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Cajun76
12-17-2007, 03:07 PM
Wright Brothers First Flight

On December 17, 1903, two brothers from Dayton, Ohio, named Wilbur and Orville Wright, were successful in flying an airplane they built. Their powered aircraft flew for 12 seconds above the sand dunes of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, making them the first men to pilot a heavier-than-air machine that took off on its own power, remained under control, and sustained flight.

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I would like to focus on the positives aerospace has brought us. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

One hundred and four years ago, history was made, and forever changed the world. Nothing exemplifies the rapid advance of technology or driven it so much as aerospace. Everything from lighter/stronger materials, medicine and computers has rode the crest of aerospace technology.

Disasters and medical emergencies can be responded to in record time. Aircraft carriers, arguably the most powerful and influential warships ever built can help provide supplies and fresh water to tsunami victims.

Helicopters pluck flood victims from the roofs of houses and transport accident victims to hospitals within minutes.

Medical experiments fly on the the STS on every mission, and flight medicine has expanded the frontiers of what we know about the human body.

The very basis of composing and transmitting my post is rooted in primitive computers and radios that were made powerful and light enough to fly.

So, on this anniversary, please take a moment to post how aerospace has had a positive effect on your life.

For me, the simple joy of flying and the opportunities I've had to visit other places in a timely manner, relatively speaking, are what I like.

TheGozr
12-17-2007, 03:42 PM
FSX...

F0_Dark_P
12-17-2007, 04:46 PM
Thought you ment this..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3EJ5icvaHk

My favorite punkrock song "Paper Wings" xD

Anyway to the topic, the most positive effect aerospace has had on my life must be that it makes me able to fly to my family in lappland, it just takes me a our rather than to sit on a train for two days http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Then the Tiger Moth of course http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif

ElAurens
12-17-2007, 05:20 PM
http://img520.imageshack.us/img520/6233/firstdu4.jpg

Cajun76
12-17-2007, 10:03 PM
Originally posted by F0_Dark_P:
Thought you ment this..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3EJ5icvaHk

My favorite punkrock song "Paper Wings" xD

Anyway to the topic, the most positive effect aerospace has had on my life must be that it makes me able to fly to my family in lappland, it just takes me a our rather than to sit on a train for two days http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Then the Tiger Moth of course http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif

Well that's what I like about this; get to experience new things. I'll definitely have to check those guys out.

ElAurens: I've got that same plate image somewhere on my HD, thanks for reminding me. Awesome pic.

Copperhead311th
12-17-2007, 10:24 PM
i thought ya ment like paper airplanes. lol

Cajun76
12-17-2007, 10:46 PM
That's how they started my friend. Look how far we have come in only a century and some change.

Cajun76
12-17-2007, 11:16 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/83ES8761a.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/C76616sa.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/FokkerTriplano.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/108563.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/EC92-09241-2a.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/698951a.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/0868437a.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/capt756df30233714d86899ac72b6753209.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/Berkut09.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/hummer.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/45189main_MM_Image_Feature_66_rs4.jpg

Copperhead311th
12-19-2007, 02:29 AM
WTF is THAT?! holy

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/Berkut09.jpg

Surprisingly i have never seen that plane before.

Cajun76
12-19-2007, 07:02 AM
Su-47 Berkut, an advanced technology demonstrator prototype.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sukhoi_Su-47

Developed from the Su-27, first flown in 1997.

jadger
12-19-2007, 10:32 AM
The Germans did it first http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif Karl Jatho and Gustave Weisskopf both flew their own powered aircraft before the Wright brothers. Not to say that it was a single team that invented the first aircraft, many people made innovations that the Wrights incorporated into their aircraft.

JG52Uther
12-19-2007, 10:37 AM
Pictures #2 and #3 are so cool.
Hurry up Knights of the Sky!

Cajun76
12-19-2007, 12:19 PM
Originally posted by jadger:
The Germans did it first http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif Karl Jatho and Gustave Weisskopf both flew their own powered aircraft before the Wright brothers. Not to say that it was a single team that invented the first aircraft, many people made innovations that the Wrights incorporated into their aircraft.

A bit OT, but it never fails to come up when talking about early flight. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/history/q0159.shtml


However, my post was more geared toward looking to the scope and magnitude of our accomplishments since then.

Heliopause
12-19-2007, 01:34 PM
Scanned this from a US magazine a while back..
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b334/PauseHelio/Weiskopf.jpg

Cajun76
12-19-2007, 07:22 PM
Originally posted by Heliopause:
Scanned this from a US magazine a while back..
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b334/PauseHelio/Weiskopf.jpg

I had to save that early 20th century style photoshop. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

While I think its possible to get off the ground with Mr. Whitehead's machine, only one axis of control is properly addressed, and the extra weight of an engine only used for takeoff would be weight better saved or used for primary flight propulsion.

M_Gunz
12-19-2007, 08:27 PM
Originally posted by jadger:
The Germans did it first http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif Karl Jatho and Gustave Weisskopf both flew their own powered aircraft before the Wright brothers. Not to say that it was a single team that invented the first aircraft, many people made innovations that the Wrights incorporated into their aircraft.

They also experimented and coordinated all that they used. They engineered better.
Not the first with powered flight -- first with fully controlled heavier than air powered flight.
When they got to Europe years later, people there were still shifting weight to steer.

In the same period there were races of powered blimps even in the US, I have pictures from an
early 1900's race in St. Louis.

Probably the biggest source of information for any of the pioneers was nature, study of birds.

jadger
12-20-2007, 12:13 AM
When they got to Europe years later, people there were still shifting weight to steer.

What's wrong with that? I do that in my '96 Mazda B2300 truck, especially on those patches of ice on the roads http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif That's still controlling the aircraft, albeit not as effectively as with the rudder. And in America other aircraft builders where still doing the same thing, it's not like all of a sudden everyone copied the Wright brothers, there were still many people experimenting.

Cajun76
12-20-2007, 02:39 AM
You know, the person that came up with the lever didn't invent sticks and rocks. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

The Wrights didn't invent wings, propellers and fabric either. No one is saying they did, afaik.

They did do a lot of research, even throwing out faulty information tables from mentors and painstakingly creating new ones.

Their main contribution was controlling flight on 3 axis. That was the pivotal step that allowed flight to take off, pun intended.

Just getting off the ground is not enough. If it was, Sir Hiram Maxim would probably have a better claim than most anyone.

Here is the summary from the article I posted earlier:


While each of the pioneers described above can make a serious claim to being the first to fly, the ultimate determination really comes down to how you decide to measure success. It is not in question whether any of these innovators had a keen insight into aviation, for they all designed and built amazing creations that pushed the bounds of existing knowledge. Some even managed short hops into the air, but how do we decide what constitutes flight and what doesn't? The criteria most researchers have applied is a craft that could only sustain its flight thanks to the power of its engine and was fitted with a control system allowing the pilot to maintain his course. The flight must also be well-documented by first-hand witnesses, and perhaps most important of all, the flight must be repeatable. The accomplishments of the pioneers described above all fail on at least one of these criterion whereas the Wright Flyer does not. Most of these men even admitted themselves that they had not accomplished what the Wrights had done.

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Regardless, I think the most important lesson to learn from this discussion is that the Wrights did not step into a vacuum and miraculously succeed in doing what no one thought possible.</span> Many aviators around the world believed that heavier-than-air flight was inevitable, and the knowledge they gained through trial and error was vital to those who followed. The lessons they learned became the blocks on which the Wrights built the world's first controllable and sustainable aircraft.

The person that invented the gun didn't conceive of putting sulfur, charcoal and potassium nitrate together for the first time to power his device. That doesn't take away from the fact that he did it though.