PDA

View Full Version : Allied pilots/Axis machines



J.M.LLOYD
08-04-2007, 01:38 AM
I know that there was an extensive program after the war,where those vaunted German fighters,109/190 were tested and evaluated by Allied pilots. But does anyone know if any German fighter pilots who had surrendered to the Western Allies were ever given the chance to fly the British and American front line fighters.[Galland in a Spitfire?]I have always wondered, it could have been a private invitation and politics could have been kept well away?......Just a thought???

J.M.LLOYD
08-04-2007, 01:38 AM
I know that there was an extensive program after the war,where those vaunted German fighters,109/190 were tested and evaluated by Allied pilots. But does anyone know if any German fighter pilots who had surrendered to the Western Allies were ever given the chance to fly the British and American front line fighters.[Galland in a Spitfire?]I have always wondered, it could have been a private invitation and politics could have been kept well away?......Just a thought???

Taylortony
08-04-2007, 02:29 PM
Yes

The forerunner to the Harrier, the Kestrel was evaluated by the Tripartite Evaluation Squadron (TES)

The TES was formally set up on 15 October 1964 in the UK, under the command of Wing Commander D. McL. Scrimgeour, with pilots from the RAF, Luftwaffe, USAF, US Navy, and US Army performing flight tests. The US Marines were interested, but did not participate. The Kestrels sported a "TES" insignia that combined USAF and Luftwaffe insignia with the RAF roundel like a pie with three slices. Wing Commander Scrimgeour was assisted by two deputies, one from the US Navy and the other from the West German Luftwaffe. The deputy from the Luftwaffe was Oberst Gerhardt Barkhorn, one of Germany's top aces, with 301 kills to his credit.

I read somewhere that when evaluating Kestrel he had an engine failure in the hover and as it came crashing down to earth causing a lot of damage, fellow members of the unit rushed out to see if he was OK, they met him climbing out of the cockpit smiling and he said to them, "make that 302 Allied Aircraft Destroyed" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif


http://www.vectorsite.net/avav8_1.html

StG2_Schlachter
08-04-2007, 02:44 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

J.M.LLOYD
08-04-2007, 07:52 PM
I read that Eric Hartman after serving 10 years in a Soviet prison camp, returned to Germany in 1955 and soon was given command of West Germanys first all jet unit,"Jagdgeschwader 71 Richthofen" operating Canadian F86 Sabres.
"What a life"

f.ip2
08-05-2007, 04:21 PM
Were there even many left afterwards?

To my knowledge many of the good pilots never
survived the war.

Bo_Nidle
08-05-2007, 04:53 PM
Johannes Steinhoff and Gunther Rall and Walter Krupinski all held high positions in the West German air force in NATO.

Kongo Otto
08-05-2007, 05:22 PM
Günther Rall settled in West Germany after the war and continued his career in the Luftwaffe der Bundeswehr after the re-militarization of West Germany in 1955. From 1 January 1971 to 31 March 1973, he held the position of Inspekteur der Luftwaffe der Bundeswehr and from 1 April 1974 to 13 October 1975, he was a military attache with NATO. At the end of his career he had attained the rank of Lieutenant General. In 2004, he wrote his memories "Mein Flugbuch".
He is also Honorary Fellow of the "Society of Experimental Test Pilots"(SETP)


Johannes Steinhoff
After the war he married Ursula, and they had one daughter, also named Ursula - later the wife of retired Colorado State Senator Michael Bird.

Steinhoff meanwhile recognised the situation of post war Germany, and was invited by West Germany's new interim government to rebuild the Luftwaffe within NATO, eventually rising to the rank of full general. Steinhoff served as Chief of Staff and acting Commander Allied Air Forces Central Europe (1965-1966), Chief of Staff of the Luftwaffe (1966 - 1970) and later as Chairman of NATO's Military Committee (1971 - 1974). He retired in 1974.

He wrote a book called The Final Hours (ISBN 1-57488-863-3) detailing a late-war plot against Hermann Göing. He also wrote a vivid account of his time in Italy; "Messerschmitts over Sicily: Diary of a Luftwaffe Fighter Commander" (Stackpole Military History Series Paperback)

Steinhoff received numerous honours for his work on the structure of the post war Luftwaffe and the integration of the German Federal Armed Forces into NATO, including: The Order of Merit with star, the American Legion of Merit and the French Légion d'honneur.

Gerhard Barkhorn married his long time girlfriend Christl after the war and he had three children with her. Barkhorn joined the Bundesluftwaffe in 1956, and retired a Lieutenant General in 1976. He and his wife Christl were involved in a car accident on 6 January 1983; his wife was killed instantly, but Barkhorn died in the hospital on 8 January 1983.

Walter Krupinski:
Released from captivity in September, by November 1952 entered the German provisional defense ministry. Given the rank of major in 1957, Krupinski went to England to lead the first post war German jet fighter wing. In 1966 Krupinski took command of the German forces of the Luftwaffen-Ausbildungs-Kommando in Texas with the rank of brigadier general. In July 1969 Walter Krupinski became commander of the 3rd Luftwaffe division. In 1971 he became chief of staff of 2 ATAF. In October 1974 Krupinski was promoted commanding officer of the airfleet. Due to the Rudel Scandal he was forced into early retirement on 8 November 1976 holding the rank of Lieutenant-general. Walter Krupinski died in Neunkirchen-Seelscheid in 2000.