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Blackfleet
09-12-2004, 11:14 PM
Can there be a Historical mission Oakville and U-94 http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/784.gif ?

Otto Ites was a young and successful submarine commander. He had sunk over 100,000 tons of allied shipping and had received the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross from Hitler. He was 24, and on the night of August 27, 1942 his career was to come to an abrupt though not fatal end.

Hal Lawrence was a Sub-Lieutenant on the Royal Canadian Navy's corvette HMCS Oakville, escorting convoy TAW-15. He had already served for three years in the North Atlantic before being assigned to warmer waters. Tankers of the convoy were carrying fuel from Trinidad to New York, on the first leg of their perilous voyage to Europe.On that same night, Lawrence was to earn the Distinguished Service Cross. He was 22.

Ites, captain of U-94, moved his submarine into position for a night torpedo attack on convoy TAW-15. A short distance away, Sub-Lt. Lawrence was on the bridge-watch of the Oakville when, in the moonlight, a USN aircraft spotted U-94. The sub went into an emergency dive and the plane dropped a pattern of depth bombs. HMCS Oakville headed for the plumes of water.

From "A Bloody War - One Man's Memories of the Canadian Navy 1939-45"
by Hal Lawrence

"Fire a depth-charge pattern when we cross the spot where those depth-bombs landed," rapped the Captain.
Lieutenant-Commander Clarence King had won a Distinguished Service Cross in the First World War for sinking one U-boat and getting two "probables". His score in this war was zero and he didn't like it.

He was quivering but his voice was controlled. Oakville trembled under the thrust of her screw at full speed. I pressed the fire-bell; out arched depth-charges, one either side from the throwers; three splashed off the stern. We tensed. Because of our relatively slow speed these things could damage us as well. With a rumble they exploded. Water erupted to mast-head height. Oakville bucked, shuddered, and resumed her eager trembling. Poor old girl; there was worse to come.

Before the reverberations died out there came a low drumming note in our earphones. The low drumming sound changed to the clamour of fast engines and the unmistakable turbulence of a submarine blowing her ballast tanks. She was surfacing.

A black snout reared out of the water. The conning tower burst through a swell and she surfaced completely. Water cascaded from her decks, white and foamy in the moonlight.

The captain altered course to ram. Two rockets, the submarine-sighted signal, hissed skyward and burst into white stars.

We had only about 300 feet to maneuver in. The captain couldn't make it and we missed. U-94 bumped down the port side. The captain opened the range to get another run-in. This gave the gunners a chance.

Our four-inch gun roared out again and again. Two splashes we saw and then a satisfying orange flash on the submarine's conning tower. The Oerlikon [20 mm] gun banged away, the red tracer flowing out and ricocheting at wild angles off the pressure-hull of U-94. Our bow swung on again.

Now the .5 inch machine guns started their insane chatter. The port gunner, ignoring the captain's ear just six inches from the muzzle, let go the first burst. Have you ever seen a standing side-jump of twelve feet? Captain King did one that night. Olympic standard, I thought, and him fiftyish too.

We bore in. The 4-inch flashed again and U-94's 88mm gun rocked over. Four streams of lead spewed from the .5's, and down below I could hear the Lewis gun spitting. With precision and speed the German gunners poured out and made for their weapons. In that murderous fire none made it.

Ites was maneuvering U-94 with skill and by now at good speed. We hit with only a glancing blow; again U-94 passed down the port side, this time about twenty feet off. Now we unleashed a weapon hitherto untried in modern warfare.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Imagine, if you can, six stokers pelting the enemy
with Coke bottles at twenty feet


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stationed on the fiddley abaft the funnel were six stokers not needed in the engine room during action. Their job was to reload the depth-charge throwers. But we weren't firing the throwers so these stokers had nothing to do. And yet here were German faces on the bridge of a U-boat just a few feet away. U-94 was so close our guns could not depress to fire. Also on the fiddley abaft the funnel, the canteen manager stowed his empty Coke bottles. To stokers, ignorant engineers uninstructed in the art of war, the connection was obvious.

Imagine, if you can, six stokers pelting the enemy with Coke bottles at twenty feet, crying, "Yah! Yah!" Ducking heads on U-94 testified to their accuracy. If Ites' courage ever forsook him, it must have been then.

Depth charges were fired again. One exploded directly under her. She bucked, spray obscured her, then she slowed. Oakville opened the range. If destroyers are 'greyhounds of the fleet', corvettes are the tenacious terriers. We opened range, swung round, and plunged in the third time. The two .5 inch sent a steady stream of fire at U-94. Bullets whinged off at wild angles, red tracer glowing hot. The captain was getting the hang of it - this time his aim was sure. At right angles we struck U-94, our bow reared up, and U-94 rolled under. Beneath our bottom we felt three distinct shocks and heard rending metal. U-94 wallowed astern, and stopped. But Father [nickname for the captain] was just warming up.

"Away boarding party," he cried. "Come on, Lawrence! Get cracking! Never mind lowering the boat; I'll put you alongside."

I thought sceptically of his two misses.

In the confusion of a misfire in the 4-inch gun, and then a blast from it as it fired again, the boarding party became disorganized. Lawrence, suffering a nose-bleed from the muzzle blast, jumped onto the deck of the submarine. Only Petty Officer Powell was able to follow as the gap between the vessels widened and they drifted apart. Lawrence and Powell were two men against thirty still able-bodied Germans.

Lawrence knocked one German from behind the wrecked 88mm gun into the water. As they rounded the connning tower, two more Germans jumped into the water and Powell knocked a third off the sub. Twenty-six to two, but more Germans were coming out of the conning tower.

Lawrence ordered the first two out to stop but they kept coming. At three feet, he fired his .45 pistol and the impact flipped the leading German backwards over the side. Powell shot the second; a third, half-out, ducked below again. Lawrence and Powell commanded the only useable exit. An open deck hatch led to only a flooded compartment. The submarine was dead in the water and effectively captured, the crew prisoners below.

However, the crew had opened the sea-***** to scuttle the submarine and they had to be let on deck to complete the surrender. Lawrence waved them out with his pistol. No more casualties occurred as the defeated submariners emerged and milled about on deck. Their number included Otto Ites who had a broken arm, and bullet wounds in the other.

Powell covered them with his pistol while Lawrence went below to try to shut off the flooding and prevent the sinking of the sub. He found the valves, but the control room was already awash in chest-deep seawater and bulkheads began to give way. Powell shouted a warning from above. Lawrence clambered out.

The two Canadian officers and their twenty-six German prisoners jumped off the sub into the dark water, and U-94 sank below the waves for the last time. In the distance, the crump of exploding torpedoes and pillars of flame showed other U-boats busy at their work.

The ramming had done considerable hull damage to the Oakville and the corvette was limping. For a while she was in danger of explosion from flooding in the boiler room.

The destroyer USS Lea picked up Lawrence and most of the prisoners. Oakville's skiff picked up Powell and a half-dozen Germans, including Ites, the U-boat commander. By 0100 hours that same night, Lawrence, who had been transferred back to the Oakville, was standing his regular watch.

Nineteen Germans on U-94 died. Oakville had not a single casualty. It did have one injury. When Lawrence slipped down U-94's conning tower hatch to try to stop the flooding, he cut his elbow on a shard from a Coke bottle.

The King has been graciously pleased to approve the following award:
Distinguished Service Cross
Lieutenant Harold Ernest Thomas Lawrence,
RCNVR, HMCS Oakville
For gallant and courageous action in close contact with the enemy.

"Lieutenant Lawrence was in charge of a boarding party of two which attempted to prevent the scuttling of a U-boat. With complete disregard for his own safety, this officer, accompanied by a Petty Officer, boarded the U-boat and, having subdued the enemy crew, he took action in an endeavour to prevent the scuttling of the U-boat, notwithstanding the fact that it was then sinking. His spirited and determined conduct was worthy of the highest traditions of the Royal Canadian Navy."
http://www.geocities.com/ikvwarlord/gimp_temp.2651181.gif

[This message was edited by Blackfleet on Mon September 13 2004 at 03:49 PM.]

Blackfleet
09-12-2004, 11:14 PM
Can there be a Historical mission Oakville and U-94 http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/784.gif ?

Otto Ites was a young and successful submarine commander. He had sunk over 100,000 tons of allied shipping and had received the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross from Hitler. He was 24, and on the night of August 27, 1942 his career was to come to an abrupt though not fatal end.

Hal Lawrence was a Sub-Lieutenant on the Royal Canadian Navy's corvette HMCS Oakville, escorting convoy TAW-15. He had already served for three years in the North Atlantic before being assigned to warmer waters. Tankers of the convoy were carrying fuel from Trinidad to New York, on the first leg of their perilous voyage to Europe.On that same night, Lawrence was to earn the Distinguished Service Cross. He was 22.

Ites, captain of U-94, moved his submarine into position for a night torpedo attack on convoy TAW-15. A short distance away, Sub-Lt. Lawrence was on the bridge-watch of the Oakville when, in the moonlight, a USN aircraft spotted U-94. The sub went into an emergency dive and the plane dropped a pattern of depth bombs. HMCS Oakville headed for the plumes of water.

From "A Bloody War - One Man's Memories of the Canadian Navy 1939-45"
by Hal Lawrence

"Fire a depth-charge pattern when we cross the spot where those depth-bombs landed," rapped the Captain.
Lieutenant-Commander Clarence King had won a Distinguished Service Cross in the First World War for sinking one U-boat and getting two "probables". His score in this war was zero and he didn't like it.

He was quivering but his voice was controlled. Oakville trembled under the thrust of her screw at full speed. I pressed the fire-bell; out arched depth-charges, one either side from the throwers; three splashed off the stern. We tensed. Because of our relatively slow speed these things could damage us as well. With a rumble they exploded. Water erupted to mast-head height. Oakville bucked, shuddered, and resumed her eager trembling. Poor old girl; there was worse to come.

Before the reverberations died out there came a low drumming note in our earphones. The low drumming sound changed to the clamour of fast engines and the unmistakable turbulence of a submarine blowing her ballast tanks. She was surfacing.

A black snout reared out of the water. The conning tower burst through a swell and she surfaced completely. Water cascaded from her decks, white and foamy in the moonlight.

The captain altered course to ram. Two rockets, the submarine-sighted signal, hissed skyward and burst into white stars.

We had only about 300 feet to maneuver in. The captain couldn't make it and we missed. U-94 bumped down the port side. The captain opened the range to get another run-in. This gave the gunners a chance.

Our four-inch gun roared out again and again. Two splashes we saw and then a satisfying orange flash on the submarine's conning tower. The Oerlikon [20 mm] gun banged away, the red tracer flowing out and ricocheting at wild angles off the pressure-hull of U-94. Our bow swung on again.

Now the .5 inch machine guns started their insane chatter. The port gunner, ignoring the captain's ear just six inches from the muzzle, let go the first burst. Have you ever seen a standing side-jump of twelve feet? Captain King did one that night. Olympic standard, I thought, and him fiftyish too.

We bore in. The 4-inch flashed again and U-94's 88mm gun rocked over. Four streams of lead spewed from the .5's, and down below I could hear the Lewis gun spitting. With precision and speed the German gunners poured out and made for their weapons. In that murderous fire none made it.

Ites was maneuvering U-94 with skill and by now at good speed. We hit with only a glancing blow; again U-94 passed down the port side, this time about twenty feet off. Now we unleashed a weapon hitherto untried in modern warfare.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Imagine, if you can, six stokers pelting the enemy
with Coke bottles at twenty feet


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stationed on the fiddley abaft the funnel were six stokers not needed in the engine room during action. Their job was to reload the depth-charge throwers. But we weren't firing the throwers so these stokers had nothing to do. And yet here were German faces on the bridge of a U-boat just a few feet away. U-94 was so close our guns could not depress to fire. Also on the fiddley abaft the funnel, the canteen manager stowed his empty Coke bottles. To stokers, ignorant engineers uninstructed in the art of war, the connection was obvious.

Imagine, if you can, six stokers pelting the enemy with Coke bottles at twenty feet, crying, "Yah! Yah!" Ducking heads on U-94 testified to their accuracy. If Ites' courage ever forsook him, it must have been then.

Depth charges were fired again. One exploded directly under her. She bucked, spray obscured her, then she slowed. Oakville opened the range. If destroyers are 'greyhounds of the fleet', corvettes are the tenacious terriers. We opened range, swung round, and plunged in the third time. The two .5 inch sent a steady stream of fire at U-94. Bullets whinged off at wild angles, red tracer glowing hot. The captain was getting the hang of it - this time his aim was sure. At right angles we struck U-94, our bow reared up, and U-94 rolled under. Beneath our bottom we felt three distinct shocks and heard rending metal. U-94 wallowed astern, and stopped. But Father [nickname for the captain] was just warming up.

"Away boarding party," he cried. "Come on, Lawrence! Get cracking! Never mind lowering the boat; I'll put you alongside."

I thought sceptically of his two misses.

In the confusion of a misfire in the 4-inch gun, and then a blast from it as it fired again, the boarding party became disorganized. Lawrence, suffering a nose-bleed from the muzzle blast, jumped onto the deck of the submarine. Only Petty Officer Powell was able to follow as the gap between the vessels widened and they drifted apart. Lawrence and Powell were two men against thirty still able-bodied Germans.

Lawrence knocked one German from behind the wrecked 88mm gun into the water. As they rounded the connning tower, two more Germans jumped into the water and Powell knocked a third off the sub. Twenty-six to two, but more Germans were coming out of the conning tower.

Lawrence ordered the first two out to stop but they kept coming. At three feet, he fired his .45 pistol and the impact flipped the leading German backwards over the side. Powell shot the second; a third, half-out, ducked below again. Lawrence and Powell commanded the only useable exit. An open deck hatch led to only a flooded compartment. The submarine was dead in the water and effectively captured, the crew prisoners below.

However, the crew had opened the sea-***** to scuttle the submarine and they had to be let on deck to complete the surrender. Lawrence waved them out with his pistol. No more casualties occurred as the defeated submariners emerged and milled about on deck. Their number included Otto Ites who had a broken arm, and bullet wounds in the other.

Powell covered them with his pistol while Lawrence went below to try to shut off the flooding and prevent the sinking of the sub. He found the valves, but the control room was already awash in chest-deep seawater and bulkheads began to give way. Powell shouted a warning from above. Lawrence clambered out.

The two Canadian officers and their twenty-six German prisoners jumped off the sub into the dark water, and U-94 sank below the waves for the last time. In the distance, the crump of exploding torpedoes and pillars of flame showed other U-boats busy at their work.

The ramming had done considerable hull damage to the Oakville and the corvette was limping. For a while she was in danger of explosion from flooding in the boiler room.

The destroyer USS Lea picked up Lawrence and most of the prisoners. Oakville's skiff picked up Powell and a half-dozen Germans, including Ites, the U-boat commander. By 0100 hours that same night, Lawrence, who had been transferred back to the Oakville, was standing his regular watch.

Nineteen Germans on U-94 died. Oakville had not a single casualty. It did have one injury. When Lawrence slipped down U-94's conning tower hatch to try to stop the flooding, he cut his elbow on a shard from a Coke bottle.

The King has been graciously pleased to approve the following award:
Distinguished Service Cross
Lieutenant Harold Ernest Thomas Lawrence,
RCNVR, HMCS Oakville
For gallant and courageous action in close contact with the enemy.

"Lieutenant Lawrence was in charge of a boarding party of two which attempted to prevent the scuttling of a U-boat. With complete disregard for his own safety, this officer, accompanied by a Petty Officer, boarded the U-boat and, having subdued the enemy crew, he took action in an endeavour to prevent the scuttling of the U-boat, notwithstanding the fact that it was then sinking. His spirited and determined conduct was worthy of the highest traditions of the Royal Canadian Navy."
http://www.geocities.com/ikvwarlord/gimp_temp.2651181.gif

[This message was edited by Blackfleet on Mon September 13 2004 at 03:49 PM.]

hauitsme
09-12-2004, 11:35 PM
Coke bottles! Now that's funny! If there was a movie made of that encounter, everyone would say it was just more 'Hollywood' hype!

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