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wayno7777
03-13-2006, 09:29 PM
A couple of weeks ago I made a delivery to Livingston HS in New Jersey. Somehow I got talking with the lady about WWII and she said she had a book written by a friend of hers and his father about the B-26 Marauder. She said if she could find it she would send it to me. To make a long story short, it came in the mail today. I was pleasantly surprised. It's signed by Carlton R. Rehr and his father, Louis S. Rehr, who flew the Marauder in WWII. It's called Marauder: A memoir of a B-26 pilot in Europe in World War II. ISBN 0-7864-1664-5. The dedication reads as follows; To those whose efforts have kept alive the heroism, sacrifices and spirit of the Marauder Men and their aircraft. Their work stands as a perpetual reminder of the role of these men and their beloved bombers played in liberating the world from tyranny.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/Stuff/Marauderbook.jpg

wayno7777
03-13-2006, 09:29 PM
A couple of weeks ago I made a delivery to Livingston HS in New Jersey. Somehow I got talking with the lady about WWII and she said she had a book written by a friend of hers and his father about the B-26 Marauder. She said if she could find it she would send it to me. To make a long story short, it came in the mail today. I was pleasantly surprised. It's signed by Carlton R. Rehr and his father, Louis S. Rehr, who flew the Marauder in WWII. It's called Marauder: A memoir of a B-26 pilot in Europe in World War II. ISBN 0-7864-1664-5. The dedication reads as follows; To those whose efforts have kept alive the heroism, sacrifices and spirit of the Marauder Men and their aircraft. Their work stands as a perpetual reminder of the role of these men and their beloved bombers played in liberating the world from tyranny.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/Stuff/Marauderbook.jpg

Enforcer572005
03-13-2006, 09:44 PM
id be interested in a cliff notes run down if you get a chance. Not many works about the B26.

Here's a shot i made at the 89 Harlingen CAF airshow. This machine was sadly destroyed in a fatal crash a few yrs ago. It was a later model. Kermit weeks has an early B or C model at his museum in Fla that is flyable.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/Scan399.jpg

this is one of the flyby photo passes they would make at speed. This was always a highlight of thier airshows. they would come screaming in low and fast, several times, giving great shots like this. B-26s were incredible machines.
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b63/Enforcer572005/Scan400.jpg

wayno7777
03-13-2006, 10:05 PM
Check out this site....
http://320thbg.org/photoaircraft.html

Daiichidoku
03-13-2006, 10:25 PM
great site, Wayno! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif


growing up, reading all I could about any and all military aviation, I recall seeing pics of Marauders, more often than not, in rather stressfull situations...which I always thought of as ironic, considering Magruder's Marauder (or 'the flying prostitute') had one of, if not, the very best combat loss records (or is that ratios?) among bombers in ETO


I think everyoe has seen this pic....but still worth posting anyhow (RIP crew)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/Daiichidoku/B26-flak.jpg

wayno7777
03-13-2006, 10:28 PM
Most of the photos in the book have lots of flak bursts in them....

ps. some more sites....
http://www.publicenquiry.co.uk/squads/bs456th.html
http://www.b26.com/index.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_units_using_the_B-..._during_World_War_II (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_units_using_the_B-26_Marauder_during_World_War_II)
http://www.billsb-26marauder.org/

wayno7777
03-13-2006, 10:48 PM
I found a pic of Louis S. Rehr....
http://www.b26.com/page/456/21.htm

msalama
03-13-2006, 11:18 PM
Cool http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

I for one would love to see a flyable B-26 in the game. Won't get it, though, most likely http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

But what's the real story? The AC was called a Widowmaker for a reason, because IIRC it was very accident-prone in the beginning. It had a high wingloading, and because of that a high landing speed which some crews just didn't understand... But later on in the war it became one of the SAFEST light bomber AC according to the statistics, so what on Earth happened? Did Martin modify its construction somehow, or were the ops / procedures changed into something more suitable for the type?

wayno7777
03-13-2006, 11:33 PM
IIRC they made the wings longer. I wish I could find this video of a pilot flying the Marauder around like Tony Levier did the P-38. Single engine stuff and all....

msalama
03-14-2006, 12:58 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">IIRC they made the wings longer. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

OK, thx Wayno. Yeah, that would explain it...

Enforcer572005
03-14-2006, 08:00 AM
the early models were highly thought of in the pacific in the early days of hte war...the crews learned how to fly them and they thought they were the best thing going. the "one a day in tampa bay" syndrome in the states was due to the facts mentioned above, but once the pilots got to know them, they were very effective.

Changing the design made them easier to fly, but also cut the performance a bit. Kermit Weeks plane is a very early model that bellied in alaska in 42 and was recovered some yrs ago alon wiht several ohters at the same site.

telsono
03-14-2006, 12:36 PM
At the height of the training problems with the B-26 in Florida, Jimmy Doolittle was sent down by the Pentagon to investigate it. At the base he asked to take an aircraft up. He had never flown a Marauder before and had someone show him where each instrument was. All of the pilots and cadets on the base just lined the field to watch. The take-off went off without a hitch and he tried various manuevers with it again without any problems. Then he flew low over the field, feathered one engine did and roll and landed on one engine. Jaws were dragging all along the tarmac, none of these pilots or cadets had ever seen that aircraft handled in that fashion. Jimmy Doolittle came out of the aircraft and just commented that he didn't see any problems with it.
In the Pacific they were withdrawn in favor to the B-25 because of the high landing speeds, longer landing runs and the need for paved runways. The B-25 was more forgiving in this regard. One note, Pres. Lyndon Johnson received a Silver Star while assigned to a B-26 unit in the Pacific. If anyone has more information on that, that would be interesting.
In the ETO/MTO this aircraft came to its own. The wing lengthening helped with some handling properties. One aircraft "Flak Bait" had the highest number of missions flown in the ETO of any bomber aircraft in the USAAC, 202! Its nose rests in the NASM. Other Marauders finished with more than 100 missions each.

FI_Willie
03-14-2006, 01:43 PM
It's an interesting book. You can tell he wasn't much of author though. Good read with a lot of non MARUADER BS in it. The book also has some very interesting insight to how things actually were for the "medium" bombers and their crews in WWII.
http://www.glop.org/starforce/boycott-starforce-mario-userbar.jpg (http://www.glop.org/starforce/)

msalama
03-14-2006, 01:44 PM
Thx again gents, interesting stories / information all around. S!

FI_Willie
03-14-2006, 01:49 PM
It was also referred to as the "Baltimore *****". Reason being when the old timers looked at the short, thin wing, they decided that it had no visible means of support. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
http://www.glop.org/starforce/boycott-starforce-mario-userbar.jpg (http://www.glop.org/starforce/)

Grey_Mouser67
03-14-2006, 08:34 PM
The early versions had shorter wings, higher wingloading and were very unforgiving on landing due to high speed....later versions had wings lengthened and helped, but it was still tricky to fly them.''


The Marauders greatest redeeming qualities were that it was fast and it was particularly tough...much more so than the Mitchell. The Marauder was to the Mitchell what the Flying Fortress was to the Liberator.

All successful bombers, but in terms of toughness and survivability, there were not any better aircraft to be in than a Hellcat, Jug, B17 or Marauder...best in class bar none.

I have a 1:48 diecast Marauder "Flak Bait" sitting next to my computer...I just love that bird even though I'm not a big bomber afficianado.

FI_Willie
03-14-2006, 08:46 PM
Funny story about a 26 tailgunner. This guy was one of my school mate's father. He was a head case. (Still is)LOL.

He was a C.O, or conscientous objector in WWII. That didn't earn him a lot of friends. He was always worried about getting his butt shot off on a mission.

One day he decided to line the tailgunner's area with all the flak jackets he could scrounge. He had the plane's CG so far aft they nearly crashed on take off! The skipper of the bird kicked him off his crew and his stunt earned him KP duty until the end of the war..

berg417448
03-14-2006, 09:03 PM
I had a neighbor who was a B-26 pilot in WWII. He flew the ones that had the 4 guns firing forward on the sides of the fusilage. One story I remember him telling was about seeing an Me-109 diving in front of his plane. he saw that the 109 was going to pass directly in front of his bomber so he pressed the gun button and the 109 flew through a stream of gunfire. He never saw what happend to it...just continued down until it was out of his sight.


Another guy in my hometown was a waist gunner on a B-26. One mission they we flying just above a cloud layer. He saw a bubble canopy poke up from beneath the cloud close by...he thought it was a P-47 at first. Then he realized that it was a Me-262! About the time he was swinging his gun around the 262 pilot looked up, saw him and quickly pushed back into the cloud out of sight.

wayno7777
03-14-2006, 09:55 PM
The B-26 story is interesting.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/B-26US.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/B-26german.jpg

It wasn't a video, it was a pic and I found it. The guy who flew the demostration flights was none other than Vincent 'Squeak' Burnett. There is a story. No one knows how it came about, but Burnett apparently challenged Joe Foss to a dogfight at a conference near Galveston, TX in 1943. Pitting a medium bomber against a top-of-the-line fighter should have resulted in a very lopsided duel.Normally the outcome would have been apparent from the outset, but with Burnett flying his B-26 it was a different story. As the two aircraft (Foss was flying his F4U) tore through the Texas sky, Foss quickly discovered that his opponent was no ordinary pilot. Burnett reportedly maneuvered the B-26 more like a fighter than a bomber. When the match was over, it was declared a draw. Burnett later mantained that he offered to put his B-26 up against any comparable aircraft, and that no one could take him on.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/B26Baltimore1943.jpg
The full article on Squeak Burnett is in the January 2006 issue of Aviation History....

dravisar
03-15-2006, 01:44 AM
Wayno...thanks a bunch for the link...I took a look at the first 10 or so photos, but didnt read the captions..I assumed that they were all 1980's ish photos of restored AC, until I noticed it was all wartime! went through all em and loved em... great pics, thanks!

woofiedog
03-15-2006, 02:21 AM
Very Lucky that day indeed!
Excellent links also... I'll have to check these out better later on.

SnapdLikeAMutha
03-15-2006, 04:23 AM
wayno7777, that st'bd rear quarter shot is brilliant - displays the aircraft's clean lines to great effect.

Feathered_IV
03-15-2006, 04:50 AM
Some of the best wartime shots I've ever seen. Amazing http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif.

BlitzPig_DDT
03-15-2006, 08:02 AM
http://brianscache.com/unseen/tro-marauder.jpg


....couldn't resist. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

darkhorizon11
03-15-2006, 09:41 AM
I'm curious if he commented about the dangerous tendencies of the aircraft in slow speed flight.

The laminar airfoil much it much less user friendly during landing and when battle damaged compared to the Clark Y airfoil used on the B-17.

The B24 Liberator also had the same problems!

StellarRat
03-15-2006, 10:08 AM
The history of this plane after the war is very sad. Most of them were immediately scrapped whereever they were last based at and not brought back to the US. The B-26 is one of the rarest WW II planes. I believe only one or two are still flyable.

Bo_Nidle
03-15-2006, 10:20 AM
I had never seen a B-26 in the "flesh" so to speak, until I visited Kermit Weeks "Fantasy of Flight" in Florida in 2005.

I took pictures but it was hard to get a decent one as the aircraft are a little close together.

Anyway heres what I got. The side view is a composite of two pics of the nose and tail hence the distortion. http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/FoF4.jpg
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/B26Fof.jpg

All in all I thought it was a very sleek looking aircraft.

major_setback
03-15-2006, 11:39 AM
Lots of Photos from a link on Wikipedia:
http://afhra.maxwell.af.mil/wwwroot/photo_galleries/mer.../Aircraft_Photos.htm (http://afhra.maxwell.af.mil/wwwroot/photo_galleries/merhar/TOC/Aircraft_Photos.htm)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/8a/B-26_Development_Evolution.jpg


http://afhra.maxwell.af.mil/wwwroot/photo_galleries/merhar/Photos/01097628_035.jpg

msalama
03-15-2006, 01:29 PM
Very interesting - and high quality - photos. Thanks for the link. S!

ImpStarDuece
03-15-2006, 01:58 PM
I don't know if this story is true, but I've always liked it:

When the Marauder started arriving in England in early 1943 word got around that it was a "hot ship" to fly. USAAF crews were confident that it could outfly any other medium bomber, and weren't afraid to say so. Eventually, over drinks at a local pub, a B-26 crew challenged a Mosquito to a race.

The Mosuqito crew flew over to the USAAF airbase the next morning to take part in "recognition exercises". The race would start on the ground, fly to an agreed marker and then turn home and make a run back over the airbase. The two crews lined their planes up on the run way, and then took off at the signal. The Marauder screamed along the runway and took off first, stretching a handy lead out, the big R-2800 purring.

The B-26 piot then turned to the co-pilot to say something and his jaw dropped. There was the Mosquito, coming along beside them, inverted, with one prop feathered, with the crew waving politely as they cruised past http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif . needless to say, B-26 pilots were a little quieter about their birds when around Mossie pilots from that point on.

GreyBeast
03-15-2006, 02:35 PM
Right on, Deuce!

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

mortoma
03-15-2006, 06:03 PM
My father didn't serve in the war due to being color blind, but he taught gunners how to operate the top turret in the B-26 in Indianapolis. He did this at the Indiana State Fair grounds as it was temporarily converted into an airfield during the war years!!!!

wayno7777
03-15-2006, 10:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by StellarRat:
The history of this plane after the war is very sad. Most of them were immediately scrapped whereever they were last based at and not brought back to the US. The B-26 is one of the rarest WW II planes. I believe only one or two are still flyable. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Sadly that is true, but it seems that there are many excellent color wartime photos taken of the Marauder in flight and combat. Nice shots, B_N....

Beaufort-RAF
03-19-2006, 05:01 PM
39 Squadron Marauder Association (http://www.39thsquadronmarauders.org.uk/page37.html)

http://www.raf.mod.uk/downloads/gallery/marauder640.jpg

Beaufort-RAF
03-28-2006, 03:45 AM
14 Squadron in the Med.
http://14sqn-association.org.uk/gallery/fullsize/Marauder%20off%20Corsica.jpg
http://14sqn-association.org.uk/gallery/fullsize/Q%20nose%20in.jpg
http://14sqn-association.org.uk/gallery/fullsize/mauraderN.jpg
http://14sqn-association.org.uk/gallery/fullsize/Marauder%20M.jpg
http://14sqn-association.org.uk/gallery/fullsize/FK375%20D.jpg

wayno7777
03-28-2006, 09:54 PM
Nice!!!....

woofiedog
03-29-2006, 01:52 PM
A B-26 site that has some Pretty Good info and Photo's [a little bit of a wait for the site to open]...

Link: http://pages.zdnet.com/vancell/b26tailgunner/

Ernst_Rohr
03-29-2006, 06:40 PM
The B-26 is a sadly neglected aircraft, despite a very good combat record, it definatly has never gotten the recognition it deserved.

While I was working on my masters back in early 90's, I got involved in the West Texas oral history project. One of the really cool things it did was interview folks from the area about the early 20th century. Since I was the resident military history guy, I got to interview a lot of the vets that we have in there area, and I was amazed at how many of them there were.

One of the most amazing interviews I did was with a gentleman who had been a tail gunner on a B-26. He had a ton of souveniers and memorabilia from his WWII days, and the pictures he has are flat out amazing.

According to him, the major reason for the planes bad reputation was due to early operational usage. The 9th airforce didnt really seem to know what to do with them, and they flew a lot of early missions at very high altitude, and over long distances, operating like smaller B-17's. To accomplish this, the already heavily loaded aircraft were maxed out on fuel and carrying heavy bombloads. His squadron lost several aircraft on take off due to this. In particular, maneuvering the 26 at low airspeeds was dangerous, since loss of airflow over the wings at low speed would put the aircraft into a snap roll. When slow and heavily loaded, this was usually fatal.

According to him, the 9th airforce then decided to put the aircraft on the deck and close to base. His squadron was tasked with hitting locomotive stations and rail heads, along with material depots and supply dumps. The 26's faired somewhat better, but were taking a lot of casualties from groundfire. He had a lot of pictures from some of these missions, and he had a couple from a raid on a railyard that were amazing. The 26's came in on the deck to try to avoid ground fire and were so low to the ground that they were looking up at some of the buildings surrounding the railyard!

He still had several pieces of flak and spent shells that were pulled out of his AC from these missions.

As more dedicated ground attack planes became operational, the 26's were moved into a medium altitude bombing role, were they pretty much remained for the rest of the war. 26 squadrons were often assigned to take out V-1 and V-2 sites, and the crews dreaded the missions due to the incredibly heavy flak around those sites.

Some of the most amazing pictures were the ones he had of D-Day. From his seat in the back of the 26, he took several rolls of film of all the landing ships and support ships in the channel. To see how many ships they had out there was mind boggling!

I spent several hours with this gentleman, and he had a ton of stories to share. One thing I noticed in almost all of the interviews I did, is that the combat vets didnt really talk about the combat they had witness. They had dozens of stories of life in the military, or funny stories about mishaps, but rarely about the actual combat. When they did, it was often about the friends they lost or the sights they saw.

These people got called the Great Generations for a reason, they earned it. Looking at what they did then, and where we are now, I seriously doubt our self absorbed generation could do what they did, or sacrifice the way they did.

steiner562
03-29-2006, 08:38 PM
Nicely put Rohr.

wayno7777
03-29-2006, 10:40 PM
Thanks for sharing, in the book is a photo over Normandy where you can see the landed and crashed gliders in fields....

hotspace
03-30-2006, 05:52 AM
Hey, I've just seen some great photo's here of a great aircraft http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

I've never seen anyway photo's of the B-26 in RAF Service though, so thanks for that http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Monty_Thrud
03-30-2006, 07:29 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">
http://14sqn-association.org.uk/gallery/fullsize/Marauder%20M.jpg
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://premium1.uploadit.org/bsamania//IL2M_Marauder.jpg

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif?

WOLFMondo
03-30-2006, 07:59 AM
Hang on a minute! Thats a betty moonlighting as a Wellington!

ddsflyer
03-30-2006, 11:47 AM
Quote:

"Pres. Lyndon Johnson received a Silver Star while assigned to a B-26 unit in the Pacific. If anyone has more information on that, that would be interesting."

Lyndon Johnson was on the political fast track and the brass decided he needed to get air combat experienced so they put him on a milk-run mission with an experienced B-26 crew, and when he returned they awarded him the silver star.

horseback
03-30-2006, 12:18 PM
Lyndon Johnson, according to my memories from the time, did not make much of his war record-for very good reason.

As an up-and-coming young congressman from Texas at the outbreak of the war, he 'resigned' his seat to join the Navy and was 'appointed' the rank of Lieutenant Commander. FDR more or less appointed LBJ to be his 'eyes and ears' in the Southwest Pacific, and keep a close watch on MacArthur.

MacArthur, being no fool, allowed Johnson the run of the place only under adult supervision, and when he asked to ride along as an observer on a few bombing raids (he was also along for the ride on a at least one B-17 raid), arrangements were made for him to be cited for bravery as soon as he came under fire.

This allowed MacArthur to ship Johnson back Stateside as a 'hero' and get him out of his hair. FDR's next 'watchdog' was probably little more militarily aware and a bit less obviously political.

cheers

horseback