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RNZAFJay
07-04-2005, 07:04 AM
I remember my Grandad telling me that the Britsh cliped the wings of their Corsiars to get them to fit in thier small hanger bays. He also said this changed their performance slightly.

Is this true or an old guys war story ranting? If it is true, has it been factored into Pacific Fighters?

Just interested to know since you guys know soooo much more about WW2 aviation than me.

JG53Frankyboy
07-04-2005, 07:16 AM
its true, and just check the wings of the two later FAA Corsairs

3.JG51_BigBear
07-04-2005, 08:19 AM
They cut off about eight inches from the wing tips that seems to have resulted in a slight increase in roll.

Tooz_69GIAP
07-04-2005, 09:13 AM
6" were clipped from each wing to help with storage in the smaller hangers in the RN carriers.

This resulted in corsairs being easier to operate from carriers, as the flare was reduced on appraoch, and were easier to touch down on deck.

The RN were actually the first to operate corsairs from carrier decks. The US deemed the corsair too dangerous to fly off deck, and so the Marines flew them from land bases at first.

p1ngu666
07-04-2005, 10:29 AM
better roll, slightly faster at low alt http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

IL2-chuter
07-05-2005, 05:37 AM
Originally posted by Tooz_69GIAP:
6" were clipped from each wing to help with storage in the smaller hangers in the RN carriers.

This resulted in corsairs being easier to operate from carriers, as the flare was reduced on appraoch, and were easier to touch down on deck.

The RN were actually the first to operate corsairs from carrier decks. The US deemed the corsair too dangerous to fly off deck, and so the Marines flew them from land bases at first.

Actually, it seems with the shipborne supply system already up to speed with Hellcat parts and the marines needing something better than Wildcats the decision was a nobrainer. The first of the Navy guys followed the marines rather than give up their aircraft. These guys then began routinely using carriers for refueling, even though they weren't "approved" for carrier work, in mid November, '43.

Gosling616
07-05-2005, 09:35 AM
To assist in DLs the RN also put a small triangular spoiler on the starboard wing near the bottom of the gull part. This was to counter the powerful screw effect from the huge prop stalling the left wing and causing severe wing drop. The spoiler made the starboard wing stall at about the same time as the port giving a neat three point DL. The Gullwing shape was to get the engine higher to allow a larger prop to absorb the excess engine power thus forcing a high nose up on approach and the deck.