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View Full Version : Why is it bad to call a me109 a bf109?



Plunkertx
01-12-2008, 01:36 PM
A WWII luftwaffe vet told me to never call a me109 a bf109. But, I forgot why! I think it was something about Americanizing the name?

Anyone know more?

Plunkertx
01-12-2008, 01:36 PM
A WWII luftwaffe vet told me to never call a me109 a bf109. But, I forgot why! I think it was something about Americanizing the name?

Anyone know more?

leitmotiv
01-12-2008, 01:38 PM
Because it causes your hair to fall out.

VW-IceFire
01-12-2008, 01:38 PM
As far as I know the Bf109 was the factory designation and thats what stuck. They tried to change it later to Me109 but I think Bf109 is whats actually printed on the planes themselves. There was a good reason for the naming confusion and its in one of the Readme files or the manual...can't remember.

leitmotiv
01-12-2008, 01:46 PM
The 109 was originally a product of Bayerische Flugzeugwerke, Bavarian Airplane Company, hence, Bf.

AFSG_Bulldog
01-12-2008, 01:47 PM
Bf 109 was the official Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM: the German Aviation Ministry) designation, since the design was sent in by the Bayerische Flugzeugwerke company, and used exclusively in all official German documents dealing with this aircraft family. After the company was renamed Messerschmitt AG after July 1938, when Erhard Milch finally allowed Willy Messerschmitt to acquire the company, from that date forward, all Messerschmitt aircraft were to carry the "Me" designation &mdash except those already assigned a Bf prefix. Wartime documents from Messerschmitt AG, the RLM and others continued to use both designations, sometimes even on the same page but there were several RLM orders to deny acceptance of documents carrying the Me prefix for the Bf 109. Me 109 is known to have been the name used in print by the Luftwaffe propaganda publications as well as by the Messerschmitt company itself after July 1938, and the Luftwaffe personnel, who pronounced it may hundert-neun. The Me 109 designation was usually used in the English-speaking world. However, in both wartime and contemporary literature, both the "Bf" and "Me" prefixes are used. All extant airframes are described as "Bf 109" on identification plates, including the final K-14 models.

rnzoli
01-12-2008, 01:51 PM
Me = Willy Messerschmitt (designer)
Bf = Bayerische Flugzeugwerke (factory)

Maybe a similar story is the FW-190 = Focke-Wulf (factory) and the most advanced derivate Ta-152 (Kurt Tank, designer).

DuxCorvan
01-12-2008, 01:52 PM
The official name is Bf 109 because of the manufacturer. Messerschmitt designed them, but it was the Bayerische Flugzeugwerke ("Bf") which produced them. During the war, the factory was renamed after Messerschmitt, and hence the later Me designations for other types. However, most prewar designs retained their Bf designations (Bf 108, Bf 109 and Bf 110).

Maybe that LW vet didn't like it -who knows if there was some pun around it- but that's the way it was.

Edit: Wow, four posts saying the same at the same time.

leitmotiv
01-12-2008, 02:04 PM
You may hurt its feelings, and the National Organization to Prevent Misdesignations of Messerschmitt Products (NOPMMP) will commence a lawsuit against you for Aggravated Misdesignation Aggression for which the minimum sentence is 55 years at hard labor.

rnzoli
01-12-2008, 02:43 PM
What are you drinking, leitmotiv? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

JSG72
01-12-2008, 02:44 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AFSG_Bulldog:
Bf 109 was the official Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM: the German Aviation Ministry) designation, since the design was sent in by the Bayerische Flugzeugwerke company, and used exclusively in all official German documents dealing with this aircraft family. After the company was renamed Messerschmitt AG after July 1938, when Erhard Milch finally allowed Willy Messerschmitt to acquire the company, from that date forward, all Messerschmitt aircraft were to carry the "Me" designation &mdash except those already assigned a Bf prefix. Wartime documents from Messerschmitt AG, the RLM and others continued to use both designations, sometimes even on the same page but there were several RLM orders to deny acceptance of documents carrying the Me prefix for the Bf 109. Me 109 is known to have been the name used in print by the Luftwaffe propaganda publications as well as by the Messerschmitt company itself after July 1938, and the Luftwaffe personnel, who pronounced it may hundert-neun. The Me 109 designation was usually used in the English-speaking world. However, in both wartime and contemporary literature, both the "Bf" and "Me" prefixes are used. All extant airframes are described as "Bf 109" on identification plates, including the final K-14 models. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

Plunkertx
01-12-2008, 02:44 PM
Wow, those are some informative posts.

I may be wrong, not the vet. I may have had it backwards.

sgt.dumpster
01-12-2008, 03:07 PM
either way its the same beautiful plane!-astrogoth

Loco-S
01-12-2008, 03:30 PM
the Brits used to call it "Me 109" as to denote "its mine"..when things got tough, they began to call them "BF-109" as in Bloody fool-109"..hence the difference

luftluuver
01-12-2008, 03:48 PM
In mid to late war German documents one can find Bf109, Me109 and 9-109.

leitmotiv
01-12-2008, 03:51 PM
Because all the other things you could call it were obscene.

Ratsack
01-12-2008, 04:36 PM
They just called them 'hundert neun' in the field.

cheers,
Ratsack

leitmotiv
01-13-2008, 09:43 AM
That's best or British "one-oh-nine."

HuninMunin
01-13-2008, 10:07 AM
Hundrednine would sound better in my ears.

leitmotiv
01-13-2008, 10:10 AM
but of course!


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