PDA

View Full Version : Blue U.S. carrier decks?



Timex62
06-25-2004, 03:51 PM
OK folks, it's time to enlighten me. Back in my CFS2 days there was a mod to change the U.S. carrier decks color. It stated that this was done shortly after Pearl Harbor to "tone them down and make them less visible". Can anyone provide more info as to the validity of this and if it will be modeled in PF? Thanx.

Close to the Edge

Timex62
06-25-2004, 03:51 PM
OK folks, it's time to enlighten me. Back in my CFS2 days there was a mod to change the U.S. carrier decks color. It stated that this was done shortly after Pearl Harbor to "tone them down and make them less visible". Can anyone provide more info as to the validity of this and if it will be modeled in PF? Thanx.

Close to the Edge

Yellonet
06-25-2004, 04:04 PM
Haven't seen or heard anything that would suggest blue flight-decks...


- Yellonet

Sakai9745
06-25-2004, 04:17 PM
I can vouch for this. Having recently completed a Saratoga carrier model in circa-1943 apperance, the paint scheme called for the flight deck was a 'North Pacific Blue'. This was also stated by Lt. Richard Best of VB-6 off the Enterprise, who led dive-bombing attacks against the Japanese at Midway. He stated in an interview how much he was surprised that the Japanese flight decks were so brightly painted, as all US carriers at the time had theirs' painted a 'North Pacific Blue'.

The color isn't so much 'blue' per se, but more gray with a hint of blue in it. Hope this helps. Cheers.

Al - SF, Calif

"Defense Dept regrets to inform you that your sons are dead cause they were stupid."

Latico
06-25-2004, 05:34 PM
Here's a site that has all teh camo schemes for the US Navy.

US Navy Camo Schemes (http://www.shipcamouflage.com/warship_camouflage.htm)

I've found several pics of the CV6 in the all blue scheme, (decks, hull, and bulkheads) as well as other US navy ships.

Fliger747
06-25-2004, 10:29 PM
Carrier decks were variously painted "deck blue" or left a natural weather wood color. Photos of the Lexington (new) at sea in mid to late 1943 shows the ship had a blue deck, changed later to natural wood. I don't know the exact reason for this, but it could have been an attempt to reduce the flamability and toxicicity (from smoke) of the decking material. Many modifications to ships were made as the war progressed to reduce fire hazard, including removal of linoelum etc. Other posibilities include the frictional coefficent of the surface (slick).

Any way it varied from ship to ship and with the time period.

Latico
06-25-2004, 11:48 PM
The wooden decks were actually stained, not painted.

Fliger747
06-26-2004, 01:36 AM
Having wielded both a chipping hammer and a "Holy Stone" I would have guessed paint as opposed to stain, as stain is a penetrating finish, and paint a surface finish. Photos show and personal experience indicates that the "finish" applied to wooden decks on carriers, crusiers and BB's was intended to be (and was) removable. Most marine finish I have seen on wooden surfaces dating from that era were either paint, or varnish on "fancy work".

Having looked down at a lot of ships at sea, I would opine that any "camoflage" attempts applied to horizontal urfaces was relatively inefective. Haze grey and some of the other schemes are somewhat more usefull when applied to verticle surfaces.

Only a Bosun's Mate would know for sure!

Flydutch
06-26-2004, 04:25 AM
Yeah, still something that needs attention is that Airbases, cargo ships and navy where seriously camouflaged during wartime since they where the priced targets!

If you look at WWII colour film or photo you will see camo painted hangars and all convoy ships (Even sailing ships) painted grey

It is very unrealistic how bright the concrete landing strips the hangars and ships are right now

tedinaz
06-26-2004, 08:12 AM
The decks were stained with norfolk deck stain #20. Prior to November 1941, decks were stained maroon.

No fleet carrier was "Natural wood", though there is a famous series of photos showing the Sara with a weathered deck.

Paint was not used...

http://shipcamouflage.com/

Fliger747
06-26-2004, 09:29 AM
Check out some of the color photos of the Yorktown (new) in 1943, that have been published, showing both deck blue and natural wood. I am in the Middle East at present(not Ohio) and about 12 time zones from my references, but I believe the book was titled "Carrier Warfare in the Pacific", a book mostly of existing color photo from that era.

The existing battleships of the Iowa class have a teak deck, which is currently (and since at least the 60's) natural wood. This weathers to a light gray unless policed regularly by a large deck force with holy stones. This was (ahem) "colored" deck blue to match the steel decks above the 01 level in the superstructure during the war.

As a former scratch builder of ships of the era I tend to be sceptical of anything but original sources. It is possible that stain was used, but I have never seen any in a paint locker on a warship. I was privlidgd to visit the Bunkerhill when she was still laid up in the reserve fleet in Bremerton Wa in the 60's and the original wooden deck was covered with some sort of preservitive "stuff" at the time. She was never converted or used to any extent after the war due to a twisted keel from all of her battle damage, at least that was the scuttlebutt. A great and historic "lady", gone like many to the knackers.

A minor, but interesting point, so either color could be appropriate depending on the ship and the date.