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chris455
05-04-2004, 01:24 AM
Had an opportunity to go to the wings over Gillespie Airshow last weekend. Met a couple of great guys, Hamilton McWhorter (Cdr, USN Ret.) and a man by the name of Julius "Jack" Jacobson.
Just a couple of average joes in their 80's, the kinda guys that remind you of your grandpa.
Except this McWhorter fellow, he was not only a double ace and then some, he was the first Hellcat ace in the US Navy.

And Jack? Oh, he knew a little about WWII and airplanes himself. Said one mission he flew with a bunch of other P-38 pilots was to get a Japanese admiral by the name of Yamamoto.
I think I'd heard about that somewhere. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Jack says they got him. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

So I'm standing there, listening to these gentlemen talk, and some guy walks up to the kiosk and says "So, was it hard dogfighting with a Zero?"

Dead silence from the aces.

Actually, kind of an embarassed silence. They all look at each other as if to say, "somebody want to explain to this guy about "dogfighting" Zeros?"

Then finally, Commander McWhorter says to the guy,

"You don't want to do that".

"Do what?"

"Dogfight with a Zero"

"Why?"

"Not a bright thing to do"

"Then how did you shoot them down?"

More pregnant silence. Then, one of these men-former WWII fighter aces- says to the guy,

"You watch that Baa Baa Black sheep show, doncha?" http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/88.gif

I got an autographed photo from Cdr. McWhorter.
I shook all their hands, thanked them for their sacrifices and gave them a sincere "well done, Sir."

I loved those guys. It was a strange feeling being in their presence. It's the same feeling I get when I'm with my dad, or when I was a kid and my uncles were still alive and I got to spend time with them.

You know they were there. They saw it.

It humbles you.

http://members.cox.net/miataman1/p47n2.jpg

chris455
05-04-2004, 01:24 AM
Had an opportunity to go to the wings over Gillespie Airshow last weekend. Met a couple of great guys, Hamilton McWhorter (Cdr, USN Ret.) and a man by the name of Julius "Jack" Jacobson.
Just a couple of average joes in their 80's, the kinda guys that remind you of your grandpa.
Except this McWhorter fellow, he was not only a double ace and then some, he was the first Hellcat ace in the US Navy.

And Jack? Oh, he knew a little about WWII and airplanes himself. Said one mission he flew with a bunch of other P-38 pilots was to get a Japanese admiral by the name of Yamamoto.
I think I'd heard about that somewhere. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Jack says they got him. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

So I'm standing there, listening to these gentlemen talk, and some guy walks up to the kiosk and says "So, was it hard dogfighting with a Zero?"

Dead silence from the aces.

Actually, kind of an embarassed silence. They all look at each other as if to say, "somebody want to explain to this guy about "dogfighting" Zeros?"

Then finally, Commander McWhorter says to the guy,

"You don't want to do that".

"Do what?"

"Dogfight with a Zero"

"Why?"

"Not a bright thing to do"

"Then how did you shoot them down?"

More pregnant silence. Then, one of these men-former WWII fighter aces- says to the guy,

"You watch that Baa Baa Black sheep show, doncha?" http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/88.gif

I got an autographed photo from Cdr. McWhorter.
I shook all their hands, thanked them for their sacrifices and gave them a sincere "well done, Sir."

I loved those guys. It was a strange feeling being in their presence. It's the same feeling I get when I'm with my dad, or when I was a kid and my uncles were still alive and I got to spend time with them.

You know they were there. They saw it.

It humbles you.

http://members.cox.net/miataman1/p47n2.jpg

Giganoni
05-04-2004, 02:01 AM
Chris..you didn't get to see the Mexican Jug fighter Pilot on Saturday!?! He was a Jug loving nut just like you! He went on and on about the Jug and how it always brought him home. Plus they had a German pilot which was really cool, but the lady that interviewed him was silly. He says he was in the Luff and she says "So, what was it like flying for Rumania?" "Oh, you flew for the luftwaffe, how did that come about?" Then he said "I was born in F***ING Germany! Why wouldn't I be IN"...okay he didn't say that, but it was an odd question.

stansdds
05-04-2004, 04:29 AM
Well, many reporters seem to know very little history and they are more entertainment for the men than anything else. Let's face it, would most of us watch the news if ugly people were the only ones on tv?

arcadeace
05-04-2004, 04:45 AM
I'm glad you shared it Chris. To me it almost seems unreal you can still get that close. It was very telling and speaks more than a thousand pics.

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/222_1082457373_222_1082441075_airaces.jpg

chris455
05-04-2004, 06:39 AM
Gig, I tried to meet the Mexican gentleman, but he was always surrounded by poeple, so I didn't get too. And yes, he WAS a "Jug loving nut" like me alright! I was fortunate enought o hear him speak though.
The Luftwaffe Pilot was Herr Rudat, head of the local German-American society. A fine man, I have known him for years.
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

http://members.cox.net/miataman1/p47n2.jpg

Latico
05-04-2004, 05:43 PM
It's funny how some veterans can talk about their expeeriences and others won't.

My Dad was a grunt in the US Army 80th Chem Morter Bat, 40 Inf Div. He was in New Guinea, Leyte, Negros and Penau. I can't remember him ever telling a combat story. At best he only says that he was a nineteen year old, whos' main priority was to "keep my butt as deep in a fox hole I could". He says he rarely knew where he was, he just went where he was told.

He told us that most of the Japanese that he saw were deathly sick or half starved. He was on an LSD headed for the Northern Island of Japan when the IJ surrendered. Said that he went to bed headed North from the Philipines and woke up the next morning and the ship was headed south. Finished out his hitch at Leyte on a QS boat.

I was really shocked when he told us of botching his chances at flight school after he returned home. He was expecting a train ride to the base, but they came by to get him in a bus. He pitched a fit and he was given a choice to either get on the bus or forget flight training with the UsAAF. Well.........so much for bull headedness. My Grandpa taught him to fly.