beautiful (read: dead) creature <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

as much as it makes me seem a monster, its just not the same. Makes it seem much more.... serious? Like buying a motorcycle, starting it up, then shutting it down and calling it a ride day. Or buying your skis, booking a room, going to the snow, and sitting inside all week but still calling yourself a skiier. For the record, i do let most non vermin go. Truly. For foxes, pigs, rabbits, goats.... no mercy.

i guess its a particular kind of pursuit, although not for everyone, not too difficult to understand as everyone feels the thrill of the online chase which i think is very similar.

I know all of you have an appreciation for what im talking about ie stalking, closing in and finally shooting, otherwise you'd all be on the SimCity forums instead. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

HeinzBar
04-18-2005, 07:35 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by EnGaurde:
back in the real world, there is a thing called the hunters melancholy or hunters remorse.

you spot something in the distance.... you determine the best angle of approach.... you stalk.... inch forward in an agonisingly slow closing maneouver.... the animal lifts its head, you freeze, it resumes grazing, you move.... you close to firing range.... you stand up abruptly, announce your presence loudly whilst shouldering the firearm to give it the obligitory sporting chance to escape... the animals breaks and runs... you track it, and fire.... missed.... begin running..... jumping over tree stumps, rocks, blasting thru foliage... you drop to one knee, exhale completely, steady for another shot... bam.... you hear the bullet strike with a wet thump and the animal falls.... you close in, and deliver the coup de grace...

a few moments later, the thrill of the chase subsides. You examine your kill, and realise how beautifully formed the animal is. Dark eyes, smooth pelt, there is likely a mate somewhere that is now alone.

a tightness constricts your chest and you feel the loss of the animal acutely for a few moments, and despite the fact you took its life a tiny part of you silently wished it would get away.

if anyones ever hunted regularly, then you'll see what i mean.

what you felt, was the thrill of the chase, the sport, and it seemed such an anti climax to shoot down this pilot, you believe he deserved to win.

the catch always is, it would be an incomplete hunt if you did not complete the kill.

such is the tangled web that is our psyche. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

S!,
It really is a paradox of emotions for the avid hunter. My profession, wildlife biologist, is directly related to the management of game animals. One of my many jobs is examing the population trends of certain game species.

For many years now, the thrill of the chase and result of a successful hunt has been less satisfying. The taking of life, be it big-game or waterfowl, is needless in this day and age if providing meat is the primary concern. However, I still buy my hunting license every year to support those individuals that hold hunting dear to their hearts. Hunters perform a vital function in today's dysfunctional ecosystems. With the absence of historical predators in most regions, it is left up to humans to perform the duties of alpha predators. For me, time has changed my feelings towards the hunt. The scientist/conservationist in me knows what has to be done, but I no longer have the desire to take the life of my quarry. For me, I actually enjoy just sitting in the stand to observe the multitude of wildlife and the peace that being outdoors brings.

So, I guess the same emotion can be felt while flying in the virtual world. However, keep in mind, your opponent here has countless lives http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

HB

PS, I still love to fish though. Nothing beats presenting the perfect fly for that waiting brown trout http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Klarkash
04-18-2005, 02:55 PM
well, I've just gone and bought a new camera!

is it cheating if I get a 400mm lens of should I stick with the 17 - 88 mm?

CRSutton
04-18-2005, 04:36 PM
Ok everyone, gather around for a group hug! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Iggy-Snaps
04-18-2005, 09:03 PM
S! Maybe it's time for the animals to start thinning out the human population..........Ouch

Diablo310th
04-19-2005, 11:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by EnGaurde:
back in the real world, there is a thing called the hunters melancholy or hunters remorse.

you spot something in the distance.... you determine the best angle of approach.... you stalk.... inch forward in an agonisingly slow closing maneouver.... the animal lifts its head, you freeze, it resumes grazing, you move.... you close to firing range.... you stand up abruptly, announce your presence loudly whilst shouldering the firearm to give it the obligitory sporting chance to escape... the animals breaks and runs... you track it, and fire.... missed.... begin running..... jumping over tree stumps, rocks, blasting thru foliage... you drop to one knee, exhale completely, steady for another shot... bam.... you hear the bullet strike with a wet thump and the animal falls.... you close in, and deliver the coup de grace...

a few moments later, the thrill of the chase subsides. You examine your kill, and realise how beautifully formed the animal is. Dark eyes, smooth pelt, there is likely a mate somewhere that is now alone.

a tightness constricts your chest and you feel the loss of the animal acutely for a few moments, and despite the fact you took its life a tiny part of you silently wished it would get away.

if anyones ever hunted regularly, then you'll see what i mean.

what you felt, was the thrill of the chase, the sport, and it seemed such an anti climax to shoot down this pilot, you believe he deserved to win.

the catch always is, it would be an incomplete hunt if you did not complete the kill.

such is the tangled web that is our psyche. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

very well put and so true. I am a regular hunter and people ahve asked my why I enjoy killing animals. The enjoyment is in the hunt not the kill. The kill is jsut the culmination of the hunt. That and the meat tastes good.

effte
05-02-2005, 02:55 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by EnGaurde:
you stand up abruptly, announce your presence loudly whilst shouldering the firearm to give it the obligitory sporting chance to escape... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You mean "to give it the chance to get injured and possibly slowly die from bleeding, infection or starvation rather than get killed directly through one good clean shot". Very sporting of you. Do you think the animals appreciate it?

If you want the sport of firing at moving targets, do it on the gunnery range. Never voluntarily take a harder shot than necessary just for the challenge if you have the option.

Those are living, breathing animals you're firing at. They can feel pain. Never run a higher risk of causing them pain or suffering than necessary. No real hunter would.

As for those who suggest using a camera: Around here, if we don€t hunt, the populations will grow as there aren€t enough predators around. They will grow until the animals die of starvation, diseases etc in much larger numbers than those killed by rifles today. They will also cause large amounts of damage to crop and forests, get hit by cars to a far larger extent than today, get quite a few drivers killed in the process... and a few people killed by mooses, who can be rather agressive at times. Does that really sound like less suffering to you? But hey, nice pictures!

Oh, not to mention: No meat on the table apart from that coming from the cattle industry... where the animals, as we all know, live happy lives.

I doubt that, with the impact of human civilization on the environment, the number of predators could ever increase to a level where the balance is kept again. Even if it could, I sure wouldn€t want that number of bears out in the woods.

Wow. Hunting philosophy 101. Two billion threads about where the patch is. Nothing more.

I'd say something more to play with seems to be direly needed!

major_setback
05-03-2005, 06:19 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Freycinet:
le petit mort.... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

As Elvis Costello said:

"I've been waiting all my life....for just a little death"


Actually, I think he was talking about something a lot more fun than hunting!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

mortoma
05-03-2005, 03:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Gato__Loco:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by EnGaurde:
back in the real world, there is a thing called the hunters melancholy or hunters remorse.

you spot something in the distance.... you determine the best angle of approach.... you stalk.... inch forward in an agonisingly slow closing maneouver.... the animal lifts its head, you freeze, it resumes grazing, you move.... you close to firing range.... you stand up abruptly, announce your presence loudly whilst shouldering the firearm to give it the obligitory sporting chance to escape... the animals breaks and runs... you track it, and fire.... missed.... begin running..... jumping over tree stumps, rocks, blasting thru foliage... you drop to one knee, exhale completely, steady for another shot... bam.... you hear the bullet strike with a wet thump and the animal falls.... you close in, and deliver the coup de grace...

a few moments later, the thrill of the chase subsides. You examine your kill, and realise how beautifully formed the animal is. Dark eyes, smooth pelt, there is likely a mate somewhere that is now alone.

a tightness constricts your chest and you feel the loss of the animal acutely for a few moments, and despite the fact you took its life a tiny part of you silently wished it would get away.

if anyones ever hunted regularly, then you'll see what i mean.

what you felt, was the thrill of the chase, the sport, and it seemed such an anti climax to shoot down this pilot, you believe he deserved to win.

the catch always is, it would be an incomplete hunt if you did not complete the kill.

such is the tangled web that is our psyche. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Next time, use a photographic camera instead of a rifle. You'll get the thrill of the chase and the photographs will be proof of your skills as a hunter. At the same time, you will let that beautiful animal live and go back to his/hers mate. Just a thought... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Anti-hunting sentiment may seem the wonderful touchy feely way to approach this subject but hunting is not all bad and there can be good come of killing an animal. When I lived in Indiana, there were ( still are ) way too many Whitetail deer. Hunting at least thins over-populated herds and controls their numbers now that there are no longer large predators in states like Indiana, besides coyotes, and they are really medium predators. I knew a guy at work once who had a cousin killed in a car/deer accident, where he was going fast and a whole herd of the critters jumped out in front of him. He lost control by over-reacting and lost his life. Sorry, but I feel more sympathy and compassion towards people than I do
a stupid animal. ( Just a thought!! ) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Yog_Shoggoth
05-03-2005, 07:42 PM
Deer hunting I have no problem with. Fox hunting is a little taboo for me, because they are kind of rare here. Also anything that's not overpopulated or invasive shouldn't be hunted in my opinion, there are too many man made strains to add another. I pheasent hunt here, but they are reintroduced and thriving.

JunkoIfurita
05-05-2005, 03:17 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">S! Maybe it's time for the animals to start thinning out the human population..........Ouch </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Gary Larson was way ahead of you, man http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Gotta watch those cows...
*recalls Far Side cartoon which shows two cows watching chicago go up in a mushroom cloud. One turns to the other and says 'looks like Agent X1452 has done her job'*

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WTE_Dukayn
05-05-2005, 04:51 PM
I chased a 109 in a Spitfire from 4500m down to the deck through about 15 minutes of spiralling and diving to finally catch him in a rare straight-flight moment and managed to take him down. Was one of the best fights I've had, and a hearty ~S~ went to that pilot.