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dlian
11-10-2004, 06:00 PM
I recall much discussion about gunfire being heard in the cockpit led to fixes to reduce or remove it in FB. In his autobiography "Samurai!" one of Japan's leading aces (64 confirmed kills), Saburo Sakai, made a few references to the sound of gunfire in the cockpit. His comments seem to suggest that cannon fire was audible. Anyway, read them and judge for yourself. By the way, the Zeros lacked radios because of the desire to keep the planes light.

Chapter 14: "I was less than 800 yards away when the P-39 hauled up in a screaming climb to hit Sasai from below. In desperation I jammed down on the cannon trigger, hoping the report would warn Sasai or possibly alarm the enemy pilot into breaking off his attack. The P-39 did not waver, but Sasai finally heard the cannon reports. Immediately, with his wingmen hugging his own plane, he pulled up in a loop, swinging wide in a bid for height."

Chapter 21: "The first P-39 moved into firing position against the last Zero when I hit him in a shallow dive. The enemy pilot never knew what happened; bullets and cannon shells smashed into his fuselage at the wing roots and the plane disintegrated, one wing flipping wildly through the air. My gun reports carried to the other Zeros, and at once two fighters clawed around in a tight spiral and fell upon the other two P-39s. It was over in seconds."

There are another two similar references in the book but I cannot find them right now, as I type this post!

dlian
11-10-2004, 06:00 PM
I recall much discussion about gunfire being heard in the cockpit led to fixes to reduce or remove it in FB. In his autobiography "Samurai!" one of Japan's leading aces (64 confirmed kills), Saburo Sakai, made a few references to the sound of gunfire in the cockpit. His comments seem to suggest that cannon fire was audible. Anyway, read them and judge for yourself. By the way, the Zeros lacked radios because of the desire to keep the planes light.

Chapter 14: "I was less than 800 yards away when the P-39 hauled up in a screaming climb to hit Sasai from below. In desperation I jammed down on the cannon trigger, hoping the report would warn Sasai or possibly alarm the enemy pilot into breaking off his attack. The P-39 did not waver, but Sasai finally heard the cannon reports. Immediately, with his wingmen hugging his own plane, he pulled up in a loop, swinging wide in a bid for height."

Chapter 21: "The first P-39 moved into firing position against the last Zero when I hit him in a shallow dive. The enemy pilot never knew what happened; bullets and cannon shells smashed into his fuselage at the wing roots and the plane disintegrated, one wing flipping wildly through the air. My gun reports carried to the other Zeros, and at once two fighters clawed around in a tight spiral and fell upon the other two P-39s. It was over in seconds."

There are another two similar references in the book but I cannot find them right now, as I type this post!

Philipscdrw
11-10-2004, 06:05 PM
Hey! A constructive post!

That's interesting. Nice to know that Oleg & co were right all along!

Hopefully BoB will have a more subtle approach though.

Nige_Reconman
11-10-2004, 06:08 PM
There are quite a few references made to hearing he report of gunfire - particularly in that book. Other books though seem to make it sound like it was indistinguishable - maybe it's dependant on the airframe/engine and how much noise it generates as standard.

*realises how obvious that conclusion is*

brasil66
11-10-2004, 07:00 PM
NOTE: Radios werent removed from Japanese planes ONLY to save weight.

They worked poorly if at all. Had the radio sets had higher reliability, the weight would have been offset by the tactical benefits they offered and the Japanese would have used them more often.

Furthermore, they werent ALWAYS removed. It depended upon the plane and the pilot.

Just FYI

Athosd
11-10-2004, 07:13 PM
The change to the IL2 sound engine was made because previously you not only heard the gunfire, but the whine of an approaching engine as well.
This meant that Boom and Zoom tactics were unrealistically ineffective in multiplay - as the target would always be warned of the attackers approach.
Sound would also give away a stealthy attacker coming in from a blind spot.

I believe the change was made for the better in this sim.
In those extracts Saburo Sakai only refers to cannon fire being audible - and in one case it took an extended burst of fire to get his comrade's attention (the same pilot was unaware of the approaching P39).

Oleg pointed out many moons ago that IL2 has only the one sound engine for interior and exterior environments - so some compromise was needed to implement the change.

Salute

Athos