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b2spirita
07-27-2010, 04:21 PM
Ive decided to start learning some judo in September, for all the usual reasons people give when starting such a new thing. I did do a little before, but it was over a decade ago and i cant remember any of it...(christ, im getting old already http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif )

My brother learns Ju-Jitsu (sp?)and is looking to take MMA classes when he goes off to uni.

Anyone else practice martial arts? Stories?

Urufu_Shinjiro
07-27-2010, 04:56 PM
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4054/4696468942_fdd2d9739d_b.jpg

Does this count as a martial art?

As for unarmed combat, I've always wanted to study Aikido (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iq_-rhdmBxA) , kinda fits my philosophy.

LEBillfish
07-27-2010, 05:54 PM
Does swinging a mean iron skillet count as a martial art?

K2

Messaschnitzel
07-27-2010, 06:02 PM
Yeah, I've studied:

American Kenpo- 4 yrs
Several styles of Escrima- 20+ yrs
Villabrea Kali- 2 yrs
Yang style Tai Chi Chuan- 1 1/2 yrs
Danzan Ryu Jujutsu- 3 yrs
Yoshinkan Aikido- 3 yrs
Shinkendo- 5 yrs
Tendo Ryu Naginata- 1 yr
Kyudo- 2 yrs
Choy Lay Fut- 2 yrs and currently.

I've boxed since I was 9 years old and am doing so currently, and I was fighting SCA regularly from 1986-2006. For whatever it's worth, I consider these activities to be martial 'sports' and not martial 'arts' since they both have rules and regulations designed for the sake of safety and civility. They could however be considered martial arts if the rules were lifted. You'd probably see the sports mentioned above evolve dramatically to cover the aspects of a potentially lethal encounter. To wit: the prohibition on thumbs, rabbit punching, clinches, etc, and the rules prohibiting the targeting of the hand and the area of the knee and below in SCA fighting allow these sports not to have to focus on protection of these areas. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

FlixFlix
07-27-2010, 10:12 PM
12 years Wing Tsun Kung Fu.
Saved my bacon in two occasions.

Along the way some Escrima.

ImpStarDuece
07-27-2010, 10:31 PM
Into my fifth year of capoeira.

Not the most 'practical' of martial arts, but with classes that typically have more females than males, who cares?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Mf_PTB8juc

Urufu_Shinjiro
07-28-2010, 06:24 AM
Originally posted by Messaschnitzel:
They could however be considered martial arts if the rules were lifted. You'd probably see the sports mentioned above evolve dramatically to cover the aspects of a potentially lethal encounter. To wit: the prohibition on thumbs, rabbit punching, clinches, etc, and the rules prohibiting the targeting of the hand and the area of the knee and below in SCA fighting allow these sports not to have to focus on protection of these areas. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

Agreed, I'm lucky enough to have a fencing teacher who has two practices, the official Shire fighter practice, and then an unofficial practice in his back yard, at the unofficial practice we are taught things that would get you banned from the tourney field for life! Pommel strikes, knees, elbows, foot stomp, nasty nasty infighting. My instructor is pretty serious about fencing as a martial art and does indeed make a large distinction between the sport on the SCA tourney field, a duel of honor, and an outright street brawl.


P.S. Nice resume http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Worf101
07-28-2010, 07:16 AM
53 years in the school of McFilthy and McNasty.
3.5 year in Uncle Sam's U.S. Army finishing school.
7 plus years of down and dirty wrasslin' with my boy. His favorite lament:

"Why don't you fight fair you fat basterd!!!"

This is usually after I've twisted or bitten some sensitive bit or forced him to tap out lest he lose a limb. My typical respnse is:

"I've never seen a fair in my life, scoreboard beyatch!!!!"

Worf

x6BL_Brando
07-28-2010, 07:58 AM
When I first started my sentence in Borstal, I was buddied up with a quiet Irish guy called Frank D*******. We'd shared a cell in Wormwood Scrubs while waiting to be transferred to our final destination, and it was lucky that we both got sent to the same place.

There's a lot of jockeying about when new guys arrive, as social status is decided. Are you leanable-on, are you dumb enough to give up your tobacco ration, can you be bullied into supporting the hard men (?) and so on. All this when all you want to do is your time, who needs it?

Anyway, Franky had a hidden talent - karate - which he only demonstrated infrequently. But when he did it was profoundly effective. One evening during our first week there he wandered into the dormitory that I shared with another fifteen young guys. We chatted a bit and then he got me to be his "target dummy" for a quick demo. I had already been into Yoga for a couple of years, so when he asked me to stand with a cigarette in my mouth and keep very still I wasn't particularly fazed. He stood facing me for about twenty seconds and then kicked the cigarette clean out of my lips, so quickly that it was hard to notice that he'd moved at all. I certainly felt the wind of his foot flashing by my nose, and heard the two halves of the cigarette hit the polished wooden floor, but Frank was just standing in the same place, with a gentle grin on his face.

There was a mild uproar as everybody demanded that he "do it again" but Frank was having none of it. He said something about getting back to his dormitory before lights out, and off he went, leaving a lot of questions unanswered. But the direct effect was that all the bullying and pecking-order stuff dried up from that moment on. No-one messed with him, or, by association, me either. He didn't put himself out there, and rejected the occasional challenge by saying " no thank-you" with a smile. I remember when some dude was coming on strong; Frank kept quiet, but gave another demonstration the next day by leaning an improbable thickness of roof-slates against a wall and then breaking them in one strike of his bare foot. His erstwhile challenger just faded into the background and stayed there http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

On the odd occasions we talked about it he would tell me about the meditations and the clarity that went with the open hand. He told me about growing up in Belfast in the 50s and 60s, and how he hated the necessity of walking around with his eyes down and his head sunk down between his shoulders. "Being aware of what's going on all around you is the key to survival in dangerous places - and you're screwed if you can't walk around with your eyes open. Karate gives me the ability to react effectively to threats, and to keep my head up in dangerous places. But I never seek conflict."

We lost contact after a couple of years and I heard he'd gone home to Belfast. I hope everything went well for him, and I never forgot how his 'mild reminders' made my incarceration a much safer experience than it might have been.
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

B

Messaschnitzel
07-28-2010, 11:20 AM
Originally posted by Urufu_Shinjiro:
Agreed, I'm lucky enough to have a fencing teacher who has two practices, the official Shire fighter practice, and then an unofficial practice in his back yard, at the unofficial practice we are taught things that would get you banned from the tourney field for life! Pommel strikes, knees, elbows, foot stomp, nasty nasty infighting. My instructor is pretty serious about fencing as a martial art and does indeed make a large distinction between the sport on the SCA tourney field, a duel of honor, and an outright street brawl.

The thing that I appreciate about martial sports is that they allow you to move, strike, or otherwise follow through at full contact, and not worry too much about getting messed up. It helps get folks past what I call the 'flinch factor', and to keep on going if possible when they get hit. In other words, not freeze up or pull up short when they get punched in the nose or mouth and see their own blood for example, and still have the presence of mind to keep going and deal some to their opponent. It's easier said than done in boxing though, cos I know I've been sent to lala-land a few times way back when.

Ref- "Hey! hey, look at me! How many fingers am I holding up?"

Me- "Uh, two...I think."

Ref- "What city are you fighting in, what's the name of it?"

Me- "Mommmmma, izzat yoooou?"

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

As far as the resume is concerned, thanks! Sometimes I wonder exactly how much money I've spent on this hobby over the years, but I won't complain though because it's helped me out plenty and still keeps me in shape.

JarheadEd
07-28-2010, 11:30 AM
Originally posted by LEBillfish:
Does swinging a mean iron skillet count as a martial art?

K2

Effective, but technically it falls more under "Marital" art. Just saying.

b2spirita
07-28-2010, 03:49 PM
Originally posted by Urufu_Shinjiro:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Messaschnitzel:
They could however be considered martial arts if the rules were lifted. You'd probably see the sports mentioned above evolve dramatically to cover the aspects of a potentially lethal encounter. To wit: the prohibition on thumbs, rabbit punching, clinches, etc, and the rules prohibiting the targeting of the hand and the area of the knee and below in SCA fighting allow these sports not to have to focus on protection of these areas. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

Agreed, I'm lucky enough to have a fencing teacher who has two practices, the official Shire fighter practice, and then an unofficial practice in his back yard, at the unofficial practice we are taught things that would get you banned from the tourney field for life! Pommel strikes, knees, elbows, foot stomp, nasty nasty infighting. My instructor is pretty serious about fencing as a martial art and does indeed make a large distinction between the sport on the SCA tourney field, a duel of honor, and an outright street brawl.


P.S. Nice resume http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sounds like fun. Am i right in saying that its full contact historical recreations or have i got the wrong end of the stick?


Originally posted by Worf101: 53 years in the school of McFilthy and McNasty.
3.5 year in Uncle Sam's U.S. Army finishing school.
7 plus years of down and dirty wrasslin' with my boy. His favorite lament:

"Why don't you fight fair you fat basterd!!!"

This is usually after I've twisted or bitten some sensitive bit or forced him to tap out lest he lose a limb. My typical respnse is:

"I've never seen a fair in my life, scoreboard beyatch!!!!"

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif


Originally posted by LEBillfish: Does swinging a mean iron skillet count as a martial art?

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif


@ Brando

Fascinating stuff there, thanks for sharing.

'Speak softly and carry a big stick'

Skunk_438RCAF
07-28-2010, 04:13 PM
Shotokan Karate since a teenager, and I did a semester's worth of Judo while in college. It was offered as a Phys.Ed. class. It's great exercise, it keeps you fit and flexible.

Karate I enjoy for the kata, and the perfection and concentration they require to perform them. The sparring I think I would enjoy more if they allowed us to wear some protective equipment and do some more "full contact" stuff. But thats all different from one club to another. The club I frequent has several instructors, to break up monotony and some of them prefer to teach hands on self-defense stuff, but you have to stay "after class" to get to learn it.

Stylized Karate can be a lot of fun, but they are anal about form and stuff that wont work in a street fight. It all depends on what you want to learn really.

Judo I really enjoyed because it has to be learned in a 1-on-1 sparring type scenario. You cannot do Judo on your own. So if you want to practice at home, unless your significant other will let you, you're stuck with only doing it in class.

Urufu_Shinjiro
07-29-2010, 06:42 PM
Originally posted by b2spirita:
Sounds like fun. Am i right in saying that its full contact historical recreations or have i got the wrong end of the stick?

Well, yes and no. In SCA fencing it is full speed full on sword fight, but you develop a light touch (which actually helps with point control), we're not out to hurt each other, and being a non-profit there is a certain amount of "safety first" that at times may be excessive. Now the SCA heavy fighting where they dress in real armor and fight with stout rattan sticks, that is full contact, still, no grappling or kicking and the like. As with any martial art that has competitions it's hard to avoid a certain amout of "sport" creeping in, but as the focus is historical accuracy we try to balance the two. My fencing instructor though makes no bones about the difference between "fencing" and a sword fight, emphasis on the "fight", lol. That and he was rather fond of the saying "Old age and treachery beat youth and vigor every time", lol! In fact there have been several times at a tournament that the opponent of either my wife or me has asked after the match "Do you study with Don Cullen?" having witnessed one sneaky parry or another, lol.

Wildnoob
07-30-2010, 11:43 AM
One year of Kyokushin Karate.

Unfortenetely I've stoped at already three years, but gonna return soon. Can't wait. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Osu!

b2spirita
07-31-2010, 12:43 PM
Originally posted by Urufu_Shinjiro:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by b2spirita:
Sounds like fun. Am i right in saying that its full contact historical recreations or have i got the wrong end of the stick?

Well, yes and no. In SCA fencing it is full speed full on sword fight, but you develop a light touch (which actually helps with point control), we're not out to hurt each other, and being a non-profit there is a certain amount of "safety first" that at times may be excessive. Now the SCA heavy fighting where they dress in real armor and fight with stout rattan sticks, that is full contact, still, no grappling or kicking and the like. As with any martial art that has competitions it's hard to avoid a certain amout of "sport" creeping in, but as the focus is historical accuracy we try to balance the two. My fencing instructor though makes no bones about the difference between "fencing" and a sword fight, emphasis on the "fight", lol. That and he was rather fond of the saying "Old age and treachery beat youth and vigor every time", lol! In fact there have been several times at a tournament that the opponent of either my wife or me has asked after the match "Do you study with Don Cullen?" having witnessed one sneaky parry or another, lol. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sounds awesome fun!

Fully agree about the treachery bit too?

@ Wild noob: Karate? Surely your too nice to be going around chopping people! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Pirschjaeger
08-02-2010, 11:37 PM
In Canada I took S h i t o-Ryu (idiotic censership) karate. It's close to Shoto-kan but more aggressive with more focus on fighting. Stances are tighter.

Years later I took Judo but it ended when I broke both my shoulder and collarbone in one move. We were practicing falls the morning after heavy partying.

Next was Ju-Jitsu in Beijing. That was fun and probably my favorite. You fought in every class, right from the beginning. My instructor was a student of Hoyce Gracie.

I'm now considering Tae kwon do (sp?).

Martial arts are fun and a great way to relieve stress. I think it's good for anyone and I highly recommend it to anyone of any age. Have fun and use it for personal physical and mental development and you'll get the most of it.

b2spirita
08-03-2010, 12:14 PM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
In Canada I took S h i t o-Ryu (idiotic censership) karate. It's close to Shoto-kan but more aggressive with more focus on fighting. Stances are tighter.

Years later I took Judo but it ended when I broke both my shoulder and collarbone in one move. We were practicing falls the morning after heavy partying.

Next was Ju-Jitsu in Beijing. That was fun and probably my favorite. You fought in every class, right from the beginning. My instructor was a student of Hoyce Gracie.

I'm now considering Tae kwon do (sp?).

Martial arts are fun and a great way to relieve stress. I think it's good for anyone and I highly recommend it to anyone of any age. Have fun and use it for personal physical and mental development and you'll get the most of it.


Hoyce Gracie? Wow!

Ive been looking around a bit more and im torn between going to the judo class and the ju jitsu class. I think ill go to both and see what i enjoy the most. Ju Jitsu strikes me as being a bit more flexible but i think im best suited to judo physically.

Ether way id better learn one, since the other day my brother elected to take my jesting comment of 'ill go out if you can tap me' a little too seriously.

Jokes on him tho, i didn't tap..... Course i was unconscious, but thats a technicality.....

Treetop64
08-06-2010, 10:55 AM
Studied Tae Kwon Do for four years. I still remember and practice the forms. Probably one of the least practical fighting arts for the real world, but it's a great workout.