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View Full Version : Bizzaro:: Saw Contrails Crabbing Today (USA Florida).



LEXX_Luthor
01-29-2004, 11:26 PM
Wow! I used to watch clouds and planes and stuff, but never saw such ExTreme sky behavior before. I think we had some ~very~ high West-to-East winds at high altitude last night and this morning (USA Florida).

This morning after sunrise the mostly clear sky was populated with some sheets of cirrus sheared into fine filaments more than I ever seen before, all over the sky. And the cirrus clouds blew past faster than I ever seen before. Typical North~South jets were pulling contrails that pointed in one direction, but were moving in another direction, about 40 degrees difference. That is alot of wind to push a jet off course. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif Like, the jet and its contrail would move half sideways. You see this alot on low altitude prop planes, but high speed jets?

A ~3km mile long section of persistent contrail was sheared off at one end at a 90 degree angle, with the sheared section about ~1 km long. Never seen the remains of a contrail do that before. This morning the whole sky just looked freaky, like another planet's atmosphere. Cirrus clouds stretched out more and moving faster than I ever seen before. I figure the wind up there was a good 300km/hr. I dunno. Freaked me out. Maybe we had a piece of jet stream overhead.


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
---> http://www.sunrise-aviation.com/articles/PP/Crosswinds.html

Wind does, however, have a definite effect on the track of the plane across the ground: to the outside observer, a plane flying in a crosswind appears to be moving sideways--;which is why flight in crosswinds is called "crabbing." The sideways motion is, as stated, an aerodynamic illusion--;the plane is moving perfectly straight through the airmass--;but the drift across the surface of the planet is real enough. At the moment of touchdown, this sideways movement becomes a problem: failure to align the aircraft fuselage with your groundtrack results in sideways impact on the landing gear.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



__________________
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Stanly is a moron, kai is a walking dead beet, Xev just want sex.
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LEXX_Luthor
01-29-2004, 11:26 PM
Wow! I used to watch clouds and planes and stuff, but never saw such ExTreme sky behavior before. I think we had some ~very~ high West-to-East winds at high altitude last night and this morning (USA Florida).

This morning after sunrise the mostly clear sky was populated with some sheets of cirrus sheared into fine filaments more than I ever seen before, all over the sky. And the cirrus clouds blew past faster than I ever seen before. Typical North~South jets were pulling contrails that pointed in one direction, but were moving in another direction, about 40 degrees difference. That is alot of wind to push a jet off course. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif Like, the jet and its contrail would move half sideways. You see this alot on low altitude prop planes, but high speed jets?

A ~3km mile long section of persistent contrail was sheared off at one end at a 90 degree angle, with the sheared section about ~1 km long. Never seen the remains of a contrail do that before. This morning the whole sky just looked freaky, like another planet's atmosphere. Cirrus clouds stretched out more and moving faster than I ever seen before. I figure the wind up there was a good 300km/hr. I dunno. Freaked me out. Maybe we had a piece of jet stream overhead.


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
---&gt; http://www.sunrise-aviation.com/articles/PP/Crosswinds.html

Wind does, however, have a definite effect on the track of the plane across the ground: to the outside observer, a plane flying in a crosswind appears to be moving sideways--;which is why flight in crosswinds is called "crabbing." The sideways motion is, as stated, an aerodynamic illusion--;the plane is moving perfectly straight through the airmass--;but the drift across the surface of the planet is real enough. At the moment of touchdown, this sideways movement becomes a problem: failure to align the aircraft fuselage with your groundtrack results in sideways impact on the landing gear.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>



__________________
RUSSIAN lexx website http://www.lexx.ufo.ru/members.shtml
Stanly is a moron, kai is a walking dead beet, Xev just want sex.
:
you will still have FB , you will lose nothing ~WUAF_Badsight

owlwatcher
01-30-2004, 03:58 AM
The best crabs come from Maryland USA.
When I go crabing, I can watch A-10s, C-130, police Helos and medivac"s flying & taking off out of Martins. Note: At one time the largest private air port on east coast. Also built seaplanes and B-26s here.

Tully__
01-30-2004, 03:59 AM
I know a commercial pilot who tells me that 30 degree course offset due to jetstream crosswind is not that uncommon on trans-pacific flights.

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