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Atomic_Marten
06-18-2004, 12:49 PM
I've got a question regarded to this matter simply because I've found myself numerous times in occasions where my engine starts to emmit smoke, and I wonder what to do to help it last longer before it cuts out. Some advice appreciated. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Atomic_Marten
06-18-2004, 12:49 PM
I've got a question regarded to this matter simply because I've found myself numerous times in occasions where my engine starts to emmit smoke, and I wonder what to do to help it last longer before it cuts out. Some advice appreciated. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

_VR_ScorpionWorm
06-18-2004, 01:03 PM
Hit ctrl-e http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/59.gif

Ive found that turn the mixture down on some aircraft helps a little, but if your smoking black its oil and its only a matter of time before it locks up. I dont know if prop-pitch helps any. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

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x6BL_Brando
06-18-2004, 01:03 PM
Are you talking about damage from AAA or nme aircraft? If not, you may be describing the smoking which occurs at higher altitudes if your engines fuel/air mixture is too rich. If you're using CEM (complex engine-management) then you will need to have Control keys mapped to this adjustment.
If you're desribing the effects of gunfire then the choices are numerous, and depend on the conditions you are in - how far from home, how many enemy a/c in the area and what alt they're at, whether there is a concentration of enemy AAA on your most direct escape route, and so on. It also depends on what aircraft you are flying. Some have less tolerance than others.

In some cases it may be worth using what life is left in the engine to climb, and then go for a long shallow glide across the front line. Other times you may just need to put the nose down and use the remaining engine life to get away as fast as possible! The most important factor is to get yourself over friendly territory, avoiding interception, and then bail out if necessary. Don't forget to unload your major ordnance before attempting a forced landing. or it'll play havoc with your hair-do ;-)

Hope that helps <S>

Atomic_Marten
06-18-2004, 01:42 PM
Sorry x6BL_Brando, my post is about engine hited by flak, or MG-cannon rounds, I did not make it clear though http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. Not about mixture on high alts (ussualy occurs like two black trails on each side of the fuselage).

But really what I was looking for is a way to get your engine last longer in attempt to manage to get it over friendly territory or even to home base. Currently flying P-40, 'realistic' sett. But no matter of A/C type, there have to be some common tips. I've tryed with getting alt then turn engine off, when I'm on lower alt I turn it on again, but this does not seem to help-engine is still deteriorating while in off state. Also I immediatelly fire all my ordnance to make A/C less heavy-that however must help a little http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif. I will try with mixture. In desperate cases lowering prop. pitch may be helpfull (at least this works on 0% power when engine is NOT hited, you will retain speed longer when on 0% prop. pitch than on 100%-- but does it works for hited engine though?..). Any other tips?

x6BL_Brando
06-18-2004, 03:37 PM
One small problem, for me anyway, is that "hited" is not actually a word in the English language - which is what confused me when I replied. FYI the word hit is all you need to use - it doubles as both a noun and a verb - as in "I scored a hit on his aeroplane" and "I saw my bullets hit his aeroplane". English is such a complicated language http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

If an engine has been hit and oil is leaking then turning off the engine, in order to save it for later use, may well not help. In real life a big hole in the sump or oiltank would allow the oil to drain away whether the engine is running or not. Once the oil is all gone then engine failure is imminent anyway, so you may as well use the short time you've got to put as much distance between you & immediate danger as you can. Alternatively, if oil pressure was only slightly affected then it might be possible to ease back and spare the engine somewhat, saving any full-power usage until it's really needed. It does depend on whether the damage model is that exacting, but I remember reading once that the DM was designed to be discerning about levels of damage. Don't forget that a damaged engine may just not restart at all, it's not totally dependant on oil supply.

The Polikarpov radials are a good example: quite often I've been in one that has taken one or more hits to the engine, though with no visible smoke, and lost a fair amount of power. It feels as though one or more cylinders have been perforated, or maybe the valve gear is damaged, but the plane will still manage to fly a long distance at a lower speed. In this case it's important to keep the engine revving to stay in the air. The opposite is true when a hit causes the engine to race - a rapid drop in revs is needed to prevent the engine from quitting, and feathering the prop is of the utmost importance. It all just depends on the circumstances.

Another possibility is that a fuel leak arises, followed by an engine fire. Your best bet may then be to keep the engine running, at least until you bail out - finely explained by a quote from a vintage motorcycle manual.

"In the event of a carburettor fire DO NOT PANIC! Do not attempt to beat at the flames or run away from the vehicle. Calmly reach under the tank with your gloved hands and switch off the fuel taps, then rev the engine firmly. The result will be to safely draw the flames into the engine along with any unburnt vapours, thereby rendering the fire harmless."
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif I can tell you from experience that it's hard advice to put into play, but it works!