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jugent
11-07-2005, 05:12 PM
The yaw is indicated by the inclinometer(a metall-ball inside a glass-tube). If you arent flying straight (your a/c isnt perfect lined up compared to your flightpath, the inclinometer indicates yaw.

Compare it as if you are towing a boat in a wire and the wire isnt connect perfectly to the boats centrum-line, the boat will yaw in the water. If you sit in the boat and look dead ahead the front-center of the boat will not be exactly in your course.
But if your head is fixed in the front direction, you will look to the side of the course.
The yaw will make the towing heavier.

If the towing-wire is connected perfectly to the centerline (bow or stearn?)there is no yaw, and your path is straight.

In real-life your plane yaws when you use the ailerons because of difference in drag between your wings.

When you use the elevator the torque? makes your aircraft yaw.

When you sit in your cockpit and looks through your sight and the inclinometer indicates yaw, you dont observe by the sight that your aircraft isnt travelling straight trough the air.

This can perhaps be corrected as you instinctly moves your body to compensate.

If you fire the tracers moves according to the sight, as it should do because the guns are fixed.

But your head isnt, either should you observe that you a/c isnt flying straight, as for the fixed head, or the tracers shouldnt line up by the sight as if you compensate the yaw and look beside the centerline of the aircraft.

To step on your ball is a frase that the flight instructor tells you when you arnt flying straight. The frase means use the rudder to correct the yaw.

Too complicated?
Write a line and ask.

Lemky
11-07-2005, 07:07 PM
Why not roll the ball

Curtiss_P-6E
11-07-2005, 07:23 PM
The next time you are in a heated dogfight, watch what the "ball" is doing and guess where the con just disapeard to. In the F4U while pulling some Gs, you cant see the "ball" in normal view. In the F4U, normal view for me is all the way back. Any "zoom in" is out of the question....if you want to keep an eye on the "con".

han freak solo
11-07-2005, 09:01 PM
Originally posted by jugent:
To step on your ball


My legs are extraordinarily short, so this phrase makes me wince.

I actually like "step on the ball" better. It sounds less painful.

Owlsphone
11-07-2005, 09:18 PM
Originally posted by Lemky:
Why not roll the ball

The phrase comes from the fact that if the ball is to the right you need right rudder to correct, and therefore step on the right rudder pedal with your right foot. It's like youre trying to step on the ball. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

diomedes33
11-08-2005, 06:03 AM
Originally posted by Curtiss_P-6E:
The next time you are in a heated dogfight, watch what the "ball" is doing and guess where the con just disapeard to. In the F4U while pulling some Gs, you cant see the "ball" in normal view. In the F4U, normal view for me is all the way back. Any "zoom in" is out of the question....if you want to keep an eye on the "con".

You can use the gunsight as an inclinometer also. Whenever there's any sideslip, the reticle will float to one side or the other. Not the most accurate thing in the world, but it'll get you in the neighborhood.

stathem
11-08-2005, 08:09 AM
At work we have a phrase, "foot on ball". It means to slow the job down.

No relevance to the thread, it's a football (soccer) term.

jugent
11-08-2005, 12:24 PM
By the way how does the slip-indicator for german aircraft works?
What forces influence the ball so that it can indicate yaw?

Tully__
11-08-2005, 06:20 PM
Originally posted by jugent:
By the way how does the slip-indicator for german aircraft works?
What forces influence the ball so that it can indicate yaw? German aircraft have the same "ball in a tube" slip indicator as the American aircraft. Some of the British & Russian aircraft have a needle type indicator.

They all work pretty much the same way. When you're not lined up, the aircraft is performing a very gentle turn and the ball/needle swings to the outside of the turn (direction of slip). You have to apply rudder in that direction to correct the slip.

effte
11-09-2005, 02:26 PM
And now, the big trick question: Name one case where you can be flying absolutely straight and not have the ball centered? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

TX-EcoDragon
11-09-2005, 05:16 PM
Originally posted by effte:
And now, the big trick question: Name one case where you can be flying absolutely straight and not have the ball centered? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Straight, level, and inverted is one such example.

Jungmann
11-09-2005, 08:27 PM
Kick the ball in the a**. What my CFI used to say. Sticks in the memory.

Cheers,

effte
11-10-2005, 01:39 PM
Originally posted by TX-EcoDragon:
Straight, level, and inverted is one such example.

LOL!

Special version for aerobatic pilots: Give one condition in which the ball in the libelle for the current regime of flight can stay off center without while flying straight?