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CaptainBeefhead
10-26-2005, 06:36 AM
extending airbrakes in ver. 3.04. Is this a bug?But for instance the SBD works fine.
I have not tried earlier versions of the game.

CaptainBeefhead
10-26-2005, 06:36 AM
extending airbrakes in ver. 3.04. Is this a bug?But for instance the SBD works fine.
I have not tried earlier versions of the game.

Capt.LoneRanger
10-26-2005, 06:39 AM
It's not a bug - that is how it works. The gear is reinforced and has "flaps" attached to it. By swinging forward it acts like an airbrake.

CaptainBeefhead
10-26-2005, 06:43 AM
But they does lock or breake if the speed is high enough doesn´t they. When do I use them, for what purpose?

PBNA-Boosher
10-26-2005, 06:45 AM
AND! if you're in deep trouble and your gear mechanism doesn't work because your hydraulics were shot out, a game bug may possibly lower your mains for you.

Kuna15
10-26-2005, 07:00 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by CaptainBeefhead:
But they does lock or breake if the speed is high enough doesn´t they. When do I use them, for what purpose? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I use them only for landing. They shouldn't be used in combat because of the reason you mentioned, when deployed gears are automatically lowered and that isn't wise if we are in the middle of combat.

XyZspineZyX
10-26-2005, 07:46 AM
They used for dive bombing. I've seen footage of F4U-1C's lowering their gear before going into a dive bomb run.

Zyzbot
10-26-2005, 08:27 AM
Pilot comment about using wheels as air brakes:

€œMy initial task with the Corsair was, as previously mentioned, to check out the diving characteristics. We had had reports of Marine Corps Corsairs losing the fabric from their elevators, and I could well imagine this because, due to the combination of relative aerodynamic cleanliness, high power and weight, the Corsair accelerated very rapidly in a dive with the aircraft clean, and relatively inexperienced pilots working off some exuberance by diving steeply from high altitudes without close regard to structural limitations could easily have found themselves in trouble. In clean condition, acceleration was rapid to 400 knots (740 km/h) below 10,000 ft (3 050 in), but with the undercarriage extended to serve as a dive brake it took about the same height loss to reach 350 knots (650 km/h). Any attempt to exceed these limiting speeds produced pronounced elevator buffeting.

Lowering the undercarriage as a brake was done by using the dive brake control, the tail wheel remaining retracted otherwise damage to the tail wheel doors would have resulted. Lowering the main wheels produced a strong nose down trim change, and the elevators heavied up in diving and a pullout called for plenty of height in consequence. Buffeting of the elevators could occur during the recovery, dictating easing off the pullout and reducing. Prior to the dive, the supercharger was set to NEUTRAL, the mixture in AUTO RICH, the throttle was set one-third open, the cowling flaps, oil and intercooler shutters were shut and the rudder was trimmed six deg left with the elevator set one-and-a-half deg nose down. As no automatic boost control was fitted, care had to be exercised in avoiding over boosting.€

Platypus_1.JaVA
10-26-2005, 08:42 AM
LOL, It is not a bug, It is a feature. I haven't heard that in a long time http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif