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View Full Version : Boeing 757 takes 2 Herons down the STBD engine on rotation the MOVIE



Taylortony
05-09-2007, 11:03 AM
Impressively caught on film at Manchester Airport about a week ago, go full screen and wind up the audio......... indeed at the end of the film wait and you will get a slow mo of the bird strike..........

http://www.flightlevel350.com/Aircraft_Boeing_757-200-A...tion_Video-8457.html (http://www.flightlevel350.com/Aircraft_Boeing_757-200-Airline_Thomsonfly_Aviation_Video-8457.html)

Taylortony
05-09-2007, 11:03 AM
Impressively caught on film at Manchester Airport about a week ago, go full screen and wind up the audio......... indeed at the end of the film wait and you will get a slow mo of the bird strike..........

http://www.flightlevel350.com/Aircraft_Boeing_757-200-A...tion_Video-8457.html (http://www.flightlevel350.com/Aircraft_Boeing_757-200-Airline_Thomsonfly_Aviation_Video-8457.html)

MEGILE
05-09-2007, 12:01 PM
No doubt about it..

I would have needed a shower and a fresh pair of pants.

Mysticpuma2003
05-09-2007, 12:59 PM
Now that just shows that whatever anyone thinks, those engines are pretty robust, but I would have been in the queue behind you for the shower!

ddpairborne59
05-09-2007, 01:14 PM
Wow! Drama in the highest. Fried birdie, if that was a bird.

Philipscdrw
05-09-2007, 01:50 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ddpairborne59:
Wow! Drama in the highest. Fried birdie, if that was a bird. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Look at the last few seconds of the vid: he highlights the bird.

rnzoli
05-09-2007, 02:07 PM
Maybe I am not right, but it's not that dangerous as it looks, the engine is not on fire, as far as I know it's the excess fuel, which lights up periodically behind the engine, because it doesn't burn inside the engine as it should (due to compressor blade failure after the bird strike). Although it is very inconvenient to get a bird strike at Vr, perhaps this is the most practiced engine failure in the world, and there is spare thrust in the left engine to continue climbing (albeit at a slower rate).

Of course the birds see the story from a different perspecive!

Blottogg
05-10-2007, 12:19 AM
Neat film, thanks for the link. A couple of thoughts:

1) Well handled by everyone on the ground and in the aircraft. There were several points during the emergency where things could have gone badly had the players not been up to the task. It didn't, and they were.

2) Nice climb angle, even after they got #2 shut down. Its single-engined performance reminded me of a 727 with all of its engines running.

3) The incident reminded me of an engine ad I saw in an old Aviation Week. "This engine ate a flock of starlings, a block of ice and a 6' aluminum step ladder, and kept running." Apparently two herons (big birds to hit) were beyond even this engine's capacity. Still, it was putting out some thrust after the injestion, though obviously unhappy. As we used to tell the students, "let it burn until you get away from the ground, it puts out more thrust that way."

DEY_RAVEN_UK
05-10-2007, 01:04 AM
I work as a maintenance engineer at manchester airport and i live about 1 mile from the runway right underneath the flightpath. That morning i was laying some flags in my garden and i could see the thompson 757 fly over,the noise was terrible and i new something was very wrong with one of the engines. Listening to an aircraft at full power with one engine surging like that realy makes you appreciate how much power is involved during takeoff.
I have never heard a noise like that...put it this way...All of the street was outside looking up

Banger2004
05-10-2007, 04:27 AM
For me, aside from the fact the aircraft could still fly at such a crucial moment, I find the professionalism of all involved to be stunning.

Of course I am aware that they train rigorously for these events, but that is the sort of people I would want around me when I lose my head!

WWSpinDry
05-10-2007, 08:41 AM
Holy sheepdip. Gave me gooseflesh. Kudos to everyone involved in that.

rnzoli
05-10-2007, 09:40 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DEY_RAVEN_UK:
Listening to an aircraft at full power with one engine surging like that realy makes you appreciate how much power is involved during takeoff.
I have never heard a noise like that...put it this way...All of the street was outside looking up </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I haven't heard such engine myself, but also know from another incident that an engine mechanic will immediately tell you what is happening without looking http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif I guess it gives a loud howling sounds, right?

@Banger2004: The video clip also demonstrates, why you should never lose your head by putting it into an engine inlet when it throttles up http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif There is a known incident on a carrier, where ground personnel was sucked into the turbine engine when the pilot added power. Miraculously, the person was saved by the stationary blades at the inlet. Maybe someone can find that video.