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Gato_M5
01-09-2004, 04:41 PM
I finished reading a book named "The Sixth Battle" (by Barrett Tillman). I wouldnâ´t ussually do any suggestion about this kind of things in this forum, but considering this case I really must do it. The best one I ever read. Here a couple of texts...

"As the three surviving A-6s climbed, the Russian 30mm gatlings opened up. Though US antiradar missiles and Prowler jamming denied the Eurasian carrier its full defenses, old fashioned barrage fire could score a lucky hit. Seemingly oblivious to the flak, Talent 510 managed to release four half-ton Mark 83s while 502 lased the target. The bombs entered the "capture basket" of 502's laser beam; their gimballed seeker heads centered the bombs in the beam, controlling fins to adjust the LGBs' glide path. Two fell short but two more bombs punctured the flight deck. Smoke and flame shot from holes like Roman candles on a lawn. The flattop was wounded. Feeling like a hunter closing on a
maddened lioness, Slats Flight pressed in..."

and another one...

"With the big ship locked up on radar and FLIR, Crunch followed the steering commands in his sight until the yellow "in range" lights began flashing. The pilot then pressed his "commit" trigger, and two seconds later the sight told him to pull up. At 30 degrees nose high, the attack computer released
the LGBs, which thumped off their racks microseconds apart. From two miles away at 2,800 feet, Varyag looked ominous. Slats and Crunch knew that she was not as large as a Forrestal class ship, but here was an enemy carrier, open to attack. The price of admission had been paid--three Intruders shot down. But now, bombs gone, USS Langley's CAG anticipated the payback. Crunch never hesitated when the red breakaway lights began flashing in his sight. Smoothly coordinating the controls, he rolled into a 120-degree banked turn, dropping for the deck. For a moment the crew had an eerie, vulnerable feeling as their belly was turned toward Varyag's guns."

Give it a try, you will not regreat.
Gato.

Gato_M5
01-09-2004, 04:41 PM
I finished reading a book named "The Sixth Battle" (by Barrett Tillman). I wouldnâ´t ussually do any suggestion about this kind of things in this forum, but considering this case I really must do it. The best one I ever read. Here a couple of texts...

"As the three surviving A-6s climbed, the Russian 30mm gatlings opened up. Though US antiradar missiles and Prowler jamming denied the Eurasian carrier its full defenses, old fashioned barrage fire could score a lucky hit. Seemingly oblivious to the flak, Talent 510 managed to release four half-ton Mark 83s while 502 lased the target. The bombs entered the "capture basket" of 502's laser beam; their gimballed seeker heads centered the bombs in the beam, controlling fins to adjust the LGBs' glide path. Two fell short but two more bombs punctured the flight deck. Smoke and flame shot from holes like Roman candles on a lawn. The flattop was wounded. Feeling like a hunter closing on a
maddened lioness, Slats Flight pressed in..."

and another one...

"With the big ship locked up on radar and FLIR, Crunch followed the steering commands in his sight until the yellow "in range" lights began flashing. The pilot then pressed his "commit" trigger, and two seconds later the sight told him to pull up. At 30 degrees nose high, the attack computer released
the LGBs, which thumped off their racks microseconds apart. From two miles away at 2,800 feet, Varyag looked ominous. Slats and Crunch knew that she was not as large as a Forrestal class ship, but here was an enemy carrier, open to attack. The price of admission had been paid--three Intruders shot down. But now, bombs gone, USS Langley's CAG anticipated the payback. Crunch never hesitated when the red breakaway lights began flashing in his sight. Smoothly coordinating the controls, he rolled into a 120-degree banked turn, dropping for the deck. For a moment the crew had an eerie, vulnerable feeling as their belly was turned toward Varyag's guns."

Give it a try, you will not regreat.
Gato.

p1ngu666
01-10-2004, 10:51 AM
what battle they talking about?

Chuck_Older
01-10-2004, 10:55 AM
Could be historical fiction. I think that the "Eurasian carriers" would tend to indicate it's not quite a true account since I can't think of a situation where A-6s would be or have been up against a presumably Soviet carrier group.

I could have misunderstood though

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S 8
01-10-2004, 10:59 AM
...or Flight Of Intruder.....A6 too.

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/ah_113_1073048715.jpg

Agamemnon22
01-10-2004, 11:03 AM
Since when are Mark 83's laser guided? http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/dumb/mk83.htm

horseback
01-10-2004, 04:45 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Agamemnon22:
Since when are Mark 83's laser guided? http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/dumb/mk83.htm<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Lasar guideance kits can be mounted on any US standard bomb. Putting a guidance package on a bomb doesn't change the bomb's designation. Tillman knows his stuff, Naval aviation-wise.

The book is one of those speculative "near future" fictions, a style popularized by Tom Clancy's stuff, as in "Red Storm Rising."

Cheers

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944