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p51srule
09-24-2008, 11:23 AM
Howdy Ive notice that the earlyer 262s are more manuvarable that the later one with the V tail. So is it just me or is it suppost to be like that.

P51srule http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/metal.gif

JtD
09-24-2008, 11:27 AM
Who knows, the late models are mostly fiction anyway.

p51srule
09-24-2008, 11:35 AM
true, but look at other V tail planes. They are a little slugish when pulling back and pushing down.

Stingray333
09-24-2008, 11:45 AM
I think you have to build up some speed and altitude to cool the engines a bit before really opening them up as well,

Stingray

JSG72
09-24-2008, 02:28 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Butterfly tail. Was only devised to save on materials. Not as a performance enhancer. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Nae Luck! p51srule

Bremspropeller
09-24-2008, 03:53 PM
V-tails have less drag and therefore higher performance.

The downside is, your a/c might become a little biatchy.

Take the Bonnie for example.

JSG72
09-24-2008, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by Bremspropeller:
V-tails have less drag and therefore higher performance.

The downside is, your a/c might become a little biatchy.

Take the Bonnie for example.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif Get real!

If that were the case..... Bonanza! But it ain't. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Taylortony
09-24-2008, 04:57 PM
Originally posted by JSG72

If that were the case..... Bonanza! But it ain't. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

V tail Bonanza is a dog, open the window and the tail falls off.....

Bremspropeller
09-24-2008, 04:58 PM
Your scoreboard: http://www.dooya.schildersmilies.de/fred_ww.gif


The three most dangerous things in aviation:
Two captains in a DC-9,
A doctor in a split-tail Bonanza,
And a stewardess with a chipped tooth.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

p51srule
09-25-2008, 09:49 AM
LoL http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

theres a V-tail Bonaza at our local airport it looks like it would crash if it got into some turbulence.

P51srule

Xiolablu3
09-27-2008, 08:47 AM
I cannot see how the elevator or rudder works properly in a V-tail.

Are the elevators incorporated in to the ailerons somehow, like in the GO229?

stalkervision
09-27-2008, 08:51 AM
V-tails have built in dihedral and are more stable therefore. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

JSG72
09-27-2008, 10:42 AM
Originally posted by stalkervision:
V-tails have built in dihedral and are more stable therefore. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

Aaagh!

AFAIK. Butterfly tails are inherently unstable.
The use of "Fly by Wire" being extant on any modern "V" tail design. Specifically on swept wing designs. The F117. (Wobbly Goblin) being a case in point
I will have to look up, how the Straight winged Fouga Magister managed.

Bremspropeller
09-27-2008, 10:45 AM
They're just as stable in flight, it's just a bit different when you start moving the stick and rudders.

stalkervision
09-27-2008, 11:08 AM
http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/GENERAL_AVIATION/bonanza/GA10G2.jpg

"In theory, the Bonanza's V-tail design uses only two surfaces to perform its function as compared to the three surfaces of a conventional straight-tail design. This reduction in surfaces reduces both drag and weight, while also lowering the probability of tail buffeting from the wakes generated by the aircraft's wing and canopy. Aircraft control response with the V-tail is equivalent to that of a conventional tail of 40 percent greater surface area. Manufacturing costs for the V-tail design are also lower because fewer parts are required to fabricate only two surfaces instead of three."

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

JSG72
09-27-2008, 11:37 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Judging by your pic. Was it captioned "Afraid to fly?"

M_Gunz
09-27-2008, 11:46 AM
I've heard of pilots being surprised at how fast the V-tails accelerate, esp in dives.
They don't all survive the experience. One came down in Delaware on approach but exceeded
VNE before he thought to slow down. Nice angle but it didn't stop till the crash.

PanzerAce
09-27-2008, 12:46 PM
Originally posted by JSG72:
AFAIK. Butterfly tails are inherently unstable.
The use of "Fly by Wire" being extant on any modern "V" tail design. Specifically on swept wing designs. The F117. (Wobbly Goblin) being a case in point
I will have to look up, how the Straight winged Fouga Magister managed.

Actually, talking about combat planes these days is kinda stupid from the stability standpoint, since they are all designed to be unstable, and they all need FbW setups these days.

Bremspropeller
09-27-2008, 12:53 PM
Yeah, but the 117 was not designed to be aerodynamicly instable.
It was designed to get the ugliest shape out of a box of aluminium.

Look at all those edges and oddly-shaped panels.
No wonder it needs "magic" to stay in the air.

And that's where it's biatchy behavior during refuelling came from - not the V-tail.

buzzsaw1939
09-27-2008, 01:08 PM
Come on you guys... the 35 was a good old bird, she was the Cadillac of her day, ..thats why all those dead doctors liked em!.. errr, I mean...that wasn't the planes fault, you have to practice to fly anything! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

stalkervision
09-27-2008, 01:09 PM
Originally posted by buzzsaw1939:
Come on you guys... the 35 was a good old bird, she was the Cadillac of her day, ..thats why all those dead doctors liked em!.. errr, I mean...that wasn't the planes fault, you have to practice to fly anything! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Kettenhunde
09-27-2008, 04:23 PM
that wasn't the planes fault, you have to practice to fly anything!

Exactly, the term "doctor killer" refers to fact they can afford much more airplane than their skills are ready to take on.

Today it is the Cirrus SR22 killing off our Doctors and Lawyers.


Back in the day, the Beechcraft Bonanza was known as the "doctor Killer". The Bonanza was a perfectly good airplane, in fact, that was it's problem. Because of it's relative luxury and speed it was the airplane of choice for doctors, lawyers and others with plenty of money, but not enough time to really immerse themselves in the GA culture.

http://www.dailyaviator.com/?p=225

All the Best,

Crumpp