PDA

View Full Version : Captured Corsair By LW.



WereSnowleopard
06-14-2004, 05:54 PM
I am not joke! It caught my eye when surf. I am not sure if it is true but it is up to you to decide if it is true. http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/Aircraft/FAACapturedAircraftHomepage.html

"Corsair JT404 of 1841 squadron. Involved in anti-submarine patrol from HMS Formidable enroute to Scapa after Operation Mascot against the German Battleship Tirpitz, in company with Barracuda of Wing Leader Lt Cdr RS Baker-Falkner. Emergency landing in a field at Sorvag, Hameroy, near Bodo, Norway on 18 July 1944. The pilot Lt Mattholie taken POW and the aircraft captured intact with no damage. The german authorities made attempts to get the pilot to explain how to fold the wings so as to transport the aircraft to Narvik. Aircraft was ferried by boat for further investigation. It is not known if the Corsair was taken to Germany. This was probably the first Corsair captured by the Germans. Aircraft is listed at Rechlin for 1944 under repair.

http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/Aircraft/CapturedCorsairartistsimpression-profile.jpg

Regards
Snowleopard

WereSnowleopard
06-14-2004, 05:54 PM
I am not joke! It caught my eye when surf. I am not sure if it is true but it is up to you to decide if it is true. http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/Aircraft/FAACapturedAircraftHomepage.html

"Corsair JT404 of 1841 squadron. Involved in anti-submarine patrol from HMS Formidable enroute to Scapa after Operation Mascot against the German Battleship Tirpitz, in company with Barracuda of Wing Leader Lt Cdr RS Baker-Falkner. Emergency landing in a field at Sorvag, Hameroy, near Bodo, Norway on 18 July 1944. The pilot Lt Mattholie taken POW and the aircraft captured intact with no damage. The german authorities made attempts to get the pilot to explain how to fold the wings so as to transport the aircraft to Narvik. Aircraft was ferried by boat for further investigation. It is not known if the Corsair was taken to Germany. This was probably the first Corsair captured by the Germans. Aircraft is listed at Rechlin for 1944 under repair.

http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/Aircraft/CapturedCorsairartistsimpression-profile.jpg

Regards
Snowleopard

ASM 1
06-14-2004, 06:04 PM
nice! very interesting.... http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Horrid cammo job on the captured spit though
http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/Aircraft/Spitfire_MkIX_nazicaptured_wartimecolour.jpg

and its a mark IX as well http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

S!

Andrew

http://img78.photobucket.com/albums/v299/asm016/WW2%20Stuff/Sig_Pic.jpg

LubricatedGoat
06-14-2004, 07:16 PM
Nice pics.

Not unusual, though. If you manage to over-run an airfield and the enemy has the misfortune of being caught by surprise or make the tactical error of not getting their planes up, you get to keep em. (I think it's in the contract. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif) And, as seems to have happened with many of these planes, if you make an emergency landing in enemy territory, same deal.

The only good thing is that they can't exactly special order any parts from the factory:

Heinz (In thick German accent): Hey, sorry to bother you, but ve happened to capture several Corsairs and, vell, vee ver vundering if you could send us a Vought catalog?

Eisenhower: Hey, Heinz...?

Heinz: Yes?

Eisenhower: **** off!

Click, line goes dead. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/88.gif

http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/59.gif

The Goat

Red_Storm
06-14-2004, 07:18 PM
Why would they want to fly Corsairs with this .50 dispersion? http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

---
http://www.albumsnaps.com/viewPhoto.php?id=42993

HuninMunin
06-14-2004, 07:22 PM
No one would want to fly a corsair if avoidable.
They look, um...clumsy. (trys to be polite)

"Ruhe im Puff!" - Thomsen

jttthomas
06-14-2004, 07:54 PM
lol..they weren't called the Ensign Eliminator for nothing!! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

darkhorizon11
06-14-2004, 08:53 PM
Nice thats amazing. Gives me more ammo to lobby for a Corsair in FB! I had no idea they saw any service in Europe during the war.

Say what you want but it could grab the Zero by its ballz. I wonder how a spits, 109s, FWs, and Lavochins stack up against that beast.

Obi_Kwiet
06-14-2004, 09:19 PM
It had a nice 20/1 kill death ratio! It can't be all that bad.

k5054
06-15-2004, 12:37 AM
The Spit is a Mk XI and the RAF painted it in that blue high-alt scheme, not the LW.

Ki_Rin
06-15-2004, 01:02 AM
I think it was the Fleet Air Arm that used wildcats in ETO, they called them Martlets, I think...and I believe a Martlet was actually responsible for the very first British, or possibly whole Allied (or maybe just FAA) air to air victory over an axis ac...but fo r the life of me, I cannot remember the victim's type, but I think it was a seaplane...

The FAA also used corsairs, and at least in PTO, used them from smaller ac carriers than the usa counterparts, and a great deal sooner than the us navy dared to...

I know the corsair was evaluated in england in 1943, but even if there was a single squadron in a service test mode, or an OTU is beyond me...

Wonder if we'll ever see a Vultee P-66 in the game? hhhhmmmmmmmmmmmmm

"Consequences are for lesser beings; I am Ki-Rin...that is sanction enough"

reisen52
06-15-2004, 02:15 AM
The aircraft was distinguished from its USN counter part by the clipped wingtips. The British removed eight inches from each wingtip to allow the aircraft to be stowed in the hangar deck of British carriers. This also gave the Corsair a more 'sporty' performance when it came to wing rolling, along with preventing the 'float' which had given US fliers trouble in deck operations.

http://www.avhistory.org/bear257Images/ffaf4.jpg

FAA F4U's participated in Operation Tungsten with 1834 Squadron and 1836 Squadron flying from Victorious. This was a role the FAA Corsairs of 1841 Squadron would repeat, flying off Formidable in Operation Mascot on 17 July and with 1841 joined by 1842 Squadron in Operation Goodwood in late August.

No contact was made with any German aircraft. The FAA F4U's never did meet up with any German aircraft. In the fall of 1944 the F4U's were operating in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

Reisen

Franzen
06-15-2004, 04:03 AM
Actually, I never knew they were in Europe. Interesting.

BTW, I was looking at some pics of captured Migs the other day. They were green with and extremely bright yellow tail and rear fuselage.

I always thought captured aircraft were interesting to look at.

Fritz franzen

Philipscdrw
06-15-2004, 04:33 AM
Yup, the Fleet Air Arm (that's like the USN air squadrons but for Great Britainland) were flying them around, y'all.

PhilipsCDRw

"Nietzsche is dead." - God.

View Cpt. Eric Brown's review of FB here. (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?a=tpc&s=400102&f=63110913&m=309109534&r=875101634#875101634)

Franzen
06-15-2004, 04:44 AM
Ok, how long before someone starts bugging Oleg for a corsair in for the AEP?

Fritz Franzen

ASM 1
06-15-2004, 05:16 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by k5054:
The Spit is a Mk XI and the RAF painted it in that blue high-alt scheme, not the LW.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

ok fair doos - made my judgement from looking at the properties for its link:
http://www.fleetairarmarchive.net/Aircraft/Spitfire_MkIX_nazicaptured_wartimecolour.jpg

the "Gold" tail does look awful thoughhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

S!

Andrew

http://img78.photobucket.com/albums/v299/asm016/WW2%20Stuff/Sig_Pic.jpg

Franzen
06-15-2004, 05:25 AM
The picture quality is bad. I think the tail was actually yellow, not gold. Maybe they used the same paint as what they used to paint under the engine on the 109's. Just a guess though.

Fritz franzen

k5054
06-15-2004, 09:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> posted 15-06-04 00:02 Tue June 15 2004 12:02 AM
I think it was the Fleet Air Arm that used wildcats in ETO, they called them Martlets, I think...and I believe a Martlet was actually responsible for the very first British, or possibly whole Allied (or maybe just FAA) air to air victory over an axis ac...but fo r the life of me, I cannot remember the victim's type, but I think it was a seaplane...
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

From my copious and occasionally accurate memory, the first British kill of WW2 was scored by the FAA, a Skua (will we ever get that in FB?) forced down a Do-18 3 or 4 Sept 1939. The Martlet is sometimes given the credit of first kill for a US a/c in British service, a Ju-88 over Scapa Flow on 25 Dec 1940, but this is really only true for a US fighter, Hudsons had victories (front guns too) before that, at Dunkirk. RN Martlets also served in the Desert, as did USN F4Fs over the Torch landings, it would surely qualify for AEP, and as there is a PF model.....

CRSutton
06-15-2004, 10:44 AM
IIRC it was the Brits who took the plunge and began operating the corsair from carriers before the Americans. The Americans thought the aircraft was just too difficult to land on carriers and opeted instead to kept the wildcat until the hellcat came along. American corsairs were given over to land based marine squadrons. Once the Brits proved that the plane could sucessfully operate from carriers, the Americans began to base them on carriers as well. Excellent plane.

ASM 1
06-15-2004, 10:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Franzen:
The picture quality is bad. I think the tail was actually yellow, not gold. Maybe they used the same paint as what they used to paint under the engine on the 109's. Just a guess though.

Fritz franzen<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah its a poor pic, but the 'slapped on' look, particularly the swastika doesn't do it any favours.....

S!

Andrew

http://img78.photobucket.com/albums/v299/asm016/WW2%20Stuff/Sig_Pic.jpg

p1ngu666
06-15-2004, 11:04 AM
brits fixed the corsair so it wouldnt bounce horribly on landing, a few other things like curve aproach too http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

http://www.pingu666.modded.me.uk/mysig3.jpg
&lt;123_GWood_JG123&gt; NO SPAM!

Ki_Rin
06-15-2004, 10:52 PM
ty, K5054....my memory is obviously shot, and sadly, all my reference material is in storage, for the time being, so I cant check anything out, even if I wasn't too lazty too http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by k5054:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> posted 15-06-04 00:02 Tue June 15 2004 12:02 AM
I think it was the Fleet Air Arm that used wildcats in ETO, they called them Martlets, I think...and I believe a Martlet was actually responsible for the very first British, or possibly whole Allied (or maybe just FAA) air to air victory over an axis ac...but fo r the life of me, I cannot remember the victim's type, but I think it was a seaplane...
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

From my copious and occasionally accurate memory, the first British kill of WW2 was scored by the FAA, a Skua (will we ever get that in FB?) forced down a Do-18 3 or 4 Sept 1939. The Martlet is sometimes given the credit of first kill for a US a/c in British service, a Ju-88 over Scapa Flow on 25 Dec 1940, but this is really only true for a US fighter, Hudsons had victories (front guns too) before that, at Dunkirk. RN Martlets also served in the Desert, as did USN F4Fs over the Torch landings, it would surely qualify for AEP, and as there is a PF model.....<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

"Consequences are for lesser beings; I am Ki-Rin...that is sanction enough"