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Pres_in_the_sky
05-24-2004, 03:56 AM
I'd like to know what conditions lead to a spin. Other threads here say that every spin is preceeded by a stall but I've often fallen into a spin at high speed, usually too fast, and the spin seems initiated by shaking.

I've just pumped the game up from easy to realistic - and the reality is I can't really control the planes well it seems. This is a tough jump !

Pres_in_the_sky
05-24-2004, 03:56 AM
I'd like to know what conditions lead to a spin. Other threads here say that every spin is preceeded by a stall but I've often fallen into a spin at high speed, usually too fast, and the spin seems initiated by shaking.

I've just pumped the game up from easy to realistic - and the reality is I can't really control the planes well it seems. This is a tough jump !

Friendly_flyer
05-24-2004, 04:16 AM
You could try realistic, but unselect "stall and spinns". The plane still stalls, but it won't start to spinn and fall out of the sky. When you have gotten the hang of it, you can try full real.

Fly friendly!

Petter Bøckman
Norway

ELEM
05-24-2004, 04:29 AM
Nothing strange about it. A stall and spin can happen at any speed. The shaking you can feel is the airframe buffet that precedes the stall. When you feel that, you should react to it by easing off the elevator to allow the airflow to re-attach to the wing. Ignore that buffet at your peril. This site explains it quite well:-

http://sky.prohosting.com/air2/index6.htm

I wouldn't join any club that would have ME as member!

http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/I-16_desktop.jpg

VF-19
05-24-2004, 04:29 AM
In addition, some planes will stall and spin much more easier than others. Right now I'm finding that the Yak-9B is very spin happy when there's a bomb load in it. Then again, it would be when there's a nice massive weight in the plane (and I don't mean my fat butt).

ELEM
05-24-2004, 04:32 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by VF-19:
In addition, some planes will stall and spin much more easier than others. Right now I'm finding that the Yak-9B is very spin happy when there's a bomb load in it. Then again, it would be when there's a nice massive weight in the plane (and I don't mean my fat butt).<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It's not the weight itself but where it's placed, behind the C of G, which makes it unstable.

I wouldn't join any club that would have ME as member!

http://img35.photobucket.com/albums/v107/Elem_Klimov/I-16_desktop.jpg

AirBot
05-24-2004, 08:56 AM
A spin is a stall where one wing stalls before the other - an asymmetric stall - causing the aircraft to spin. A spin is not preceeded by a stall, it IS a stall.
As with a stall, airframe buffeting will occur before the spin. This is your warning to ease off the stick.

ruekesj
05-24-2004, 09:30 AM
a stall is preceeded by a buffet (shake) of the air not flowing fast or smooth enough over the wing to generate lift. most high performance aircraft will spin instead of stall because they are inherently less stable than trainers (you have to try really hard to spin a cessna 152). the spin as a stall happens because one wing will stop to generate lift and the other will continue to generate lift.

Chuck_Older
05-24-2004, 11:02 AM
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

The often misunderstood high speed stall.

It is difficult to conceptualise, but speed alone doesn't gaurantee a stall free-flight.

*****************************
The hillsides ring with, "Free the People",
Or can I hear the echoes from the days of '39?
~ Clash

AirBot
05-24-2004, 11:33 AM
Ah yes... forgot to mention that.
Stalling your airplane is possible at any airspeed as long as you have enough control authority to sufficiently increase the angle of attack. Stall speed, if I'm not mistaken, is simply the speed at which flying straight and level will require critical AoA.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

The often misunderstood high speed stall.

It is difficult to conceptualise, but speed alone doesn't gaurantee a stall free-flight.

*****************************
The hillsides ring with, "Free the People",
Or can I hear the echoes from the days of '39?
~ Clash
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Taylortony
05-24-2004, 11:50 AM
Just to expand on it all...You are all right but a bit awry in the cause of the buffet in the text mentioned in the above link at the start, an interesting read BTW it mentions washout, this is where a wing is twisted to prevent stall at the ailerons to maintain control. now on the Cessna 152 mentioned above, this the twist is measured from the wing strut outwards to the tip and is set at 1 degree of twist, hence why the stall warning horn is inboard of the strut.

But I digress, the "Buffet" you are all talking about is not the product of buffet (shake) of the air not flowing fast or smooth enough over the wing to generate lift"

but is rather the result of the wing stalling inboard at the wing root section and the dirty air flow from that buffeting the Horizontal tailplane and elevator and acting upon that, hence the feel of it and the buffeting felt through the stick... Some Aircraft like Aerobatic ones have wash in as it is more desirable to have tip stall on them btw.