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jbracer
04-28-2004, 06:44 PM
Hello,
I have to congratulate the staff in advance for this game. All of the research and fact finding opens a tool not only to playing a war era recreation, but opens a whole new way to learn about the battles, weapons, planning, etc. of a specific era.
Years ago, when I read the manual for European Airwar, I read the latter half of the book which covers the historical end of the airwar in Europe. I learned a lot about it, and became interested in studying more of it...
You guys open the door for everyone (young people especially) to learn from your research via a great game and a more user friendly platform. (when's the last time you picked up a book?, well, most ppl)
Anyway, my hats off to you and thanks to everyone for all of their hard work!!! Cant wait for PF.....

Tom Whitemore

back to AEP....

jbracer
04-28-2004, 06:44 PM
Hello,
I have to congratulate the staff in advance for this game. All of the research and fact finding opens a tool not only to playing a war era recreation, but opens a whole new way to learn about the battles, weapons, planning, etc. of a specific era.
Years ago, when I read the manual for European Airwar, I read the latter half of the book which covers the historical end of the airwar in Europe. I learned a lot about it, and became interested in studying more of it...
You guys open the door for everyone (young people especially) to learn from your research via a great game and a more user friendly platform. (when's the last time you picked up a book?, well, most ppl)
Anyway, my hats off to you and thanks to everyone for all of their hard work!!! Cant wait for PF.....

Tom Whitemore

back to AEP....

FWdreamer
04-29-2004, 07:47 AM
S!
I hear ya JBracer, as a teacher (special education) i can see first hand how these kids can barely remeber hearing anything about ww2 or even when it happened. Yet when they see me pop on these forums during lunch they are amazed by the planes and details of the game. When i first got cfs2 that was the first time i learned about the other half of the conflict. I mainly focused on the German Whermacht and tiger and their tanks. I read the cfs2 manual cover to cover because it was so insightful. Hell even with LOMAC is fascinating in seeing how all the radar works and how combat with missles has changed. Maddox andLuthiers gangs have done some fabulous work both in terms of simming and teaching history that many did not know.

Fwdreamer.

Latico
04-29-2004, 05:58 PM
I've kind of wondered if anyone else had noticed the educational value of Combat Flight Sims. A while back I read somewhere on the Internet about a group of guys that were introducing aviation to kids using the MS Flight Simulator and I think they were also integrating the sim with VATSIM to teach them how to work with ATC.

Now, as for Combat Flight Sims, The education might be just a little bit different. Not only can it be a big history lesson, but it COULD be an aid in teaching kids the value of team work. Particularly those sims that allow for co-operative multiplayer mission flights.

I've been flying Janes Fighters Anthology for about 3 years with a great bunch of guys that understand the value of teamwork. I've posted in other threads on this. Not unlike other combat flight sims, the initial scoring of kills pretain to ATA. YOu have to go into additional pages to find the ground kills. But in most co-op missions the prime goal is to get Mission Accomplished. In a multi-role mission we have TARCAP, SEAD, and stike flights. Everyone has a job to do, and it is vital that we do those jobs well, or we could easily get a mission failure. Understanding the importance of "doing a job well" we train in all aspects of air combat. From ATA engagements to ground pounding in all types of air craft. Combine that training with tactical co-ordination of our respective flight wings and we get a well orchestrated effort.

Now, I'm wondering how this might help some kids that might have some social issues (don't work well with others). Even if you didn't use a combat simulater, think about teaching them to concentrate enough to participate in a vertual precision flight team. My guess is that it would take even more dedication and training to do this. I've kicked the idea around of doing this with the thought of getting the guys involve that do this for real. Like the Blue Angels or Thunderbirds (yeah I know there are other countries with similar flight units) in some way as an insentive for the kids.

AS for the history of WWII, I don't think you can teach it correctly unless you teach the kids about what started it in the first place. From what I've learned, you have to go back to the end of WWI. There were allot of things going on during the time between those 2 wars that allowed certain individuals to drag the world into the second WW.