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View Full Version : O.T. Can you save someones life?



whiteladder
04-21-2007, 12:35 PM
This is my second off topic post this week but I hope you will indulge me. Hopefully someone might read this and feel they could make a difference to someones life.

10 years ago someone I went to school with, Timothy Limbert, contracted leukaemia and sadly died. It was quite a shock at the time he was the first person of my own age I knew that had died and brought home my own mortality. I felt that I need to do something and I registered with the Anthony Nolan Trust. This is a charity that matches people who are prepared to donate bone marrow to people with a range of life threatening blood disorders.

Over the past 10 years I haven`t really thought about being on the register until about 6 weeks ago a package dropped through my letter box with 3 test tubes and a Letter saying I was a potential match for someone who needed an urgent bone marrow transplant. I had to go to my local hospital and have some further blood test to check my suitability, there was still only a 25% chance I would be a good match.

It turn out I was a 95% good match and last Thursday I went to London for an operation and had about 1 litre (about 2 pints) of bone marrow removed from my pelvis which was then sent to the person needing the transplant.

I`m back home writing this now and although I`m quite sore and tired it really is a small price to pay for the chance of saving someone`s life.

The Anthony Nolan trust really needs new donors and in particular needs young male donors, if its something you feel you could do please go to the following web site and have a look or please feel free to P.M me.

http://www.anthonynolan.org.uk/

Thanks for your time.

horseback
04-21-2007, 12:53 PM
A bump, and a note that there are several organizations in other countries that do the same or similar things. Contact your local Red Cross or equivalent.

One of my brothers has a rare blood type and is asked to donate quite regularly. We all try to donate when we can, and are on a couple of registries for bone marrow and the like, because of our odd collection of ancestors.

Sometimes it's a minor annoyance, but our parents instilled a sense of duty to help others, so the alternative guilt is a major annoyance...

cheers

horseback

Taylortony
04-21-2007, 12:55 PM
Stunning............... I realise this is supposed to be a really painful experience for the donor..........

I as no doubt the person recieving a life by your unselfish actions take my hat off to you...

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

I checked the site but fall out of the age group otherwise I would have registered too........

ytareh
04-21-2007, 01:16 PM
Man people who do this deserve so much respect .Im pathologically afraid of needles and the idea of even donating blood terrifys me.I had a quick look at the website .How exactly do they get out the bone marrow?(The mind boggles).I guess theres just as much good as bad in the world for people to do this sort of thing.

PBNA-Boosher
04-21-2007, 01:31 PM
Whiteladder, yours is an honorable sacrifice and you should be very proud. I donate blood whenever I can, but as of yet haven't registered for much else, though I am registered for organ donation should my life be ended in a car crash or something of the like.

One of my close relatives is on Gammaglobulin IV's every month. Those aren't exactly easy to get, it takes almost fifty bags of blood to make one dose of Gammaglobluin, or some crazy number like that.

tigertalon
04-21-2007, 01:39 PM
Respect whiteladder.

I'm donoring blood 4 times per year (max rate here is once per 3 months for males and 4 months for females) for some 10 years now and am registered as a bone marrow donor. The least I can do.

whiteladder
04-21-2007, 04:05 PM
How exactly do they get out the bone marrow?(The mind boggles).


It was all pretty simple really, there are 2 methods. I choose to have a general anesthetic and then the bone marrow was removed from my pelvis with a large needle. I have 2 tiny puncture wounds on my back and some bruising but thats about it. It was fairly painful on Friday after the operation, but not too bad today. The main side effect is tiredness, so I`ve spent most of today sleeping.

It is a incredible feeling knowing you can help someone like this, this transplant was their last chance and a couple of days out of my life for the rest theirs seems like a pretty good swop.

K_Freddie
04-21-2007, 04:25 PM
Honourable, but I hope you went for a bone marrow/osteoporosis checkup before you did this. You might find yourself in the 'same boat'.

Agreed, I'd lay down my life for my wife and kids... beyond that I step back a bit and start checking up first.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Lodovik
04-21-2007, 04:29 PM
Well, I've been thinking about this since I took a first aid course last year, and seems your post was all I needed to convince me to sign as a donor. I'll be making the call the very next week.
Thanks for spreading the good word on this http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

M_Gunz
04-21-2007, 04:35 PM
Got Organ Donor on my ID as always. When they get to a body with Organ Donor they do an on the
spot salvage operation which includes femur bones for the marrow. They replace the bones in
the corpse with PVC tubes, btw. Hey, it's not like I'll be needing them!

A couple of weeks ago on Google News Medical section there was a report about a new enzyme(?)
that will change A, B and A-B blood into Type O which is AFAIK universal. FDA has to get in
on it so figure 5 to 10 years unless it gets political then figure maybe never.

Bearcat99
04-21-2007, 05:40 PM
A little pain and tiredness to save a life? You bet. I'd go through a lot of pain to save a life if I had to....

DKoor
04-21-2007, 06:01 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Achilles_NZ
04-22-2007, 02:18 AM
Damn good post... inspired me to get off my arse and register as well. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif
For Kiwi's... you can reg @ http://www.nzblood.co.nz/?t=69

F19_Ob
04-22-2007, 03:10 AM
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">You sir whiteladder are cool.....not many of your sort around.</span> http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

--------------------------------

I'm a cretin for most part but once I was pretty sharp and used to play with thoughts and, for example, contemplate the idea that if every human with more than 20 million bucks would donate half of what they owned, for lifesaving projects or purposes, they'd still be able to live a long life in luxury, like goblins.
Goblins however seem very unwilling to depart even from the smallest of goldnuggets.
Hence the majority of the population of non-goblins might spend the 'majority' of their 'few, days in poverty, wich is uncool.
This small excercise in observation led me to suspect that goblins are indeed 'Not' cool beings.

Ofcourse a group of more resourceful individuals had already thought of the idea before me and had it calculated that the cash it would generate would save the world from poverty. It was presented in media and for politicians some 15 years ago.
Seems like the idea was rejected though.

Maybe it was the addition of 'free will' that put the last nail in the coffin.
-----------------

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Anyway, you are the man.
From this day your new name really should be 'The Bonemarrow Man' I think.
Wear it proudly </span> http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

ploughman
04-22-2007, 04:31 AM
I've been with the trust for 6 years but haven't yet been asked to go any further than having some blood tests to see if I was a good enough match for a specific recipient.

It's a nice selfless and anonymous way to help others who really need it.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

WWSensei
04-22-2007, 06:27 AM
Been a registered blood marrow donor for 22 years.

T_O_A_D
04-22-2007, 07:38 AM
WOW and I was expecting to talk about CPR training.
I doubt I can sign up for that, I used to give blood but was removed from the donors list once, due to taking perscribed steriods in my back after a car accident. It did something to the blood work and they tossed me out. I've had them retest my blood since, and al is fine, but I guess once your on the list your marked for life.

Yes I'm certified for CPR much and recertified ever since the 70's

Just got my latest Recert about 3 weeks ago.
It sure has been revamped several times since my first class, years ago.

Aaron_GT
04-22-2007, 08:30 AM
I carry a donor card. As far as I am concerned when I am gone if there is anything of use then it is up for grabs. There is less and less that hasn't already worn out as the years go by, of course!

I hope I'd have the courage to give bone marrow, so thanks to WhiteLadder for letting us know about this - it sounds like these days it isn't quite as bad as it used to be.

What is the alternative to a general, though? My lungs are not the best, so I'd want to avoid being knocked out totally if I could.

whiteladder
04-22-2007, 09:13 AM
What is the alternative to a general, though? My lungs are not the best, so I'd want to avoid being knocked out totally if I could.

There is an alternative, you can have the stem cells they need filtered from your core blood. This takes about 8 hours to complete, but you do need to have a series of injections of growth hormone for a week prior to the collection to stimulate products of the extra cells necessary.

I will be having this proceedure done in about a months time (minus the growth hormone) to provide some lympth cells (white blood cells essentially) for the person needing the transplant. This will then be used if they have a relapse to fight the leukaemia cells.

-HH- Beebop
04-22-2007, 09:44 AM
SALUTE! and Respect whiteladder.

Aaron_GT
04-22-2007, 04:04 PM
So how do you get hooked up with a needy recipient? Do they find you, or do you register your tissue types with a database somewhere?

whiteladder
04-22-2007, 04:41 PM
This is how it works with most of the organisations to do this type of matching (certainly the Anthony Nolan trust).

When you register to become a donor a small blood sample is taken, this is tissue typed and the results are stored on the A.N database.

The person needing a donation will first have tried to be matched with a blood relative, if a match isn`t found then the various databases around the world will be searched for a potential match. The person I have donate to could be anywhere in the world not just the U.K.

When a potential match is found a further sample is taken from the donor and the reciepient. These are then mixed together and studied to check for rejection between the 2 samples. If the match is close enough the transplant then goes ahead.

About 5 days before I had my operation on Thursday the recipient would have started a process to destroy their own defective bone marrow in prepartion for the transplantation. At this point they are totally reliant on the donated bone marrow and will quickly deteriate and die if the transplant doesn`t take place.

Current the Anthony Nolan trust has about 360,000 people on its database and organises about 360 transplants each year.

fredk1980
04-22-2007, 05:29 PM
My sincere thanks go out to folks like Whiteladder. My mother is currently suffering from breast cancer that spread to her bones - assuming everything goes well with the chemo, she'll be needing a marrow donor at some point and for whatever reason children are not compatible with their parents. My uncle has only a 25% chance of being a match so I'm very grateful to the aprx. 2m people here in the States who have put themselves into the potential donor pool.

I of course, have done so as well and hope that someday I'll be able to return the life-saving 'favour' that I hope someone will be able to provide my mother.

Worf101
04-22-2007, 08:35 PM
No greater love man. No greater love. I salute you and thank you...

Da Worfster

Esel1964
04-23-2007, 12:15 AM
God Bless and best wishes to the ill and their families.

My 'life-saving' event was in an emergency situation,the victim was on our boat and was hot so they jumped into the lake(I was pulling alongside the floating 'parking lot' at the marina convenience store.I got the boat tied off and noticed someone's missing.
I look in the water all around the boat,and see nothing-except a spot where bubbles were coming up(thank God this was 20 yr. ago when I was skin/scuba diving/swimming regularly)),anyway I dove down that bubble spot and grabbed my father at about 8 ft. down,unconscious and sinking,and wrestled him onto the boat.

Thanks to the CAP I remembered the basics of first aid/CPR,laid him on his side,worked his lungs and brought him around.All turned out OK.


As far as donating parts while still alive,yeah-why not-if I'm not using it.

KIMURA
04-23-2007, 01:44 AM
Hat off Whiteladder. I got deep respect for you.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

slipBall
04-23-2007, 02:04 AM
Originally posted by whiteladder:
This is my second off topic post this week but I hope you will indulge me. Hopefully someone might read this and feel they could make a difference to someones life.

10 years ago someone I went to school with, Timothy Limbert, contracted leukaemia and sadly died. It was quite a shock at the time he was the first person of my own age I knew that had died and brought home my own mortality. I felt that I need to do something and I registered with the Anthony Nolan Trust. This is a charity that matches people who are prepared to donate bone marrow to people with a range of life threatening blood disorders.

Over the past 10 years I haven`t really thought about being on the register until about 6 weeks ago a package dropped through my letter box with 3 test tubes and a Letter saying I was a potential match for someone who needed an urgent bone marrow transplant. I had to go to my local hospital and have some further blood test to check my suitability, there was still only a 25% chance I would be a good match.

It turn out I was a 95% good match and last Thursday I went to London for an operation and had about 1 litre (about 2 pints) of bone marrow removed from my pelvis which was then sent to the person needing the transplant.

I`m back home writing this now and although I`m quite sore and tired it really is a small price to pay for the chance of saving someone`s life.

The Anthony Nolan trust really needs new donors and in particular needs young male donors, if its something you feel you could do please go to the following web site and have a look or please feel free to P.M me.

http://www.anthonynolan.org.uk/

Thanks for your time.



I donate money once a year to Rush Limbaugh's effort's in this medical research area. He, and his audience, are the largest contribitors year, after year, for this cause. If any of you would like to give, then please check it out.

http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/home/today.guest.html