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Bewolf
04-10-2007, 09:27 AM
So I today stumbled over an article of what happend to the Focke Wulf Company after the war. That made me curious to the fate of other known WW2 aircraft companies like Vought, Grumman, Bristol, Supermarine etc., all of whom one doesn't hear much anymore.

Here is what I found out about Fockke Wulf:

As part of Germany's military-industrial machine, Focke-Wulf was not allowed to continue production for several years at the end of the war. Kurt Tank, like many other German technicians, continued his professional life in Latin America. The Argentine Government offered him a job at its aerotechnical institute, the Instituto Aerotécnico in Córdoba. He moved there, with many of his Focke-Wulf co-workers, in 1947.

The Instituto Aerotécnico later became Argentina's military aeroplane factory, the Fábrica Militar de Aviones. It employed the Focke-Wulf men until President Juan Peron fell from power in 1955; then they dispersed, many to the United States, and Tank to work on supersonic aircraft in India.

Restricted plane production was permitted again in Germany in 1951, and Focke-Wulf began to make gliders. Production of motorised planes began again in 1955, with the manufacture of trainer aircraft for the post-war German military.

Focke-Wulf managed to win $27 million in compensation in the 1960s for damage inflicted on its share of the Focke-Wulf plant by Allied bombs during the war. ref

In 1961, Focke-Wulf, Weserflug and Hamburger Flugzeugbau joined forces in the Entwicklungsring Nord (ERNO) to develop rockets. Focke-Wulf formally merged with Weserflug in 1964, becoming Vereinigte Flugtechnische Werke (VFW).

Vereinigte Flugtechnische Werke (VFW) was a German aerospace company formed by the 1964 merger of Focke-Wulf and Weserflug. The VFW can be said to have been a natural outcome of the 1961 rocket technology development alliance between the two merger partners and Hamburger Flugzeugbau in the Entwicklungsring Nord (ERNO) group.

In 1981, VFW was taken over by Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm (MBB), which in its turn was taken over in 1989 by DASA. Afterwards, the ERNO / VFW descendant was active as the space infrastructure division of Astrium contributing parts to the European Ariane space booster system and the International Space Station. In June 2003, this unit became part of EADS SPACE Transportation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Focke_Wulf
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vereinigte_Flugtechnische_Werke

So, from gliders to space. Not too bad!

Bewolf
04-10-2007, 09:27 AM
So I today stumbled over an article of what happend to the Focke Wulf Company after the war. That made me curious to the fate of other known WW2 aircraft companies like Vought, Grumman, Bristol, Supermarine etc., all of whom one doesn't hear much anymore.

Here is what I found out about Fockke Wulf:

As part of Germany's military-industrial machine, Focke-Wulf was not allowed to continue production for several years at the end of the war. Kurt Tank, like many other German technicians, continued his professional life in Latin America. The Argentine Government offered him a job at its aerotechnical institute, the Instituto Aerotécnico in Córdoba. He moved there, with many of his Focke-Wulf co-workers, in 1947.

The Instituto Aerotécnico later became Argentina's military aeroplane factory, the Fábrica Militar de Aviones. It employed the Focke-Wulf men until President Juan Peron fell from power in 1955; then they dispersed, many to the United States, and Tank to work on supersonic aircraft in India.

Restricted plane production was permitted again in Germany in 1951, and Focke-Wulf began to make gliders. Production of motorised planes began again in 1955, with the manufacture of trainer aircraft for the post-war German military.

Focke-Wulf managed to win $27 million in compensation in the 1960s for damage inflicted on its share of the Focke-Wulf plant by Allied bombs during the war. ref

In 1961, Focke-Wulf, Weserflug and Hamburger Flugzeugbau joined forces in the Entwicklungsring Nord (ERNO) to develop rockets. Focke-Wulf formally merged with Weserflug in 1964, becoming Vereinigte Flugtechnische Werke (VFW).

Vereinigte Flugtechnische Werke (VFW) was a German aerospace company formed by the 1964 merger of Focke-Wulf and Weserflug. The VFW can be said to have been a natural outcome of the 1961 rocket technology development alliance between the two merger partners and Hamburger Flugzeugbau in the Entwicklungsring Nord (ERNO) group.

In 1981, VFW was taken over by Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm (MBB), which in its turn was taken over in 1989 by DASA. Afterwards, the ERNO / VFW descendant was active as the space infrastructure division of Astrium contributing parts to the European Ariane space booster system and the International Space Station. In June 2003, this unit became part of EADS SPACE Transportation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Focke_Wulf
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vereinigte_Flugtechnische_Werke

So, from gliders to space. Not too bad!

alexc650
04-10-2007, 09:36 AM
Nakajima has evolved into Fuji heavy industries, aka, Subaru.


Alex

FrenziedAU
04-10-2007, 09:43 AM
Grumman made at least the F-14, so up until recently they were doing well.

berg417448
04-10-2007, 09:46 AM
Grumman still exists as part of the Northrop-Grumman corporation.
http://www.northropgrumman.com/

Vought still exists as Vought Aircraft Industries.
http://www.voughtaircraft.com/

XyZspineZyX
04-10-2007, 09:55 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by FrenziedAU:
Grumman made at least the F-14, so up until recently they were doing well. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Grumman became Grumman Aerospace and then sold it's Grumman American division to Gulfstream. In the mid 90's they merged with Northrop to become Northrop Grumman Corporation

North American Aviation was started in the mid-20s if I recall, to bascically broker deals with airlines. General Motors became their controlling interest a while later, and after some problems with the Space Program, they merged with Rockwell. In the later part of the '90s, Rockwell was bought by Boeing

LW_Swordfish
04-10-2007, 09:57 AM
The Bristol Aeroplane Company (formerly British and Colonial Aeroplane Company) was a major British aircraft company which, in 1959, merged its aircraft building interests with several major British aircraft companies to form the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC). BAC in turn became later part of British Aerospace, now BAE Systems.

LW_Swordfish
04-10-2007, 10:02 AM
In 1928 Vickers-Armstrongs took over Supermarine as Supermarine Aviation Works (Vickers), Ltd and in 1938 all Vickers-Armstrongs aviation interests were reorganised to become Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd, although Supermarine continued to design, build and trade under its own name.

The first Supermarine landplane design to go into production was the famous and successful Spitfire. The earlier Hawker Hurricane and the Spitfire were the mainstay of RAF Fighter Command fighter aircraft which fought off the Luftwaffe bombing raids with fighter escorts during the Battle of Britain in the summer of 1940. While the Hurricane was available in larger numbers and consequently played a larger role, the new Spitfire caught the popular imagination and became the aircraft associated with the battle.

Other well-known planes from World War II were the Seafire (a naval version of the Spitfire). Supermarine also developed the Spiteful/Seafang the successor of the Spitfire/Seafire and the Walrus flying boat.

The Supermarine main works was in Woolston, Southampton which led to the city being heavily bombed in 1940.

The last of the Supermarine aircraft was the Supermarine Scimitar. After that, in the shakeup of British aircraft manufacturing, Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) became a part of the British Aircraft Corporation and the individual manufacturing heritage names were lost. Northshore Marine builds a range of motorboats under the Supermarine name in Chichester.



Both Post are Extracts from wikipedia.

leitmotiv
04-10-2007, 10:39 AM
Heh, heh, that ain't half of it. Because American companies were part owners of Focke Wulf, they received compensation from the U.S. government for damage inflicted on FW factories by American bombers during the war (Nothing new to this: in WWI the British punctually paid royalties to a German company for the use of a patented fuze they used on their artillery shells.).

Waldo.Pepper
04-10-2007, 11:41 AM
Avro. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif

WWSpinDry
04-10-2007, 11:55 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
Grumman still exists as part of the Northrop-Grumman corporation. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
I should certainly hope so! They sign my paychecks. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

Rickustyit
04-10-2007, 01:22 PM
Aeronautica Macchi (http://www.aermacchi.it/index.htm)

Still producing airplanes.

Rick

Bewolf
04-11-2007, 02:20 AM
Neat infos here! What astonishes me is that Britain and Germany obviously shared a pretty similiar fate in their aircraft manufacturers. In that in both countries the companies over time merged. In Britain the outcome was BAe, in Germany DASA.

Plelv44_Mangrov
04-11-2007, 02:39 AM
Finland:

Ilmavoimien lentokonetehdas (1921 - 1928)
Valtion lentokonetehdas (1928 - 1945)
Valtion Metallitehtaat (1945 - 1952)
Valmet Lentokoneteollisuus (1952 - 1996)
Patria Aviation (1996 - )

leitmotiv
04-11-2007, 06:35 AM
The big difference between the inter-war period and the post-WWII period was that in the former period the govts in Europe tried to keep as many of the aero firms in business as possible by carefully distributing orders around. In the latter, the govts said combine or die---thus, they destroyed technical competition. Then they urged the creation of trans-national super-bureaus. The Europeans far exceeded the Soviets in centralization and the killing of competition. Funny old world. Had it not been for the U.S., innovation in aviation in the West would have almost died. Of course, if the U.S. had been stagnant, the Europeans would have had to compensate.

WOLFMondo
04-11-2007, 06:55 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Waldo.Pepper:
Avro. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

There all BAe now. Avro, Hawker, Dehavilland...at least Rolls Royce is still in the same hands.

Bewolf
04-11-2007, 06:57 AM
Rolls Royce belongs to BMW nowadays, funnily enough.

leitmotiv
04-11-2007, 08:01 AM
I knew a lawyer in London, female, who hated everything German---yet she drove a BMW! I went to the RAF Museum and took a close-up of the blue-and-white BMW plate on a Ju 88R cowling, had the image framed, and gave it to her.

BerkshireHunt
04-11-2007, 08:13 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by leitmotiv:
The Europeans far exceeded the Soviets in centralization and the killing of competition. Funny old world. Had it not been for the U.S., innovation in aviation in the West would have almost died. Of course, if the U.S. had been stagnant, the Europeans would have had to compensate. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You forget the VTOL Hawker Harrier, the Concorde supersonic airliner, the world's biggest transport aircraft the Antonov 225, the world's biggest helicopter the Mil Mi 26 Halo and the Soviet Ekranoplans - none of which were developed in the United States.

Te_Vigo
04-11-2007, 09:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by leitmotiv:
Heh, heh, that ain't half of it. Because American companies were part owners of Focke Wulf, they received compensation from the U.S. government for damage inflicted on FW factories by American bombers during the war (Nothing new to this: in WWI the British punctually paid royalties to a German company for the use of a patented fuze they used on their artillery shells.). </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That's irony for ya

alexc650
04-11-2007, 09:58 AM
Another instance of weird royalties. the germans paid the British for rights to the machine guns, dont remember which ones though, but it was the common one the germans used during WWI with great effect.


Alex

Fox_3
04-11-2007, 01:03 PM
Boulton and Paul now make windows, staircases, doors, and fitted kitchens!

BaldieJr
04-11-2007, 01:09 PM
BaldieJr now sells insurance under Rocko Corp, which was formed when members of the Gambino family discovered cornbread.

ploughman
04-11-2007, 01:15 PM
Shorts of Belfast are still kicking around aren't they? Last thing I remember them making was HVM laser riding SAMs.

F19_tintin
04-11-2007, 02:22 PM
alexc650 Did you mean The Maxim Machine-Gun?

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWmaximgun.htm

Spectre1968
04-11-2007, 03:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Fox_3:
Boulton and Paul now make windows, staircases, doors, and fitted kitchens! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
Not Quite

In 1961 Boulton Paul joined the Dowty Group to become solely an aircraft component manufacturer. Today it is a part of the even larger TI group.