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View Full Version : Supercharger operation: I wish this was modeled.



Waldo.Pepper
03-02-2005, 10:00 PM
A youngster called Harris from 1830 Squadron was flying high -about 23,000 feet----Over Brunswick town at noon. He was tearing along at high speed with full supercharger going. (This was a small turbine of bewilderingly high revolutions positioned at the rear of the power unit, which at high altitude forced the petrol/air mixture into the engine under very high pressure.)

Quite suddenly the engine packed in through failure of the ignition system. (Both magnetos were pressurized for high-altitude flying, but at this stage the pressurization system wasn't yet perfected.) Harris glided down to around 16,000 feet, a height at which the magnetos decided to recommence operating and the engine cut in again.

The boy had already committed himself to a searing and explosive death. At this moment he had split seconds to live. When the engine cut out, he had obviously forgotten to withdraw the supercharger. Now, as the engine, from inertia, burst into life again at a high throttle setting, the thrust exerted on the bearings of the supercharger was too much. The rear of the power unit completely destroyed itself, with hardened steel tearing through fuselage, cockpit, wings-and Harris.

Down in Brunswick it was lunchtime and the main street was as busy as a bee. In the centre of the roadway stood a policeman controlling a school crossing. He looked upwards, perplexed by a strange whining. With commendable alacrity he leapt back a couple of paces as a Pratt and Whitney engine, weighing around two tons, hurtled down from a bright blue sky to bury itself in the tarmac in front of him. Nobody was hurt, but the Corsair was scattered far and wide and the young pilot had virtually disappeared.

Waldo.Pepper
03-02-2005, 10:00 PM
A youngster called Harris from 1830 Squadron was flying high -about 23,000 feet----Over Brunswick town at noon. He was tearing along at high speed with full supercharger going. (This was a small turbine of bewilderingly high revolutions positioned at the rear of the power unit, which at high altitude forced the petrol/air mixture into the engine under very high pressure.)

Quite suddenly the engine packed in through failure of the ignition system. (Both magnetos were pressurized for high-altitude flying, but at this stage the pressurization system wasn't yet perfected.) Harris glided down to around 16,000 feet, a height at which the magnetos decided to recommence operating and the engine cut in again.

The boy had already committed himself to a searing and explosive death. At this moment he had split seconds to live. When the engine cut out, he had obviously forgotten to withdraw the supercharger. Now, as the engine, from inertia, burst into life again at a high throttle setting, the thrust exerted on the bearings of the supercharger was too much. The rear of the power unit completely destroyed itself, with hardened steel tearing through fuselage, cockpit, wings-and Harris.

Down in Brunswick it was lunchtime and the main street was as busy as a bee. In the centre of the roadway stood a policeman controlling a school crossing. He looked upwards, perplexed by a strange whining. With commendable alacrity he leapt back a couple of paces as a Pratt and Whitney engine, weighing around two tons, hurtled down from a bright blue sky to bury itself in the tarmac in front of him. Nobody was hurt, but the Corsair was scattered far and wide and the young pilot had virtually disappeared.

p1ngu666
03-02-2005, 10:47 PM
scary http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

alot of ppl where lost in non combat flying http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

VW-IceFire
03-02-2005, 10:58 PM
These are the sorts of things that its difficult to implement and need to be weighed into account for the accessibility of even the grizzled veteran of a sim pilot.

I'm not sure if I want to deal with all of these things. I'd die alot more http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Finkeren
03-03-2005, 12:48 AM
Maybe this is already modelled in the game.
‚¬®Sure would serve as a reasonable explanation for the incidents of P-51s blowing up while pulling out of a steep dive http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Finkeren
03-03-2005, 12:49 AM
Maybe this is already modelled in the game.
‚¬®Sure would serve as a reasonable explanation for the incidents of P-51s blowing up while pulling out of a steep dive http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif
So dear P-51 whiners: Stop complaining, it's really just realism

Akronnick
03-03-2005, 03:05 AM
Think about this the next time you crash because of an ill-timed network lag spike.

JG53Frankyboy
03-03-2005, 05:41 AM
well, you even dont damage your engine if you are running the highblower at low altitude http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

and i doubt that you need less fuel in game if you are operating the low blower at high altitude as the same powersettings as with highblower . but , sure i have not testet that http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

darkhorizon11
03-03-2005, 12:42 PM
Yeah too bad equipment malfunctions aren't modeled in the game. Well unless their shot up. Today we have turbochargers with a wastegate and many have an automatic pressure relief vavle to prevent this from happening.

EnGaurde
03-04-2005, 12:51 AM
my question is, why ddnt said pilot reduce manifold pressure, turn off the engine, feather the prop and glide till it was time to exit? (replace that procedure with the real one a real pilot would have used)

did he kill himself, or was he killed?

hmmm.

Codex1971
03-04-2005, 04:51 AM
Engine damage is modelled...

Take a BF-109G6/AS @ 1000m, throttle up to 110% and see what happens when you engage WEP.