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Low_Flyer_MkII
11-22-2005, 09:17 AM
Lee Marvin cropped up in another thread. He was with the USMC in WWII, recieving a Purple Heart.
This led to a brief discussion with my old chum Panther, who mentioned James Stewart being a bomber pilot. It set my mind to thinking - how many other movie heroes did it for real? All nations.

Let's be having them.

Dunkelgrun
11-22-2005, 09:26 AM
quote:

Good idea for a thread - war movie actors who did it for real, or has it been done?


Yeah, I think it's been done, but

Jimmy Stewart
Audie Murphy
Richard Todd
James Doohan
Spike Milligan
Peter Sellers
Harry Secombe
Michael Bentine
Eddie Albert
James Arness
Ernest Borgnine
Mel Brooks
Douglas Fairbanks Jr.
Henry Fonda
Glenn Ford
Clark Gable
Audrey Hepburn
Patrick MacNee
David Niven
Jack Palance
Tyrone Power
Anthony Quayle
Jason Robards Jr
Jack Warden
Humphrey Bogart (WW1 !!!)

Pinched a lot of these from this site: http://www.jodavidsmeyer.com/combat/military/actors_in_wwii.html

Cheers!

ploughman
11-22-2005, 09:32 AM
This one too. (http://usaattacked.com/Hollywood/flipside.html)

p1ngu666
11-22-2005, 09:33 AM
pickard?
star of target for tonight, matyred on the amiens prison raid.

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-22-2005, 09:39 AM
Didn't know about Alec ******ss.

shotdownski
11-22-2005, 10:28 AM
Funny. Ronny Raygun listed number two for staying in Hollywood and making movies, what a hero.

DxyFlyr
11-22-2005, 10:51 AM
Reagan used his talent in a non-comabatant role. From what I can tell, he did it very well. There are a lot of folks back then who never saw combat that I still consider heroes.

berg417448
11-22-2005, 11:00 AM
Originally posted by shotdownski:
Funny. Ronny Raygun listed number two for staying in Hollywood and making movies, what a hero.

Reagan made training films. I've seen a few of them and they actually are quite good.

F19_Olli72
11-22-2005, 11:28 AM
Ernst Udet, in the late 20's and early 30's he made about half dozen movies. He mostly played himself though.

p1ngu666
11-22-2005, 11:36 AM
he was rather good tho.. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-22-2005, 11:38 AM
Originally posted by F19_Olli72:
Ernst Udet, in the late 20's and early 30's he made about half dozen movies. He mostly played himself though.


Interesting, I didn't know that .

As cameos like "Hey look! That's Ernst Udet over there!", or in movies based on his exploits?

F19_Olli72
11-22-2005, 11:57 AM
Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkII:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by F19_Olli72:
Ernst Udet, in the late 20's and early 30's he made about half dozen movies. He mostly played himself though.


Interesting, I didn't know that .

As cameos like "Hey look! That's Ernst Udet over there!", or in movies based on his exploits? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Mostly fictional adventure movies set in exotic enviroments (Africa, the NorthPole etc), a couple was with Leni Riefenstahl. He also sometimes filmed aerial scenes so he doubled as a photographer.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0879855/

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-22-2005, 12:01 PM
Thank you very much, Olli72. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

BSS_CUDA
11-22-2005, 12:20 PM
Audie Murphy was a WW2 CMH winner that turned movie star not the other way around.

how many know that it is a federal crime to buy or sell the CMH? even to wear it is a federal crime if it was not awarded to you by congress.

Fox_3
11-22-2005, 12:27 PM
US child actor Jackie Cooghan was a casvac pilot in Burma.

Peter Ustinov was David Niven's batman (valet) for a time.

Micheal Caine was an infantryman during the Korean war.

nickdanger3
11-22-2005, 12:28 PM
Don't know if he counts since he was a noncombatant, but Lebeau from Hogan's Heros was a vet of sorts:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0165145/bio

Sharpe26
11-22-2005, 12:46 PM
anyone remember Combat America? if you do, Clark Gable made it and for some of the footage he also flew on combat missions.

georgeo76
11-22-2005, 01:05 PM
Both Peter Sellers and George C Scott were in the military. They also have other stuff in common.

Sellers was injured; he has a string in his leg

arcadeace
11-22-2005, 02:41 PM
I think this is a subject a lot of Americans should know. As far as free-born Europeans, well, whatever http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif The US is still the reason for sin.

Some good links posted, and Ploughman out of all the members here I wouldn't have expected you to post yours. Not to insult you but... I agree with you; its spot on. Straight forward and comprehensive. As with the original link I'm surprised with some of these folks as I had no idea. And yes, we have had 2 Hollywoods.

Good thread http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-22-2005, 02:43 PM
Thank 'ee kindly sir,

Denholm Elliot was a P.O.W. Bomber crew, I think.

ploughman
11-22-2005, 02:55 PM
What I do now?

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-22-2005, 03:01 PM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
What I do now?

Chill, baby - it was a complement.

arcadeace
11-22-2005, 03:05 PM
Lol you never know http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif

StellarRat
11-22-2005, 03:05 PM
Christopher Lee was in the SAS.

ploughman
11-22-2005, 03:17 PM
Originally posted by StellarRat:
Christopher Lee was in the SAS.

**** off he was not!

Was he?

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-22-2005, 03:30 PM
He might well have been.

http://www.christopherleeweb.com/modules.php?name=Biography

"Christopher Lee was educated at Summer Fields preparatory school, took a scholarship at Eton College and Wellington College where he was a classical scholar in Greek and Latin. After leaving school he worked as an office boy and messenger in the city of London at the salary of 1 pound a week and during five years of World War II he served in the Royal Air Force and Special Forces. He was decorated for distinguished service and held the rank of Flight Lieutenant."

blakduk
11-22-2005, 03:32 PM
Christopher Lee not only fought for the British secret service during WW2, he also apparently fought for the Finns during '39.
A great quote i read by Peter Jackson (of Lord of the Rings fame) was that he was quite disturbed by Lee's intimate knowledge of what a man sounds like when he is stabbed!
As for Ronald Reagen- he apparently was medically unfit for duty. It seems his eyesight was so bad he could barely see his leading ladies http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif I disagreed strongly with his politics but cant really question his courage.
The movie star who disapointed me most was Marion Morrison (aka John Wayne). He dodged the draft and spent the rest of his life pretending to be a hero http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

gbollin
11-22-2005, 03:54 PM
John Wayne Medically unfitt for the armed servises. He was considered a little to old for
the Millitary in WW2.

Daiichidoku
11-22-2005, 03:59 PM
no wonder lee marvin was so good in "hell in the pacific"

never knew

blakduk
11-22-2005, 03:59 PM
gbollin- that's not exactly accurate.
He avoided the draft by declaring he was needed by his family. In 1941 he was in his early 30's, well within the age for the draft.
He squibbed it and many veterans knew it too!

Daiichidoku
11-22-2005, 04:00 PM
tom is SO the opposite of ALL these guys on all levels http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

blakduk
11-22-2005, 04:06 PM
Just found this to back me up...

From Wikipedia:
"Although appearing in many war films and frequently being eulogized as an "American hero," Wayne never served in the Armed Forces. However, his friend Bob Hope speculated that Wayne did more for the WWII war effort as an actor, than he ever could on the battlefield. Between 1940, when the military draft was reinstated and the end of World War II in 1945, he remained in Hollywood and made 21 movies. (Among them was Cecil B. DeMille's Reap the Wild Wind (1942), in which he portrayed one of the few less-than-honorable characters in his career.) He was of draft age (34) at the time of Pearl Harbor in 1941, but asked for and received a deferral for family dependency, a classification of 3-A. This was later changed to a deferment in the national interest, 2-A."

blakduk
11-22-2005, 04:17 PM
The guy i really admire was Jimmy Stewart- he volunteered before the war, got rejected on medical grounds but succeeded in gaining entry to the airforce after Pearl Harbour. He flew for the 8th AF over europe as a pilot of a B24. Apparently he even flew a B52 over Vietnam http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif
I remember hearing about his exploits after seeing the original 'Flight of the Phoenix' movie. He was also interviewed in the BBC series 'The World at War' about his experiences in WW2.
Amazing guy http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

snafu73
11-22-2005, 07:07 PM
The Astronomer Patrick Moore was a navigator in Wellingtons, legend has it that on one mission the pilot and co-pilot were mortally wounded and Mr. Moore made his way forward to the cockpit and got the plane home!

Ironically his wife to be was killed in the London Blitz, and he's remained celibate ever since. I once read an interview with him were he was asked if he ever thought about her, he said after all this time... sometimes I can go ten minutes without thinking about her.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/cry.gif

The Sci-Fi writer Arthur C. Clarke was also in the R.A.F. but did'nt fly, he was a boffin working on experimental stuff.

Another Sci-Fi writer, Isaac Asimov served in the US navy, he was gratefull that his Grandparents emigrated to the US from Russia because he remarked that almost all the young men his age around the Smolensk area, where his family originated from, died in heavy fighting.

I know this thread is a movie heroes one, but I thought I'd add this anyway.

Enforcer572005
11-22-2005, 08:57 PM
Victor Mature (sampson) helmed LCIs in several invasions in the coast guard (who operated most of those i believe).

Regarding REgan's role, he did a really humorous interview once about that....he got a commision right after it started, thought he was going to war in the USAAF, and wound up assigned to hollywood to make training films. He never imagined a soldier being posted at his home. THose films were very effective....his talents were put to good use.

Clark Gable disobeyed orders and went along as a gunner on a few B17 misns, as he was trained as that. He got chewed really bad for that....

My grandfather was a technician at a textile mill, joined the army, and wound up assigned.......as a technician at the same textile mill in atlanta, which made military products....at about a fifth his salary. I always laughed when he told me that story and how frustrating it was. Same as Reagan and several others. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

DAvid Niven was in the SAS.

Eddie albert was navy and was at Tarawa, picking up wounded marines in a boat under fire...great interview on history channel about that.


Stewart flew many misns in B24s, eventually became a general in the AF reserves. HIs recruitment film made at the beginning is classic. He did fly along on several B52 misns, but not as the pilot I think.

Owlsphone
11-22-2005, 09:01 PM
It may not be war related, but Steve McQueen walked the walk and talked the talk I'd say.

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-23-2005, 05:20 AM
McQueen spent his discharge grant on acting lessons, apparently.

Inadaze
11-23-2005, 05:30 AM
Richard Todd - When World War II began, he served as an officer and paratrooper. After landing in Normandy on D-Day he met up with Major John Howard on Pegasus Bridge €" he would later appear in two films in which this scene was recreated: in D-Day the Sixth of June (1956) he played the commanding officer of the unit in which both of them served, and in The Longest Day (1962) he played Major Howard himself.

Zeus-cat
11-23-2005, 05:32 AM
I heard somewhere that Jimmy Stewart requested that he be allowed to fly a single B-52 flight over Vietnam. He stayed in the reserves for many ears and eventually achieved the rank of general. I think he was a general at the time of the request and the military reluctantly agreed to his request.

The idea of having Jimmy Stewart shot down over Vietnam must have scared half to death anybody who knew about it. The U.S. kept it secret for years. Obviously, they didn't want the enemy to know about it as they would probably try and make a special effort to shoot him down. After it was over the U.S. saw no sense making an issue out of it as he might be a target for some anti-war activist.

Zeus-cat

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-23-2005, 05:36 AM
Good stuff from Jarink in the "Tora, Tora, Tora" thread



Posted 23.November.2005 01:32
quote:
Originally posted by jds1978:

quote:
Good idea for a thread - war movie actors who did it for real, or has it been done?


Ed McMahon (Publishers Clearing House, Johnny Carson) flew Corsairs in the Pacific.

Jimmy Stewart flew in 8th AF (Correct?)

Ditto for one of the Rooney boys (Mickey? Andy?)

Glen Miller (Jazz musician) died on a USO flight. I believe he was Army


Good idea.

Clark Gable
Walter Matthau
Jack Palance
Tyrone Power
Robert Stack
Eddie Albert
Charlton Heston
Ernie Borgnine
Charles Bronson
George C. Scott
David Niven
Sir Alec Guiness
Audie Murphy (OK, so he was a soldier first)

A rather exhaustive list of actors who served in WWII is here:

http://www.jodavidsmeyer.com/combat/military/actors_in_wwii.html

Jimmy Stewart is the most fascinating to me. Here is a quote from http://www.b24bestweb.com:
"Joined USAAC in 1940, was initially refused entry because he was 5 pounds under the required 148 pounds, but he talked the recruitment officer into ignoring the test. Eventually became a Colonel, 8th AF Sqn Cmdr 703 BS 445 BG, and Ops Officer 453 BG (&rt;456 BG), awarded the Air Medal, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Croix de Guerre, and 7 battle stars. Flew B-52 and B-58 in Vietnam. In 1959, while in the USAFR, he was promoted to BrigGenl, the highest ranking actor in military history (but would not allow his war record to be used in movies or as publicity)."



Turns out Audrey Hepburn was a child courier for the Dutch resistance.

I didn't realise that Jimmy Stewart was so highly decorated.

panther3485
11-23-2005, 08:50 AM
Quote:
Turns out Audrey Hepburn was a child courier for the Dutch resistance.

When I saw Audrey Hepburn on the list, I thought, "What the fock did she do? Was she old enough?" Now I know. Hats off to Audrey! (RIP)

panther3485

Pirschjaeger
11-23-2005, 08:57 AM
Well, does the star have to have seen some sort of combat to be mentioned?

Just thought it was odd no one mentioned Elvis Presley. I no nothing of his service but I know he served.

Fritz

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-23-2005, 09:01 AM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Well, does the star have to have seen some sort of combat to be mentioned?

Just thought it was odd no one mentioned Elvis Presley. I no nothing of his service but I know he served.

Fritz

No combat required - Elvis was drafted, the Everly Brothers volunteered for the Marine Corps. Big credit to Elvis for not crying off though. He ended as a tank driver in southern Germany.

Pirschjaeger
11-23-2005, 09:04 AM
Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkII:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Well, does the star have to have seen some sort of combat to be mentioned?

Just thought it was odd no one mentioned Elvis Presley. I no nothing of his service but I know he served.

Fritz

No combat required - Elvis was drafted, the Everly Brothers volunteered for the Marine Corps. Big credit to Elvis for not crying off though. He ended as a tank driver in southern Germany. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Really? Tank driver? That's dangerous. I have a new level of respect for him.

Fritz

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-23-2005, 09:11 AM
Micheal Caine gained a certain nortoriety for what became known as 'the Eisenhower incident' while he was serving as a conscript in Korea, before he was famous. It seems Ike was inspecting a British infantry unit and asked a private if he was going to stay on in the army when his national service was up. "Am I f***!" came the reply in what became a well-known voice.

ploughman
11-23-2005, 10:08 AM
Originally posted by panther3485:
Quote:
Turns out Audrey Hepburn was a child courier for the Dutch resistance.

When I saw Audrey Hepburn on the list, I thought, "What the fock did she do? Was she old enough?" Now I know. Hats off to Audrey! (RIP)

panther3485

Audrey was offered a part in "A Bridge Too Far" but declined. Having lived through the battle she couldn't face reliving it as an actress. Her elfin beauty was partly derived from nearly starving to death during the winter of 1944-45.
She does the voice over at the begining of the movie though.

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-23-2005, 10:28 AM
Dirk Bogarde was among the first British troops to enter Belsen.

Daiichidoku
11-23-2005, 11:30 AM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkII:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Well, does the star have to have seen some sort of combat to be mentioned?

Just thought it was odd no one mentioned Elvis Presley. I no nothing of his service but I know he served.

Fritz

No combat required - Elvis was drafted, the Everly Brothers volunteered for the Marine Corps. Big credit to Elvis for not crying off though. He ended as a tank driver in southern Germany. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Really? Tank driver? That's dangerous. I have a new level of respect for him.

Fritz </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

tank driving in 1956 germany is dangerous?

DxyFlyr
11-23-2005, 11:41 AM
Speaking of women... anyone mention Julia Child, yet? Worked for the OSS in Asia during WW2.

gbollin
11-23-2005, 08:34 PM
As a retired Army Sergeant and former recruiter for the Army. The maximun age for service in the Army without any proir service is 31 years of age. Unless you are trained in the medical
field or Clergy.John Wayne to my Knowledge never passed himself off as war veteran.
He never said he was in the millitary at all.
He just supported the millitary.

WWSensei
11-23-2005, 09:19 PM
I believe Eddie Albert won a medal for his rescuing several Marines at Tarawa...

Pirschjaeger
11-23-2005, 09:36 PM
Originally posted by Daiichidoku:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkII:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Well, does the star have to have seen some sort of combat to be mentioned?

Just thought it was odd no one mentioned Elvis Presley. I no nothing of his service but I know he served.

Fritz

No combat required - Elvis was drafted, the Everly Brothers volunteered for the Marine Corps. Big credit to Elvis for not crying off though. He ended as a tank driver in southern Germany. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Really? Tank driver? That's dangerous. I have a new level of respect for him.

Fritz </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

tank driving in 1956 germany is dangerous? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

56'? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

So much for misguided respect. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

HunglikePony
11-23-2005, 11:40 PM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by panther3485:
Quote:
Turns out Audrey Hepburn was a child courier for the Dutch resistance.

When I saw Audrey Hepburn on the list, I thought, "What the fock did she do? Was she old enough?" Now I know. Hats off to Audrey! (RIP)

panther3485

Audrey was offered a part in "A Bridge Too Far" but declined. Having lived through the battle she couldn't face reliving it as an actress. Her elfin beauty was partly derived from nearly starving to death during the winter of 1944-45.
She does the voice over at the begining of the movie though. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


You is wrong, not Hepburn doing voice over at start of movie but actually woman that is in movie, plays lady that owns mansion where wounded brits go at end.

StellarRat
11-23-2005, 11:51 PM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by StellarRat:
Christopher Lee was in the SAS.

**** off he was not!

Was he? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>He was...http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Aside from that little fact, he was considered an expert on the Lord of the Rings by no less than Peter Jackson, and (I'll take a chance here) I think most of you would agree he was the best actor in Star Wars II, and III specially if you compare the quality of the acting to that joke that played Aniken.

ploughman
11-24-2005, 01:47 AM
Originally posted by HunglikePony:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Ploughman:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by panther3485:
Quote:
Turns out Audrey Hepburn was a child courier for the Dutch resistance.

When I saw Audrey Hepburn on the list, I thought, "What the fock did she do? Was she old enough?" Now I know. Hats off to Audrey! (RIP)

panther3485

Audrey was offered a part in "A Bridge Too Far" but declined. Having lived through the battle she couldn't face reliving it as an actress. Her elfin beauty was partly derived from nearly starving to death during the winter of 1944-45.
She does the voice over at the begining of the movie though. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


You is wrong, not Hepburn doing voice over at start of movie but actually woman that is in movie, plays lady that owns mansion where wounded brits go at end. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


You is right. Liv Ullman.

T'was the role Audrey turned down, most commentators say it was because she wanted too much $s, but I did see a show in which she said she couldn't face reliving those times again, who knows?

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-24-2005, 11:48 AM
Not really a movie star, but Her Maj qualified as a vehicle mechanic in the ATS when she was plain old Princess Elizabeth.

ploughman
11-24-2005, 12:00 PM
Ah, the face that launched a thousand ships.

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-24-2005, 12:13 PM
I think you're getting Her Maj confused with Helen Mirren there mate...or was it Helen of Troy? Anyhoo....Seems Leslie Howard was a passenger on a plane shot down because the Germans thought Churchill might have been on board. Another one for the conspiracy theorists here: http://www.law.uga.edu/academics/profiles/dwilkes_more/other_1ashley.html

ploughman
11-24-2005, 12:23 PM
No, really. She's must've launched like a thousand ships.

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-24-2005, 12:24 PM
Who? Helen Mirren? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

ploughman
11-24-2005, 12:35 PM
Not sure on HM's ship launching stats but Her Maj has been at it for years, bish bash with the Moet, and so she must be in the high hundreds or perhaps she's EVEN done herself a complete Helen of Troy.

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-24-2005, 12:39 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/guide/images/400/alassmithandjones_2.jpg

Oh, right. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif

Did you know that James Mason was a conscientious objector? Then he went on to make all that money by playing Rommel.

jds1978
11-24-2005, 06:49 PM
Rod Serling (Twilight Zone creator, director, screen-writer) was a US paratrooper

Vanulla_Ace
11-24-2005, 08:19 PM
I'm pretty sure Leslie Nielsen of Naked Gun fame was a tailgunner in some kind of bomber. I also seen to remember, that he actually has som form of hearing loss because of the noises he was subjected to...

DrHerb
11-24-2005, 09:02 PM
R Lee Ermy (of full metal jacket fame) was an actual marine drill sargent

GSNei
11-24-2005, 10:32 PM
Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkII:
Thank 'ee kindly sir,

Denholm Elliot was a P.O.W. Bomber crew, I think.

I work in movies (lighting). An assistant director I was working with told me that he once had to get Denholm Elliot out of his trailer because they were ready for him but they were six or seven hours behind so he had been waiting all day. The AD apologized and Elliot said that was OK - After the night he was sitting in the tail of his Lancaster one second, and the next second falling through the night sky over Germany, his plane and crewmates completely gone, never seen again, being late to set was really no big deal. I always thought that was pretty cool.

JV44Rall
11-25-2005, 01:42 AM
I heard that Forrest Tucker - Sarge in "F Troup" - was a combat Marine.
And don't forget Charles Durning who was bayoneted, captured during the Bulge, escaped and then was later shot and was in hospital at the end of the war. http://www.pbs.org/memorialdayconcert/wwii/durning.html
All that from the guy who put the moves on Dustin Hoffman in Tootsie.
A real man's man, I'd say. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Von_Rat
11-25-2005, 05:33 AM
i met forrest tucker once, i was working cleaning furniture and cleaned his couch in the 70s. he was a nice guy from the little i talked to him. gave me a big tip and told me to go and drink some beer after work, he himself was pretty smashed at the time.

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-25-2005, 08:15 AM
Just in from CNN.com: Thanks to Sharpe26.

LOS ANGELES, California (AP) -- Actor Pat Morita, whose portrayal of the wise and dry-witted Mr. Miyagi in "The Karate Kid" earned him an Oscar nomination, has died. He was 73.

Born in northern California on June 28, 1932, the son of migrant fruit pickers, Morita spent most of his early years in the hospital with spinal tuberculosis. He later recovered only to be sent to a Japanese-American internment camp in Arizona during World War II.

"One day I was an invalid," he recalled in a 1989 AP interview. "The next day I was public enemy No. 1 being escorted to an internment camp by an FBI agent wearing a piece."

Thought it might be of interest.