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Tdavart
09-13-2004, 01:16 PM
Just thinking about some of the campaigns that could be created. This one could be a lot of fun. The CFS2 version sure was. But it would be even better in PF, with the great models and effects. Quite a few of the aircraft will be available: Beaufighter, A-20, P-38, P-40. Just won't be able to bomb with the B-17 or Lib.

Tdavart
09-13-2004, 01:16 PM
Just thinking about some of the campaigns that could be created. This one could be a lot of fun. The CFS2 version sure was. But it would be even better in PF, with the great models and effects. Quite a few of the aircraft will be available: Beaufighter, A-20, P-38, P-40. Just won't be able to bomb with the B-17 or Lib.

Retro.LNK.-
09-13-2004, 01:33 PM
Initially, when the Japanese task force left Rabaul on February 28, 1943, it had been spotted within 24 hours. However, in the days following, numerous B-24 and B-17 scouting flights could not relocate the task force. Finally, on March 2nd, a lone B-24 was able to pick up the task force by flying underneath the cloud cover. Their position was ominous -- right at the entrance to the Vitiaz Strait that runs between New Guinea and New Britain. Within the next day, the ships would likely reach Lae and offload over 7,000 fresh combat troops.

If they succeeded, there would be little that could save the island of New Guinea.

As the ships came east through the straits, however, the weather was clearing. Without the cover of the storm or of the night, Allied air power could be brought to bear. The fate of New Guinea would come down to "Kenney's Kids", the pilots and crews of the 5th Air Force. The battle on March 2nd would prove decisive.

The first move of the day's conflict, however, would not involve attacks on shipping at all -- it was about gaining the upper hand in the air and simply locating the Japanese ships once again so they could be attacked. At 6:30 am, a flight of six A-20 Boston IIIs of the 22nd RAAF Squadron set out to bomb Lae Airfield. The full length of the airstrip was covered by over a dozen bombs as the bombers blazed through, down low over the field.

Then, the 39th Fighter Squadron launched sixteen of their P-38s in a fighter sweep at 9:30 am. Their other mission was to attempt to relocate the Japanese task force. While they didn't sight the ships, they did encounter three Ki-43 Oscars NNW of Arawe. Two were shot down in rapid order.

With the morning wearing on and no Japanese ships yet sighted, General Kenney took a gamble. He ordered the launch of a flight of eight B-17s out of Port Morseby, loaded with 1,000 pound bombs. Their destination: the reported point where the Japanese had been the night before. If luck held, perhaps they would see the ships while enroute.

Flying low, between 5,000 and 7,500 feet, the eight B-17s found the Japanese ships inside the edges of the weather. Dodging through the clouds, they bombed them, but had great difficulty assessing damage due to the cloud cover and a dozen Japanese Oscars and Haps that were orbiting low overhead as air cover to protect the ships. One cargo ship could be seen burning with several Japanese destroyers attempting to assist, but the B-17s were forced to make a fast retreat in the clouds.

With the Japanese task force sighted again, the air assault began in earnest. Three more B-17s attacked within the next half hour, pummeling the ships and scoring a hit on another Japanese cargo ship. Then 11 more B-17s attacked just a few minutes later, scoring more hits with their bombs. By now, the Japanese air force had arrived and almost two dozen A6M Zeros and a half dozen Oscars were encountered.

On the water, the Japanese task force was a mess. Three destroyers, a gunboat, and five troop and cargo ships were hit by bombs. One of the ships had exploded in the water, another was sinking, and yet another was on fire. One of the destroyers was also afire and smoking heavily. And the attack had just begun.

The 321st Bomb Squadron arrived next with two B-24s, though all of their bombs were seen to miss. A B-24 with the 320th Bomb Squadron that was on armed reconnaissance also came upon the ships at 10:42 am, and tracked the convoy for a time, reporting back its exact position. Fifteen minutes later, another armed reconnaissance B-24 of the same squadron came on the scene and dropped its load, hitting one of the ships with a bomb.

That afternoon, the tempo of the assault decreased.

Retro.LNK.-
09-13-2004, 01:34 PM
I've put this on my list of engagements to re-create with Pacific Fighters.

I will be exploring the Coral Sea online campaign for a while at first though.

LW_Black4

XyZspineZyX
09-13-2004, 03:03 PM
Coral Sea...online?

Where? Who? Links, please! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

VW-IceFire
09-13-2004, 03:16 PM
I think he's talking about the new dynamic campaign generator for online play with more complex options and abilities.

I'm excited too http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

http://home.cogeco.ca/~cczerneda/sigs/tmv-sig1.jpg
RAF No 92 Squadron
"Either fight or die"

Tdavart
09-13-2004, 05:24 PM
That's a good description LW, but what I found so appealing were the low level strikes against the convoy by the Beau's and A-20s. That could be fun.

Doug_Thompson
09-13-2004, 05:49 PM
It would be a massacre.

http://www.model-news.com/projekt/335col/baerlog.jpg
Proud Charter Member of the Do-Do Birds Luftwhiners Chorus

XyZspineZyX
09-13-2004, 06:03 PM
Yeah, really it is. Oscars and Zekes have a hard time keeping up with those Beaus, A-20 and B-25 speedballs. and even if you do get a good pass at one in a Japanese fighter, it usually involves an (over)long approach right into the jaws of the flexgunners.