PDA

View Full Version : A P-39 question.................



chris455
02-22-2004, 09:21 PM
Maybe the "Airacognocenti" in the community can answer this question, I tried finding my own answer on the web, but only became more confused.
Which models of the P-39 (as modelled in FB), if any, were used by US forces?
I know that the N1 lacks the curved armor shield that the other 2 have, and I am aware of the armament differences, but were ANY of these birds used by the US (important note: I KNOW the P-39 was used by the USAAF. I want to know if the specific versions modelled in FB wer used by the Americans)
There. I think I asked it correctly. My thanks in advance!
S!
Chris

http://members.cox.net/miataman1/P47.jpg

chris455
02-22-2004, 09:21 PM
Maybe the "Airacognocenti" in the community can answer this question, I tried finding my own answer on the web, but only became more confused.
Which models of the P-39 (as modelled in FB), if any, were used by US forces?
I know that the N1 lacks the curved armor shield that the other 2 have, and I am aware of the armament differences, but were ANY of these birds used by the US (important note: I KNOW the P-39 was used by the USAAF. I want to know if the specific versions modelled in FB wer used by the Americans)
There. I think I asked it correctly. My thanks in advance!
S!
Chris

http://members.cox.net/miataman1/P47.jpg

ElAurens
02-22-2004, 09:36 PM
Yes.

The last P39s were delivered to the USAAF in august of 1944, they were Q-30 models. Most P39s were used in the continental US as flight trainer aircraft, but many served in the Pacific and Med.

_____________________________

http://www.blitzpigs.com/forum/images/avatars/Curtiss_logo.gif

BlitzPig_EL

DangerForward
02-22-2004, 09:38 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by chris455:
Maybe the "Airacognocenti" in the community can answer this question, I tried finding my own answer on the web, but only became more confused.
Which models of the P-39 (as modelled in FB), if any, were used by US forces?
I know that the N1 lacks the curved armor shield that the other 2 have, and I am aware of the armament differences, but were ANY of these birds used by the US (important note: I KNOW the P-39 was used by the USAAF. I want to know if the specific versions modelled in FB wer used by the Americans)
There. I think I asked it correctly. My thanks in advance!
S!
Chris

http://members.cox.net/miataman1/P47.jpg <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think all of them were used to some extent by the US, but even before the "N" model the short range limited the action the P39s saw for the US.

DangerFoward

VW-IceFire
02-22-2004, 10:10 PM
I think the majority of frontline USAAF activity for the P-39 was the A-D models. I'm not entirely sure after that but I think it was largely withdrawn from frontline service after that point.

http://home.cogeco.ca/~cczerneda/sigs/temp_sig1.jpg
RCAF 412 Falcon Squadron - "Swift to Avenge"

JR_Greenhorn
02-22-2004, 11:39 PM
"The P-39D (along with the P-400) was the first to see combat in US service."


"Not all of the P-39D-1 and D-2 aircraft were delivered to the Soviet Union. Several dozen were taken on charge by USAAC squadrons and were flown in combat. Some of these P-39D-1s (along with the P-400) were flown by the 347th Fighter Group at Guadalcanal in August of 1942. Some flew with the 31st Fighter Group in North Africa in 1943."

"26 P-39D aircraft were modified to P-39D-3 reconnaissance configuration."
"The P-39D-4-BE was the designation given to 11 similar modifications of the P-39-1-BE. The D-3 and D-4 saw action exclusively in Italy."


"Some P-39Ks were flown in New Guinea in 1943."


"P-39Ls flew in New Guinea and North African in 1943."


"Some P-39Ms flew in North Africa in 1944."


"Most of the P-39Qs were delivered to the Soviet Union. Only a few ended up serving with American units. One of these was the 332nd Fighter Group which took on 75 P-39Qs in Italy in February 1944. After only two months, these Airacobras were replaced by P-47s, finally retiring the type from US service."


All of the above quotes were gleaned from Joe Baugher's P-39 pages (http://home.att.net/~jbaugher1/p39.html).
See also: Wartime Service of P-39 with USAAF (http://home.att.net/~jbaugher1/p39_17.html).


Further, these pages offer some distinguishing characteristics among types.

The A suffix appears to have been unused.
The XP-39B was a revised XP-39.

Suffixes F, G, J, K, and L seem to be only minor changes and redesignations.
Suffixes H, I, O, and P were not used.


Lastly, I find this quite interesting:
"The most serious change, however, was the elimination of the turbosupercharger, and its replacement by a single-stage geared supercharger. This change was a result of a shift in philosophy on the part of the USAAC. The USAAC believed that the widths of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans made the USA virtually immune from high-altitude attack by enemy bombers. Therefore, the development of high-altitude interceptors was curtailed in favor of strike fighters optimized for low-level close support."

In addition, I have read elsewhere that the USAAC "clipped & streamlined" the XP-39, which aggravated unsavory handling characteristics.

Its ironic that the P-39 was nuetered by the USAAC, then riduculed forevermore becuase of these changes. Certainly Bell Aircraft Co. must not have been pleased with this situation.

Overall, the P-39 is a fine plane despite those changes and the fact that its design began in 1936.

[This message was edited by JR_Greenhorn on Sun February 22 2004 at 11:20 PM.]

tttiger
02-23-2004, 01:22 AM
This isn't what you asked but it's a very good discussion of use of the P-39 in the Soviet Union.

Contrary to what St. Oleg would have us believe, the vast majority of the P-39s sent to Russia in the first half (well into 1943) of the war were the British (but not for long) Airacobra I and P-39D-2s, not the P-39Ns we have:

http://airforce.users.ru/lend-lease/english/articles/romanenko/index.htm

It's a plane I never have been able to master in FB, although I fly it in Coops now and then. My hat's off to those who fly it well.

Aloha & S!

ttt

"I want the one that kills the best with the least amount of risk to me"

-- Chuck Yeager describing "The Best Airplane."