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blakduk
05-30-2009, 05:12 PM
I've just noticed a video of a FW190 full scale replica having a test flight.
FW 190 test (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1iY2oQTbaM)

Two things strike me- the first is the sound of the engine. It sounds very agricultural like all other radials i've heard.
The second is- check out the position of the pilots head. He's practically pushing the canopy off! That must be a very uncomfortable ride.
It also shows how deceptively small the 190 was- for some reason it always seemed slightly larger than 109's and Spits to me.

zxwings
05-30-2009, 09:52 PM
Difference between the size of the FW190A and that of the Bf109 is negligible, in fact. And these two aircraft are larger than the La5 by about half a meter, but smaller than the Spitfire also by approximately half a metre. So, whereas the La may look a bit small, the FW190 is not a small aircraft at all in front of the Spitfire.

Skycat_2
05-31-2009, 01:51 AM
I think that in that video the pilot's crash helmet makes him look larger in the cockpit than what you see in vintage images.

Manu-6S
05-31-2009, 02:29 AM
It's not flying but I still love to hear this... an original one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...S1T8&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Y5LBUVS1T8&feature=related)

dadada1
06-01-2009, 01:56 PM
I have mixed feelings about Yellow 10. It would be truly amazing to see it in the air again but the loss would be tragic if it crashed. That video is after the first rebuild I think, it wasn't up to full flying condition at this time.

WholeHawg
06-01-2009, 01:56 PM
He does look a bit jammed up in there but it hard to tell for sure. Like skycat said his helmet by be creating optical illusion and the fact that its white and stands out probably increases the effect.

It sure would be nice to have the kind of resources it would take to get into a project like this.

Buzzsaw-
06-01-2009, 08:48 PM
Originally posted by blakduk:
Two things strike me- the first is the sound of the engine. It sounds very agricultural like all other radials i've heard.

You may not be aware, but this replica is not powered by a BMW 801, but instead by a Russian built radial, a descendant of the engine which powered the Lavochkin La-5/7's. Perhaps that has something to do with the sound?

The size of the FW-190 is a function of its design intent.

At this time the most successful fighters were relatively low wing loaded aircraft, which were designed to turn well at lower speeds. Less so for the 109 than the Spitfire, but even the 109 had its concessions to lift, with the wingslats which improved low speed handling.

But by the time the FW-190 hit the drawing board, both German and American aeronautics designers were moving in a different direction. The emphasis was now being placed on greater speed. A larger wing creates more drag, so Tank's decision was to go with a smaller wing, with much higher than previously standard wingloading. The Spit V had a wingloading of approx. 27 lbs per Sq/ft, the 109F had a wingloading of approx. 34 lbs per Sq/ft. (plus it had the slats) Contrast that with early models of the 190, which had a wingloading of 41 lbs per Sq/ft. In fact Tank's original design had an even smaller wing, but when the engine choice was moved to the BMW-801, more wing area was needed for the balance of the design.

Instead of good low speed turnrate, the emphasis was on speed, and lateral maneuverability, especially at higher speeds.

If the 190 had followed the trend up to that time, it would have had a much larger wing, and hence reduced speed, and reduced lateral maneuverability.

The FW-190 was the first of a new breed of Fighter aircraft, which had a different raison d'etre. That is why perhaps it arrived with such a bang on the European scene in late 1941. It didn't fit the template other fighters had followed.

Coincidentally, the Americans were also thinking in this same direction, the USAAF laid out some guidelines for aircraft design in the early '40's which changed the emphasis from turn capability to speed and lateral maneuverability. Hence their later designs, such as the P-47, P-51 and F4U-1, very fast, highly wingloaded aircraft compared to previous designs.

Of course this became the dominant trend in WWII, pointing inexorably towards the Jet age.

blakduk
06-02-2009, 02:52 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Buzzsaw-:

You may not be aware, but this replica is not powered by a BMW 801, but instead by a Russian built radial, a descendant of the engine which powered the Lavochkin La-5/7's. Perhaps that has something to do with the sound?

[QUOTE]

That makes a lot of sense- it does sound uncannily like a Yak82 i had the privilege of riding in.
Your comments about the design philosophy behind the 190 make a lot of sense. The allies had a great deal of trouble coming to terms with it when it first appeared. They were extremely fortunate to get their hands on the one that mistakenly landed on a British airfield.