PDA

View Full Version : Bet not many have heard of this A/C !



The.Tyke
06-06-2004, 11:43 AM
Was just looking through my Dad's logbooks to remind myself what he was doing June5/6th 1944. I had forgotten that he was in fact flying one of the forgotten RAF aircraft, an Albemarle ll.
His log book has an entry for the night of 5th June, "10 paratroops dropped in the Caen area, no squadron a/c lost"
Needless to say he survived the war (I'M NOT THAT OLD !), despite going on to fly Stirlings.

The.Tyke
06-06-2004, 11:43 AM
Was just looking through my Dad's logbooks to remind myself what he was doing June5/6th 1944. I had forgotten that he was in fact flying one of the forgotten RAF aircraft, an Albemarle ll.
His log book has an entry for the night of 5th June, "10 paratroops dropped in the Caen area, no squadron a/c lost"
Needless to say he survived the war (I'M NOT THAT OLD !), despite going on to fly Stirlings.

gombal40
06-06-2004, 12:04 PM
http://www.xs4all.nl/~nijssie/armstrongalbemarle.jpg Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle ST Mk II: Similar to ST Mk I special transport with equipment changes and dorsal turret re-introduced. Ninety-nine built.
Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle ST Mk I: Special transport version (troop carrier) with operational bombing equipment, ventral turret and fuselage fuel tanks removed; dorsal turret replaced by hand-operated Rose two-gun installation with sliding hood. Freight load-ing doors in starboard fuselage side and paratroop jump doors in rear fuselage floor. Malcolm glider towing hook at rear of fuse-lage. Built in Srs 1, Srs 2 and Srs 3 versions with small equipment changes. 12 supplied to Soviet Union, 1943/44.

The.Tyke
06-06-2004, 01:02 PM
Nice one Gombal !
I've not seen that before,I think I might print out your post and put it in his log book for future generations, thanks.

MB_Avro
06-06-2004, 03:11 PM
Interesting post Tyke and very topical. Any more information?

arcadeace
06-06-2004, 03:20 PM
Its neat guys. Rare airplanes like that especially when participating in the war are always of interest http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/222_1082457373_222_1082441075_airaces.jpg

XyZspineZyX
06-06-2004, 03:41 PM
If we could only take the nose of a Blenheim and graft it to the tail of a Pe-2 we could have this plane.
Very nice find.

http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/9334/Image6.jpg

Dunkelgrun
06-06-2004, 04:14 PM
Thanks for the pic. I'd heard of it but never knew that it was such an odd-looking thing.
Cheers!

http://www.uploadit.org/igmusapa/tft2.jpg
www.nightbomber.com (http://www.nightbomber.com)

Dunkelgrun aka 242Sqn_Cat

horseback
06-06-2004, 10:09 PM
That pic of the Albmarle looks like the result of a three way collision between a Blenheim, a Maryland, and a Lockheed Vega...

Ever seen a picture of the GM Fisher P-75?

cheers

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944

Franzen
06-06-2004, 10:16 PM
Wow, nice looking plane. I'd like to see it in our planelist. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz Franzen

ImpStarDuece
06-06-2004, 10:29 PM
The Albemarle is another of those 'forgotten' planes of WW2. Like so many others that never quite panned out in their intended role it went on to do sterling service in a variety of less glamourous theaters and positions. Transports and glider carriers eem to be the last ones out of the blocks in publicity terms.

The Brits had quite a few 'also rans' designed as bombers. The Bristol Buckingham, Vickers Warwick and the Handley Page Hampden all spring to mind. Lets not forget the Halifax as well, the forgotten brother of the Lancaster.

Maybe we can talk Oleg into making a Forgotten Planes sim, including the Polish, Romanian, Italian and Dutch aircraft that never get any publicity. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Flying Bullet Magnet... Catching Lead Since 2002

"There's no such thing as gravity, the earth sucks!"

Obi_Kwiet
06-06-2004, 11:04 PM
OH! So those shots of what I thought were Lancaster's being the Paratrooper planes on "The Longest Day" were actualy these! cool!

The.Tyke
06-07-2004, 12:30 PM
Did'nt realize they were destined for the USSR.
http://www.raf38group.org/ussr

gombal40
06-07-2004, 01:03 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by The.Tyke:
Was just looking through my Dad's logbooks to remind myself what he was doing June5/6th 1944. I had forgotten that he was in fact flying one of the forgotten RAF aircraft, an Albemarle ll.
His log book has an entry for the night of 5th June, "10 paratroops dropped in the Caen area, no squadron a/c lost"
.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Maybe he flew this plane, it has the invasion stripes and only 99 were build. Mayby some info in you're book or get some info from his old squad. Just maybe you are looking at you're dad.

u have some more info?

gombal40
06-07-2004, 01:09 PM
http://gr.fipu.krasnoyarsk.edu/camms/archive/ww2_bombers/0070/pics/0070_9_1.jpg

some colour makes it just a tad better don't you think?

gombal40
06-07-2004, 01:14 PM
http://gr.fipu.krasnoyarsk.edu/camms/archive/ww2_bombers/0070/pics/0070_9_1_b1.jpg

nice ones i think

gombal40
06-07-2004, 01:16 PM
found something:
plane belonged to Sqn: 297 Sqn, RAF
so see below
D-Day
297 Squadron were heavily involved in the opening exchanges of the invasion, and their tasks were four fold on the night of the 5th June. In the first phase, 4 Albemarles were provided to carry 40 pathfinders, 10 men of the 22nd Independent Parachute Company and 30 of the 5th Parachute Brigade, to the same drop zone, 6 miles north-east of Caen. In the event the deployment was entirely successful, the only problems being that two aircraft were compelled to make two passes over the drop zone to discharge all of their troops, who were having difficulty in negotiating the aperture door.
Following on approximately 40 minutes behind the pathfinders was the main force of the 5th Para Brigade, and 9 Albemarles of 297 Squadron were involved in this phase of the operation. Due to a high degree of congestion over the drop zone, several aircraft had to make a second pass, however all troops were deployed at the cost of only a few aircraft having sustained superficial damage, though one Albemarle landed at Ford with only one functioning engine.

gombal40
06-07-2004, 01:31 PM
and u should visit this site its about 279 Squadron B. board.
maybe you can give some answer or ask questions.

http://www.worldwar2exraf.co.uk/Aircrewnoticeboard18.html#120]

http://www.worldwar2exraf.co.uk/photogallert.html

gombal40
06-07-2004, 01:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by The.Tyke:
Nice one Gombal !
I've not seen that before,I think I might print out your post and put it in his log book for future generations, thanks.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

just dowload the pic send it to digital photo shop and u have a high quality foto again. No need to print. Prints do fade fast I would do the same with the coloured ones if i where u. Then see the above posts and try to make it as complete as you can. Then u can hand over a piece of family history to you're next of kin

The.Tyke
06-07-2004, 03:13 PM
Thanks very much for all your info Gombal. I think my Dad's a/c may have been one of the a/c with problems dipatching the paras.
He has written a note to say a Maj.Collinwood (stick leader)fell into the door aperture head first and was jammed by his kit, whilst he was manouevering to avoid flak. They only managed to free him just prior to landing !

gombal40
06-08-2004, 12:06 AM
glad to help http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif