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View Full Version : For those future PF Jet Jocks amongst you WIP Big PICS



Taylortony
10-21-2004, 04:19 PM
I have wracked my brain, all one cell of it to figure out how i can help you 262 pilots join in and enjoy PF and i have come up with a solution... Meet the KIKKA, if you approve i will finish and post it for you all http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

The Nakajima Kikka was the only World War II Japanese jet aircraft capable of taking off under its own power (the jet-boosted Kugisho Okha 22 had to be carried aloft beneath a Mitsubishi G4M BETTY mother ship. See the NASM collection for examples of both of these aircraft) When Germany began test flying the superb jet-propelled, Messerschmitt Me 262 fighter, the Japanese air attaché to Germany witnessed a number of flight trials. Thanks to the attaché's enthusiastic reports, the Naval Staff directed Nakajima in September 1944 to develop a twin-jet, single-seat, attack aircraft based on the Me 262 design. The specifications were somewhat less rigorous than those for the German fighter: range 205 km (127 mi) with a bomb load of 500 kg (1,102 lb) or 278 km (173 mi) with a load of 250 kg (551 lb); maximum speed of only 696 kph (432 mph); landing speed of 148 kph (92 mph); and a takeoff run of 350 m (1,150 ft) with rocket- assist. These figures match the capabilities of the best piston engine fighters of the war but they fall far short of what the Germans achieved with the Messerschmitt design.

Nakajima assigned the project to Kazuo Ohno and Kenichi Matsumura. Their design roughly resembled the Me 262 but was smaller. It was an all-metal aircraft except for the control surfaces, which were fabric-covered. Ohno and Matsumura mounted the engines in pods slung beneath each wing, like the German jet. This feature allowed the designers to test different types of engines without having to disturb the fuselage structure. With Japanese industry beset by numerous logistical and technical problems, engine design lagged airframe development and several other types of engines were considered. Fortunately, an engineer found photographs and a cross-section drawing of the German BMW 003 axial-flow turbojet, the engine that powered the Heinkel He 162 Volksj√¬§ger (also in Museum's collection). After several failed attempts to perfect other designs, the Japanese developed a workable engine similar to the BMW power plant designated the Ne-20. During this phase of the design, the naval authorities had designated the aircraft Navy Special Attacker Kikka, a suicide aircraft.The first prototype was ready by August 1945. Lieutenant Commander Susumu Takaoka made the first flight on August 7. He made a second attempt four days later but aborted the takeoff and crashed into Tokyo Bay, tearing off the landing gear. Technicians had mounted the two takeoff-assist rockets at the wrong angle. Development of the Kikka ended four days with the Japanese surrender. Another prototype was almost ready for flight and about 25 other Kikkas sat in the Nakajima factory in various stages of assembly. The National Air and Space Museum's Kikka and an assortment of extra components are all that survive of this ambitious program.
from http://www.nasm.si.edu/research/aero/aircraft/nakakikka.htm

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/airplane/museum/nakajima/KIKKA/Kikka2.jpg


http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/il2_skinners_guides/Pacific/kikka_1.jpg

http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/il2_skinners_guides/Pacific/kikka_2.jpg

Taylortony
10-21-2004, 04:19 PM
I have wracked my brain, all one cell of it to figure out how i can help you 262 pilots join in and enjoy PF and i have come up with a solution... Meet the KIKKA, if you approve i will finish and post it for you all http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

The Nakajima Kikka was the only World War II Japanese jet aircraft capable of taking off under its own power (the jet-boosted Kugisho Okha 22 had to be carried aloft beneath a Mitsubishi G4M BETTY mother ship. See the NASM collection for examples of both of these aircraft) When Germany began test flying the superb jet-propelled, Messerschmitt Me 262 fighter, the Japanese air attaché to Germany witnessed a number of flight trials. Thanks to the attaché's enthusiastic reports, the Naval Staff directed Nakajima in September 1944 to develop a twin-jet, single-seat, attack aircraft based on the Me 262 design. The specifications were somewhat less rigorous than those for the German fighter: range 205 km (127 mi) with a bomb load of 500 kg (1,102 lb) or 278 km (173 mi) with a load of 250 kg (551 lb); maximum speed of only 696 kph (432 mph); landing speed of 148 kph (92 mph); and a takeoff run of 350 m (1,150 ft) with rocket- assist. These figures match the capabilities of the best piston engine fighters of the war but they fall far short of what the Germans achieved with the Messerschmitt design.

Nakajima assigned the project to Kazuo Ohno and Kenichi Matsumura. Their design roughly resembled the Me 262 but was smaller. It was an all-metal aircraft except for the control surfaces, which were fabric-covered. Ohno and Matsumura mounted the engines in pods slung beneath each wing, like the German jet. This feature allowed the designers to test different types of engines without having to disturb the fuselage structure. With Japanese industry beset by numerous logistical and technical problems, engine design lagged airframe development and several other types of engines were considered. Fortunately, an engineer found photographs and a cross-section drawing of the German BMW 003 axial-flow turbojet, the engine that powered the Heinkel He 162 Volksj√¬§ger (also in Museum's collection). After several failed attempts to perfect other designs, the Japanese developed a workable engine similar to the BMW power plant designated the Ne-20. During this phase of the design, the naval authorities had designated the aircraft Navy Special Attacker Kikka, a suicide aircraft.The first prototype was ready by August 1945. Lieutenant Commander Susumu Takaoka made the first flight on August 7. He made a second attempt four days later but aborted the takeoff and crashed into Tokyo Bay, tearing off the landing gear. Technicians had mounted the two takeoff-assist rockets at the wrong angle. Development of the Kikka ended four days with the Japanese surrender. Another prototype was almost ready for flight and about 25 other Kikkas sat in the Nakajima factory in various stages of assembly. The National Air and Space Museum's Kikka and an assortment of extra components are all that survive of this ambitious program.
from http://www.nasm.si.edu/research/aero/aircraft/nakakikka.htm

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/airplane/museum/nakajima/KIKKA/Kikka2.jpg


http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/il2_skinners_guides/Pacific/kikka_1.jpg

http://mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/il2_skinners_guides/Pacific/kikka_2.jpg

SeaFireLIV
10-21-2004, 04:56 PM
And I thought I`d seen every WWII aircraft surprise by now.... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif Lovely skin (although I don`t fly jets).

Taylortony
10-21-2004, 05:00 PM
ohhh we aim to please http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

WTE_Dukayn
10-21-2004, 07:34 PM
Looks remarkably similar to the Me262, probly cos it was based off it's design huh :P

darkhorizon11
10-21-2004, 08:10 PM
Actually the Japanese showed interest in the Me 262 itself also. They purchased the planes from the Germans and planned to produce their own Schwalbes.

Bearcat99
10-21-2004, 08:39 PM
From what I remember reading they actually improved on the design... they had a version of the Komet too. Great work.