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View Full Version : What to do with a downed and injured flier



ThreeCrow
12-30-2004, 06:22 PM
He could have been downed by a Mitsubishi or something powered by BMW, Mercedes Benz or even Rolls Royce..... or a Ford.

As soon as I turned toward the tobacco shop on Broadway and drove past the cemetary in a driving rainstorm at sunset..... there he (she?) was. In the center of the left lane, wing flapping, coal black crow.

I carefully straddled him, wheels on either side, and pulled over (decision took almost a second). I ran back with a towel and saw the on-coming cars either carefully do what I had done or swerve to another lane to miss him. He was no longer moving when I got to him but I picked him up anyway and took him to the warmth of the car..... he was totally drenched.

I made him a nest on the seat and continued my personal mission of pipe tobacco, used book store (a wealth of WW2 books at one/fourth the usual price) and the grocer.

By the time I left the tobaccanist he had revived and had shrugged off the towel. By the time I got home he was, not perky, but aware. I told my wife that I had a birthday present for her, a non material but (badly needed in a world of death) uplifting gift of life. We have rescued birds before and loved the experience. Our backyard is a refuge into which we pile peanuts, pecans, sunflower seeds and wild bird seed. We have a wicker love seat set by the back windows and bird books and binoculars. It is a great place to sit and try to put it all together.

We have a special love for Corvids (was once my sn here and elsewhere) and, along with Blue Jays and Magpies, these be crows. Recent research on New Caledonia by an Australian (or possibly New Zealand, sorry if wrong) group suggest that crows are better at making tools and passing on the technique than are chimpanzees.

He has taken over our bathroom (we have five cats) and my wife tells me that he told her that his name was "Hank". After much research and talking with many bird re-heb folks we figured that his wing/ribs were bruised but not broken. We worry, in our location, Sacramento California, about west nile virus..... but (cross fingers) he appears ok. He is eating and he appears to be young and in good health (perfect pilot).

Our problem ...identical to those who found, say, an RAF pilot in France... is that while it is totally legal to shoot him, we cannot prolong his life as a (now perhaps) non flier.

We could be arrested for harboring him.

I had to though. He knows more about the joy of flight than I ever will but was driven down with heavily water-logged wings and clipped by something.

Dang..... must Il2 pervade ALL of my life?

Cheers

ThreeCrow
12-30-2004, 06:22 PM
He could have been downed by a Mitsubishi or something powered by BMW, Mercedes Benz or even Rolls Royce..... or a Ford.

As soon as I turned toward the tobacco shop on Broadway and drove past the cemetary in a driving rainstorm at sunset..... there he (she?) was. In the center of the left lane, wing flapping, coal black crow.

I carefully straddled him, wheels on either side, and pulled over (decision took almost a second). I ran back with a towel and saw the on-coming cars either carefully do what I had done or swerve to another lane to miss him. He was no longer moving when I got to him but I picked him up anyway and took him to the warmth of the car..... he was totally drenched.

I made him a nest on the seat and continued my personal mission of pipe tobacco, used book store (a wealth of WW2 books at one/fourth the usual price) and the grocer.

By the time I left the tobaccanist he had revived and had shrugged off the towel. By the time I got home he was, not perky, but aware. I told my wife that I had a birthday present for her, a non material but (badly needed in a world of death) uplifting gift of life. We have rescued birds before and loved the experience. Our backyard is a refuge into which we pile peanuts, pecans, sunflower seeds and wild bird seed. We have a wicker love seat set by the back windows and bird books and binoculars. It is a great place to sit and try to put it all together.

We have a special love for Corvids (was once my sn here and elsewhere) and, along with Blue Jays and Magpies, these be crows. Recent research on New Caledonia by an Australian (or possibly New Zealand, sorry if wrong) group suggest that crows are better at making tools and passing on the technique than are chimpanzees.

He has taken over our bathroom (we have five cats) and my wife tells me that he told her that his name was "Hank". After much research and talking with many bird re-heb folks we figured that his wing/ribs were bruised but not broken. We worry, in our location, Sacramento California, about west nile virus..... but (cross fingers) he appears ok. He is eating and he appears to be young and in good health (perfect pilot).

Our problem ...identical to those who found, say, an RAF pilot in France... is that while it is totally legal to shoot him, we cannot prolong his life as a (now perhaps) non flier.

We could be arrested for harboring him.

I had to though. He knows more about the joy of flight than I ever will but was driven down with heavily water-logged wings and clipped by something.

Dang..... must Il2 pervade ALL of my life?

Cheers

tsisqua
12-30-2004, 06:33 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Our problem ...identical to those who found, say, an RAF pilot in France... is that while it is totally legal to shoot him, we cannot prolong his life as a (now perhaps) non flier.

We could be arrested for harboring him.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

May God bless you for your kindness. When the law of love is at work, the laws of man are useless.

Tsisqua

p1ngu666
12-30-2004, 06:37 PM
aw thats tough http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

i hope something happens good for the bird and u guys http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif.

perhaps show bird a picture of douglas bader, and tell bird about him http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Dammerung
12-30-2004, 06:53 PM
Good to know that SOME people still do the right thing in this world...

Jagdgeschwader2
12-30-2004, 10:01 PM
I had a similar experience this year.
I live in Texas where severe weather
is guaranteed every year. During one
storm we had 80 mph winds and heavy
rains. After the storm I went outside
to see if the garage was still there.
Next to the garage was a large brown
bird. He only looked up at me when I
walked up on him and made no attempt
to fly. I picked him up and took him
inside. I placed him in a laundry
basket and covered him up with a towel.
After about twenty minutes he was ready
to go and was chirping. I took him
outside and he shot off like a rocket.
I was left with a good feeling after
he flew away. I hope he is ok where ever
he is. There should be an organization
in your city that can provide care for
that bird. I found two that specialized
in the care of injured birds in Texas.
I hope everything turns out well and
I'm glad that you stopped to help.

http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/jagdgeschwader2s.jpg

Daiichidoku
12-31-2004, 12:08 AM
Often in China, locals would stay well away from downed pilots, JP or Ami

Many believed that if the pilot was destined to die, so be it, they would not interfere in the "big plan"...to save a pilots life was to mean ensuring that one would always have to care for the pilot for the rest of thier lives, that they would be responsible for the pilot ever after

wayno7777
12-31-2004, 12:45 AM
One morning my wife called me outside and this is what I saw.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/Owl9-22-03d.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/Owl9-22-03b.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/Owl9-22-03h.jpg



I couldn't believe it. I knew there were owls in the area, but you almost never see them. Something was wrong with this one so I called around and a local agency told me to bring it in. Well, that was in September of 2003. One evening last month I saw one fly to a tree, so maybe they released it back in my area. You are right though, it does give you a good feeling to help out even a little bit.

GAU-8
12-31-2004, 01:16 AM
im glad you guys have nice things like this that pop-up everyonce in a while. just in time. my dog of 16, yeah, 16 years, im having to put down today, in about 8 hours. more than a family member, more than a best friend...

i have been one of those people that gets blessed by finding injured/needy animals at the right time in thier worst moments, its beautiful to watch them grow, and accept us as thier family rather than it a part of ours.

beautiful owl btw.

pourshot
12-31-2004, 01:36 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by GAU-8:
im glad you guys have nice things like this that pop-up everyonce in a while. just in time. my dog of 16, yeah, 16 years, im having to put down today, in about 8 hours. more than a family member, more than a best friend...
. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'am sorry to hear that mate as a dog lover myself I understand exactly how you feel, Pets and particuly dogs become close family members and the death of such a friend cuts deep.

My own dog is a 12 year old diabetic and as a result of this has gone blind and almost deaf, but she is happy for now so I can enjoy her company for a little longer at least. But I know the time will come when I have to make the same choice and end it for her. I feel sad just thinking about having to do such a thing.

WTE_Ibis
12-31-2004, 02:55 AM
Yes it is most sad,I had to have put down a little
cross breed after 18 years,a long time.I held her in my arms while the vet admininistered the shot.
Very,very sad day. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

SkyPiggies
12-31-2004, 11:55 AM
You folks are lucky there are no cats loose in your areas

Half my neighbors own them and they all get thrown into the street at night to wail, fight and slaughter our feathered friends

Sick and injured birds just don't survive till morning around here

Hrdina
12-31-2004, 07:46 PM
Thanks. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

Are there any wildlife rehab centers in your area? You could always call them and ask if they could take in an injured crow if, hypothetically, someone found one. We have one nearby to which we have taken an injured bird.

Daiichidoku
01-01-2005, 01:10 AM
In a suburb of Toronto, the city I live in, there was a hubbub about COYOTES roaming the streets at night (no lie)...the ppl were freaking cuz they woke in the morniungs to find some neighbourhood cats half eaten by them

Of course, nothing could be done, because coyotes are a protected species, besides, they were in the area long before any silly humans...

Nobody seemed to have a problem with the cats doing what is natural, that is, catching and killing vermin like mice et al....I was glad to know the coyotes were allowed do also do what is natural to them..catching and killing prey, even it that includes local cats!

Only species that should be checked for killing should be US!

SkyPiggies
01-01-2005, 07:34 AM
Ha, seeing coyotes deal with the local cat population would be fun... our animal rights fundies wouldn't put up with it though, no matter how "natural"

Re. crows - I once cut across some deserted parkland at night after a evening with friends. Big crow population roosts in the trees there at night

Half way across I accidentally trod on a fallen branch, snapping it with a loud *crack* (I was hopelessly drunk)

Above me I heard a single, solitary *CRAWWW*... then another, and another - within seconds hundreds of them had joined the chorus, and were making horrific racket

They then began to dive-bomb me (this in near-complete darkness)

Got pecked on the head a couple of times - and dozens of them dragged their claws through my hair

Needless to say - dark as it was - I got out of there pretty ****ed quick http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif