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View Full Version : B-26 and a close call with the Akagi.



goshikisen
05-17-2005, 04:44 PM
http://www.ghostwings.com/ValorStudios.com/Images/AShotAcrossTheBow/BigAShotAcrossTheBow.jpg

The picture more or less speaks for itself but if you'd like more info try here:

http://www.ghostwings.com/ValorStudios.com/AShotAcrossTheBow.htm

Regards, Goshikisen.

goshikisen
05-17-2005, 04:44 PM
http://www.ghostwings.com/ValorStudios.com/Images/AShotAcrossTheBow/BigAShotAcrossTheBow.jpg

The picture more or less speaks for itself but if you'd like more info try here:

http://www.ghostwings.com/ValorStudios.com/AShotAcrossTheBow.htm

Regards, Goshikisen.

Waldo.Pepper
05-17-2005, 06:18 PM
Wow that's pretty unbelievable.

jarink
05-17-2005, 08:17 PM
I didn't know the B-26 could carry a torpedo!

Actually, it makes sense in a weird way to fly over the deck like that. Most of the light guns won't be able to bear on you and other ships and fighters may hold fire momentarily for fear of hitting the carrier.

It probably really annoys any admirals on board.

goshikisen
05-17-2005, 08:25 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by jarink:
I didn't know the B-26 could carry a torpedo!
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

And from this write up on Marauders and their use as torpedo carriers... it wasn't a match made in heaven.

"The Marauder could carry an 18-inch 2000-pound torpedo slung on an external rack underneath the fuselage. On the ground, the torpedo only cleared the ground by about four inches when taxiing. In June, the B-26A made its debut as a torpedo bomber, being used against Japanese warships during the Battle of Midway. Four Marauders were equipped with external torpedo racks underneath the keel and took off on June 4, 1942 in an attempt to attack Japanese carriers. The torpedo runs began at 800 feet altitude, the B-26s then dropping down to only ten feet above the water under heavy attack from Japanese fighters. Two of the Marauders were lost in this action, and the other two were heavily damaged. No hits were made on the Japanese carriers. The B-26 was much too large an aircraft for this type of attack."

- also on the topic of Marauders -

Here are some B-26's at Port Moresby. I read about them in Samurai but I'd never seen an actual photo of them. Interesting. Notice also that the airfield and the hills in the background have a resemblance to PF terrain.

http://www.b-26marauderarchive.org/PH/Matthews/PH4847s.jpg

actionhank1786
05-17-2005, 11:30 PM
that is by far one of the best paintings i've seen!
Awesome story too

SaQSoN
05-18-2005, 12:00 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">It probably really annoys any admirals on board. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Actually, Nagumo wasn't really annoyed, but rather impressed. At least according to his own account of this event. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

GoToAway
05-18-2005, 12:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SaQSoN:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">It probably really annoys any admirals on board. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Actually, Nagumo wasn't really annoyed, but rather impressed. At least according to his own account of this event. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Where can I read this account? I've read several full timelines of the Battle of Midway and never ran across any reference to this event. B-17s, yes, but never any 26s.

I'm definitely interested in hearing more about this.

JRJacobs
05-18-2005, 06:11 AM
June 2005 - Aviation History magazine has an interview with the pilot of the "Susie Q". she made it back to midway but with over 500 bullet holes in her, she was unflyable and scrapped and is therfore listed as one of the two that didn't make it even though she got her crew back safely. the navy required the torps to be dropped at less than 150mph and the b-26 stalled above 150 mph so it was a long shot to begin with. the pilot did in fact say he hoped to shake off the pusuit by doing this (there was a method to his madness) but that it didn't work very well [remember the 500 bullet holes] - however flying away at 50 in of hg and over 340mph did keep them in front of anything until the pusuit had to return to the CAP. there's even a 2nd painting of the plane as it passes the island of the carrier.

according to the article it credits this attack as influencing nagumo's decision to switch from bombs to torpedoes to this action with all the subsequent consequences involved.

soon as i read it i started making a mission of it but so far i am still working out the details of making it hard but flyable.

HARD_Sarge
05-18-2005, 06:34 AM
there is a good account of the B-26 attack in a book named "the ragged, rugged warriors" ( I found it when I Was in Hi School over 30 years ago)

got lots of good early and pre war stories in it, about Spain and China and the unknown fight at Midway

one of the interesing ideas, was the top turret was out of ammo, but the gunner would keep going back to his guns and pointhing them at different Zeros as they tried to close in, to bluff the JP Pilots, and for the most part it worked, but the plane was shot to pieces

from what I remember, after the plane had landed and they were debrifed, the pilot and copilot/crew chief went out and started counting the holes, at 300 they gave up, and had over half the plane to go

good story, good book

HARD_Sarge

goshikisen
05-18-2005, 06:59 AM
http://www.b-26mhs.org/images/stories/noseart/P2431.jpg

After the June 4, 1942 Midway Mission, all that was considered salvageable from the "Susie-Q" was the noseart.

Crew from 1st Lt. Muri€s B-26 "Susie-Q" and Capt Collins€ B-26B "Winsockie" Cpl. Frank Melo, Jr., 2nd Lt. Colin Villines, 2nd Lt. Thomas Weems, 2nd Lt. Pren Moore, 2nd Lt. William Moore, Lt. Russell Johnson.

LEXX_Luthor
05-18-2005, 08:31 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">As Earnest [..in TBF..] pulls out, Army Capt. James F. Collins Jr.'s four B-26s of the 69th Bombardment Squadron roar in to attack. The B-26s are making history -€" the first Army squadron to launch a torpedo attack, doing so ahead of their colleagues in the Aleutians later that day. Each plane carries one fish, hanging from its belly. Lt. Jim Muri sees Japanese destroyers ahead and below. He takes a Chesterfield cigarette ("Not a cough in a carload" runs a period advertisement) from a can beneath his feet, and puts it in his mouth. Before he can light his match, Zeros swoop in to attack.

Collins' force heads for Akagi, swinging through flak to the left, then to the right, and finally in at 200 feet. Someone yells "Boy, if mother could see me now!" Muri follows Collins in, through the tracers. Japanese guns rip up the other two B-26s. One falls into the sea. A Japanese machine-gun on Hiryu stitches up an incoming torpedo, and it explodes harmlessly.

Collins releases his fish at 800 yards and pulls out to the right. Muri races in right behind. After Muri comes a Zero, flown by Lt. Iyozo Fujita of Soryu, a Pearl Harbor veteran assigned to combat air patrol. Fujita stitches Muri's B-26 with bullets, smashing the plexiglas turret, ripping open the gas tank. The rear gunner, Pfc. Ashley, tries to shoot back, but one .30-caliber machine gun jams. The other€s motor breaks down, so it won't pull the ammunition tracks. Fujita swoops away.

Muri orders co-pilot Lt. Pete Moore to launch his torpedo at 450 yards, slightly ahead of Akagi. Moore squeezes the trigger, which is connected to a cable and plug with many prongs. "Is it away?" Muri shouts.

"How the hell do I know?" Moore retorts. Muri tries the complex switch himself, but doesn€t feel the torpedo drop. He streaks over the middle of Akagi's deck. Bombardier Lt. Russ Johnson fires the nose gun as the carrier's flight deck team, in white, sprints for cover. As Muri flies down, he feels too close to the enemy to be shot at. But he goggles at Akagi's battle flag, snapping from her mast. <span class="ev_code_yellow">He has seen the blazing Rising Sun flag in newsreels, but never in real life. Now it€s the biggest thing he's ever seen.</span>

Muri pulls his plane out, surrounded by Zeros. The Japanese tear up the B-26, wounding Ashley and side gunner Cpl. Mello. The latter staggers into the cockpit, and says "The plane€s on fire and everybody€s hit back there." Moore rushes back with a fire extinguisher to douse the blaze. Then he gives Ashley sulfa powder, and mans a gun.

Alone in the cockpit, Muri realizes that his plane is in terrible shape, and considers splashing into the drink. Then he decides not to. The Zeroes fly away. Muri flies on. He remembers the unlit Chesterfield in his mouth, and reaches to light it. However, in the battle, he has bitten it in two and swallowed half of it.
:
:
Under part 1 of 4 June (the "first week" http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif, 1942~~&gt; http://www.usswashington.com/dl_index.htm
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Back waiting for the PF releace, I remembered that story, about seeing the battle flag in person, bigger than any cinema news reel back home.

That is 4 HUGE webpages on Midway air and sea operations, never mind the rest of the early World War.

Saunders1953
05-18-2005, 08:49 AM
Just curious, but has anyone here read Walter Lord's or Gordon Prange's books on Midway? I read about the B26's 20-30 years ago, and it would have been in one (or both) of these author's books. I'm at work and can't confirm.

But anyway, Prange's series of books on Pearl and the first 6 months of the war in the Pacific are almost required for those interested in this period and theater. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

JRJacobs
05-22-2005, 02:51 PM
Mission available at http://www.airwarfare.com/Sims/FB/fb_coopmissions.htm#002 and http://forum.combatace.com/index.php?download=1279
(must be registered)

Gog..
05-22-2005, 04:40 PM
Hang on a sec?

He's doing a torpedo run, from broadside on and from 450 yards away he manages to turn this B-26 at right angles and fly down the length of the carrier???

Me thinks he must have flown over the side of the carrier, near the island, or the story has been embellished over the years.

In fact, give it a try with a B-25 yourself and see how hard it would be just to make that turn.

LEXX_Luthor
05-22-2005, 06:55 PM
mmm, lets see... <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Muri orders co-pilot Lt. Pete Moore to launch his torpedo at 450 yards, slightly ahead of Akagi. Moore squeezes the trigger, which is connected to a cable and plug with many prongs. "Is it away?" Muri shouts.

"How the hell do I know?" Moore retorts. Muri tries the complex switch himself, but doesn€t feel the torpedo drop. He streaks over the middle of Akagi's deck. Bombardier Lt. Russ Johnson fires the nose gun as the carrier's flight deck team, in white, sprints for cover. As Muri flies <span class="ev_code_yellow">down</span>, he feels too close to the enemy to be shot at. But he goggles at Akagi's battle flag, snapping from her mast. He has seen the blazing Rising Sun flag in newsreels, but never in real life. Now it€s the biggest thing he's ever seen. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
The Flying "down" is strange in this context. But, it seems he flew across the Akagi, as there is little or no mention of Turning (or Burning, except for the "blazing Rising Sun" flagg).

JRJacobs
05-22-2005, 06:56 PM
http://jrjacobs.mystarband.net/images/MuriFile0011.jpg

as you can see he wasn't approaching at right angles

from his interview
"MURI: Akagi was big, and she was the thing to get. Kaga was a little ways off. We went after the nearest one.... From then on I was concentration on the Akagi.... I thought we were at 45 degrees off the bow at about 800 yards, but the carrier was turning toward us [my note - ships turned into the torpedos it was called combing the wakes]. The angle was changing continuously. At the same time she was turning toward to dodge our torpedo, she was also exposing herself to my flying down her the deck."