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View Full Version : The Sea Still Holds Her Mysteries ...and Surprises



BigA21
05-21-2006, 10:11 AM
Here (http://www.comcast.net/providers/fan/popup.html?v=83516920&pl=83421027.xml&config=/config/common/fan/default.xml)

Art-J
05-21-2006, 10:24 AM
Since the site wants me to register, and I'm not really sure I want to, would You mind giving us more detail on the subject? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

Cheers - Art

BigA21
05-21-2006, 10:36 AM
Apologies about that, Art J.

It is a ISP homepage service video from CBSnews.com summarzing the recent discovery of the U.S.S. Legarto Collins class submarine found off the shores of Thailand.

It had a crew of 60 I think - reported as "Missing in action" all these years until now.

I could not find anything about it at
CBS news . com
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Again apologies for the link.

dglasal
05-21-2006, 03:09 PM
"U.S.S. Legarto Collins class submarine"

Can you follow up on this? What time period was this submarine in service? I did some research on WWII subs and came up empty so I reckin this is post war.

Low_Flyer_MkVb
05-21-2006, 03:35 PM
This the one?

http://www.thaiwreckdiver.com/lagarto.htm

slipBall
05-21-2006, 03:35 PM
a google search brings up few results, she went down, all hands, May 1945

WB_Outlaw
05-21-2006, 09:01 PM
Wow, at over 200 feet that's a hell of a dive. I think I'll stick to the shallow Oriskany.

--Outlaw.

stugumby
05-22-2006, 10:26 AM
Thanks of a gratefull nation do no justice to their sacrifices. They gave all so their children wouldnt have to, may they rest in peace, and their grandchildren grow to understand and respect their times and what it meant to give the last full measure of devotion.

fair winds and following seas to all

justflyin
05-22-2006, 10:58 AM
May they all rest in peace and their sacrifices be remembered until the end of time. Salute!

From anyone's past knowledge, what happens now in a case like this? Does the US recover the remains from the wreck? Or due to the depths, do they just leave the sub as-is and mark it as a final resting place? I'm not trying to be disrespectful, I was just curious.

Aguila_Azteca
05-22-2006, 05:17 PM
In cases such as this, the wrecks become war graves... and are not to be disturbed by the international law.... one example of this is the arizona in pearl harbor... it still have the remainds of all that sunk with her... as there were not atemped to be recovered

WB_Outlaw
05-23-2006, 11:16 AM
According to the web site posted above, entering the wreck and/or taking artifacts is strictly prohibited. It's sad that this has to be mentioned but it's amazing what some divers will do for a conversation piece. I let my photos start the talking.

--Outlaw.

justflyin
05-23-2006, 12:32 PM
Originally posted by Aguila_Azteca:
In cases such as this, the wrecks become war graves... and are not to be disturbed by the international law.... one example of this is the arizona in pearl harbor... it still have the remainds of all that sunk with her... as there were not atemped to be recovered

Ah yes, I almost forgot about the Arizona. About 900 left within her wreckage, though.

From: USS Arizona (http://dizzy.library.arizona.edu/images/USS_Arizona/history/history.html)

"After the attack the ship was left resting on the bottom with the deck just awash. In the days and weeks following, efforts were made to recover the bodies of the crew and the ship's records. Eventually further recovery of bodies became fruitless, and the bodies of at least 900 crewmen remained in the ship. During 1942 salvage work to recover as much of the ship as was practical began. The masts and superstructure were removed for scrap and the two turrets aft were salvaged for use at shore batteries on Hawaii. The forward part of the ship had received the most damage, and only the guns of turret two were removed while turret one was left in place. On December 1, 1942 the ship was stricken from the registry of U.S. Navy vessels."

GerritJ9
05-24-2006, 03:23 PM
Further to the south, off Poelau Tioman, are the wrecks of two Dutch submarines: O.16 and K.XVII. O.16 carried out a very successful attack on Japanese transports off Patani, sinking four (since they sank in shallow water, the Japanese managed to raise and repair them later on) shortly after hostilities broke out. Recalled to Singapore, she sank after hitting a mine. Initially the bridge party survived the sinking, but only one man managed to reach the shore after swimming for some 35 hours.
K.XVII's fate was unknown for many years- she went missing without a trace in December 1941. Her wreck was discovered in the 1970s. Both submarines had run into a then unknown Japanese minefield, laid before the start of hostilities.